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Digit camera depth of view

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by smile_at_u90012, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. Hi, been a long time since i visit,hope everyone is fine.On a 35 mm SLR ,the depth of view is determind by the apertures setting such as between f1.8 to f22, but on a digit camera, the aperture setting is so limited,for example,this is what the spec reads on my new cam: (f/2.7 – f/3.5, 36-432mm), so am i missing something or i wont have no depth of view to play with? BTW, the camera is canon 5S IS and here is a link http://www.dpreview.com/news/0705/07050703canons5is.asp
     
  2. Hokie

    Hokie NRA Member

    515
    0
    May 16, 2006
    VA
    It is because of the camera you have. If you buy a DSLR you would have the same aperture range as your fill SLR (as you are using the same lenses).

    I would suspect that the small sensor in the camera is why the limited the aperture so much. Small sensor with high megapixels have bad low light performance (lots of noise). So they counter act by not letting it stop down a lot so that it is alway getting as much light as it can.
     


  3. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
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    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    Yes. This is a variable aperture zoom lens. f/2.7-3.5 is the maximum aperture, but it is different at different zoom lengths. So, most likely at the short end it is f/2.7, at the long end it is f/3.5. Your minimum aperture in both cases is f/8.0.
     
  4. Oh well, i have also noticed there arent much different between a point and shoot digit cam and a bigger SLR look alike type of cam,so why they even bother to buy/make them?is it because they want the feel and look of a real slr? as for the depth of view issue, i will not have any luck with the canon? the price for a digit slr is not cheap these days.well, have to pay to play i guess.
     
  5. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
    0
    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    Actually, the prices of SLRs have come down dramatically. There are good reasons to buy non-SLR, of course, for some it could be form factor, for some it could be lack of noise. But if neither of those are of concern to you, and you don't need gadzillion megapixels, then look at the price of this camera (with lens):

    Nikon D40
     
  6. Hwyhobo..that Nikon D40 only have ISO from 200 thats not enough for fine photographs.may be i am wrong again..
     
  7. ToddHibbs

    ToddHibbs

    31
    0
    Mar 27, 2008
    The D40 was never intended for "fine photographs." It is an entry-level DSLR.

    The S5 IS is also a consumer level model. If your goal is shooting "fine photographs," you are probably not on the right track.

    A very good feature of the S5 is the ability to use off camera flash via a radio trigger such as Pocket Wizards. Getting off axis lighting will do a lot to maximize the quality of image you obtain from your S5.
     
  8. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
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    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    Well, so does Nikon D300 and Nikon D3 (both have base ISO of 200). There are ways around it if you must not have it. What applications do you see as critical that ISO 200 would break? I mean, in the worst case, you can use a neutral density filter, although it does sabotage the ultra low price of D40 somewhat.
     
  9. Let me clear myself a bit first,in a 35 mm film ISO can drop to 25,which gives a fine grain picture in close up and such,,but in digital term, isn't ISO 200 be in the same term as in 35 mm? if so, thats not nearly enough for micro or close ups.BTW, i have been lookin at the D40x from this canadian wholesales website, which charges lot less than anywhere i have seen in USA,even on Ebay, this model is running from $375 to 500 in USD, is the canadian site pulling legs?
     
  10. This is a Canadian wholesales website selling items in low cost, anyone had experience with it? I am looking to buy a Nikon 40Dx.Thanks in advance.
     
  11. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
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    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    It has nothing to do macro. 200 is just the base sensitivity of the sensor.

    Most likely. Do you have a URL? Kinda hard to guess what Canadian site you are talking about.
     
  12. I have just one thing to say, thanks a lot to u hwyhobo ,again,thanks.
     
  13. djf

    djf

    134
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    Jan 20, 2003
    Idaho
    So what? Going less than 200 on a DSLR does not buy you anything.
     
  14. Okay, i think i can understand about the ISO between film and digicam now, in digicam with an iso 200 iso sensor is about the same as a film camera with an iso of 25,BTW, I have won a bid on Ebay for a brand new Nikon D40 with lens for $382 plus $24 shipping,most of the other buyer in othe auctions paid up to $401 for the same camera.i think i had made a right choice, thanks everyone.
     
  15. djf

    djf

    134
    0
    Jan 20, 2003
    Idaho
    That isn't true. ISO relates directly to ASA. If you were talking about the DIN scale then you would be right.
     
  16. HI, and yes i realized that as well,so an ISO/ASA of 25 from a film camera more and less translates to ISO/ASA 200 of a digicam?
     
  17. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
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    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    No, 25 is still 25. I miss, however, why this relationship between film and digital is important to you? Perhaps you can give examples of situations where this would be critical to you?
     
  18. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
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    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    Actually, 200 ASA would translate to 24 DIN. ;)

    Just for the history buffs: DIN (Deutsches Institut für Normung) was a German organization for standardization, just like ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) is an international standards organization. For light sensitivity measurements DIN used logarithmic scale and expressed sensitivity in degrees marked as "DIN", ISO used arithmetic scale. To confuse the matters somewhat, ISO corresponded exactly to the older ASA (American Standards Association) norm. Through mergers and organizational changes ASA became what is known today as ANSI (American National Standards Institute).

    DIN and ISO correlate as follows:

    DIN - ISO
    15 - 25
    18 - 50
    21 - 100
    24 - 200
    27 - 400
    30 - 800
    33 - 1600
    36 - 3200

    Note that in the old days of film, speeds over 400 ASA/ISO in everyday applications were rarely used, and were mostly accomplished by "pushing" in the development process.

    I doubt this helps the OP, but what's a thread without a bit of trivia. ;)