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Disassembled my bolt carrier for the first time..

Discussion in 'Black Rifle Forum' started by Soviet937, Feb 9, 2010.

  1. wasnt that bad i guess. eventually figured it out. rifle is a bushmaster xm15 e2s if it matters. i noticed when i took the actual bolt out that there was a bunch of carbon on the tail of it. i cleaned that off the best i could, and looking inside the carrier i noticed some carbon build up, doesnt look easy to get to though. i have a basic cleaning kit. my uncle told me though that the carbon inside the carrier can be cleaned if i really want to but its mainly cosmetic, can someone give me a second opinion please? and thank,

    and also, what kind of lubrication would be best and where to put it on the inside of the bolt carrier setup would be best?

    thanks for your time gentlemen.
     
  2. Onmilo

    Onmilo

    1,694
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    Jul 10, 2005
    Illinois
    There are carbon scrapers made specifically for cleaning the interior of the bolt carrier.
    http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=19646/Product/AR_15_M16_BOLT_CARRIER_CARBON_SCRAPER
    Lubricate the bolt well and install it in the carrier and lubricate the outside surfaces of the bolt carrier.

    Some like to run their weapon "wet" meaning literally dripping with oil, I like to use a good teflon based oil and run the bolt and carrier "damp" meaning the oil is visible on the surfaces but not oozing or dripping.
     


  3. Hedo1

    Hedo1

    1,101
    13
    Oct 1, 2007
    SE Pennsylvania
    I soak mine in a metal pan of brake cleaner every now and then. Take it out and give it a good scrub or scrape and it's usually clean and good to go.
     
  4. cool, thanks alot fellas, im was more of an AK kinda of guy but im learning more more about these things. sure do love them though :supergrin:
     
  5. I use brake cleaner too. Thing is I was specifically warned to take out the extractor and clean it separately without brake cleaner as the latter would allegedly break down the extractor insert.

    I'm a bit OC when it comes to cleaning...
     
  6. Reb 56

    Reb 56

    1,774
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    Mar 12, 2007
    South Texas
    Being new to AR's myself wonder how the GI's manage to clean their M4,s in the field after fighting all day then spending the night in a slit trench ? Seems like a complex job on my cleaning bench.
     
  7. just did mine too for the first time. wasnt bad at all. kinda satisfying actually.
     
  8. G32sapper

    G32sapper

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    Aug 31, 2009
    FT Hood, TX
    Cleaning in the field is a 5 min job if you run your AR wet. The carbon will just wipe right off.
     
  9. Reb 56

    Reb 56

    1,774
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    Mar 12, 2007
    South Texas
    Sure but do they take the bolt out of the carrier or just lube throug the ejection port? I'm talking at night in the dirt.
     
  10. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

    5,165
    0
    Jul 10, 2000
    I run my AR15's soaked with lube, and I am meticulous about cleaning them after shooting sessions. I'm an AK fan also, so I'm used to "hose it down with CLP, wipe off excess, couple passes with a bore snake, done". The AR15 is different. The fastest way to cause problems with an AR15 is to get it hot, dry, and full of carbon. Keeping it clean and soaked with lube is the best way to avoid problems. Any carbon on the bolt or carrier is bad, and any hardened carbon means it didn't have enough lube.
     
  11. Constructor

    Constructor Moderator

    552
    5
    Dec 10, 2009
    Roaming
    After cleaning coat the tail of the bolt close to the rings with white lithium grease or another high temp grease, Tetra, mobil 1 etc. it will help delay the carbon build up. The carrier key gas port directs the spent gases on to the slope just behind the gas rings.
    Break cleaner will remove the carbon but unless oiled after makes the surface very clean and carbon will stick to the bolt tail and build up faster.
     
  12. Hedo1

    Hedo1

    1,101
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    Oct 1, 2007
    SE Pennsylvania
    With that many tours under you belt...that's sage advice imo!
     
  13. Hedo1

    Hedo1

    1,101
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    Oct 1, 2007
    SE Pennsylvania
    I haven't heard that. Can't imagine that it would however. Interesting.
     
  14. Mayhem like Me

    Mayhem like Me Semper Paratus

    18,247
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    Mar 13, 2001
    Not a chance
    It's rubber or polymer brake cleaner can probably add to it's speed of degradation.
     
  15. Wade-0

    Wade-0

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    Apr 24, 2003
    Oregon
    .45cal bore brush also works pretty well for cleaning the inside of the carrier, and you can use a penny to safely scrape the carbon off the tail of the bolt. Keep it well lubed and the next cleaning will be a cinch.
     
  16. Flinter

    Flinter Hornady Fan

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    Oct 31, 2006
    Home, Sweet Home
    We don't clean them at night. We are usually busy moving/operating at night. If we need to clean them during the day and we are tactical one man watches the other wipes his bolt down and re-oils. Then they switch. Any grunt worth his salt knows there is no need to keep the thing inspection ready clean in order for it to function reliably.
     
  17. RMTactical

    RMTactical www.AR15pro.net CLM

    12,603
    16
    Oct 7, 2000
    Behind an AR-15
    I don't have a problem with carbon build up because I lube my rifles well at all times. This really cuts down on not just the carbon build up itself but makes what is there much easier to clean.

    That said, a little bit of carbon won't hurt anything.

    An AR15 is going to run well as long as it is properly lubed. Cleaning it is not nearly as important or vital as lube. Remember that. I prefer CLP because it works for me. Any lube is better than nothing though.
     
  18. Kentak

    Kentak

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    Central Ohio
    The best way I've found to remove the hard carbon on the tail of the bolt is to just scrape it off with one of those narrow blade utility knives--you know, the kind with the retracting blades with the snap-off points. Again, I'm talking about the part of the bolt that curves away from the rings towards the "tail" of the bolt. The other parts can be cleaned with a little solvent and a toothbrush.
     
  19. Kentak

    Kentak

    3,749
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    Jan 8, 2006
    Central Ohio
    Yes, I've come to believe the same thing. All that blackish lube may look messy, but it's not going to hurt anything. Cleaning an AR need not be a huge deal. Spray CLP or other proven solvent/lube of your choice and wipe off. I've modified a toothbrush to easily reach the nooks and crannies in the barrel extension to clean the lugs. I make sure there's no build up under the extractor claw or on the boltface, and that's about it.
     
  20. Whiskey Six

    Whiskey Six Marine 0369 Platinum Member

    1,798
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    Jul 25, 2007
    Kansas
    If you are sitting in a slit trench all night you have bigger problems than a dirty rifle. Slit trenches are for pooping.:rofl:
    This. Plus you don't lay your parts in the dirt. Pull the BCG out and lay in on your pack or whatever. Grab the cleaning brush and CLP and scrub it wet then wipe it off. Wet it down and reassemble. A stripper clip works well for scraping carbon.