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Chicken/Smart

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by okie, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. okie

    okie GT Mayor

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    Well I guess I am kinda chicken kinda smart. I am receiving an inheritance and I had planned on buying a bike. I had talked to a bunch of local riders and was deciding what bike I should get. I mentioned to a couple of people that I had slow reflexes and reaction times. Several people told me that would put me at a high risk for
    an accident. So I have decided not to get a bike. Sure would be fun though;1 ;1 ;1 ;Z
     
  2. RMTactical

    RMTactical www.AR15pro.net CLM

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    Behind an AR-15

  3. 2cats

    2cats Millennium Member

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    What makes you say you have slow reflexes and reaction times?
     
  4. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Invest $200 or so into an MSF basic riding course and see whether or not you have the facilities to ride a bike.
     
  5. okie

    okie GT Mayor

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    I can't play video games worth a crap and I have done recation time tests and didn't do good at all;P
     
  6. okie

    okie GT Mayor

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    It's to late now. I already bought this;) :cool:
     
  7. Scrounge, beg, boorow or steal the $200 and take the MSF course.

    Reaction time is relative. I'm not the quickest rider, but I use my eyes to see what is going on around me and the more time you have to see something the longer you have to react.

    Do the course, riding beats a cage any day. :)
     
  8. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    It's never too late to get rid of the Dodge and buy a motorcycle. Besides, why do you need "lightning" reflexes? It's not like you're trying out for World SuperBike championship. All you need is to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. Like BikerRN said, be alert of your environment and you don't have to worry about dodging anything at a moment's notice.
     
  9. epsylum

    epsylum Boolit Hoze

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    At least take the MSF course and find out if you are up to it. Can't get too hurt there.

    I think if you can drive a manual transmission car or truck safely, you are capable to ride a bike.

    As for awareness, I find I have a lot more awareness on a bike due to the total lack of vision obstction. Plus you don't have things like radios and other people talking to distract you (well unless you are a Goldwing rider ;) ).

    You only have one life man, do everything you want to do.
     
  10. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    Be careful no to develop a false sense of security by taking an MSF course. While the course is valuable, the actual learning curve for riding a streetbike is steep and dangerous. A few people don't make it. Most people get by on some degree of luck.

    I had to give up the street riding. It was fun, I had fast 1200, the streets were my playground... But just like Russian Roulette, I knew what the eventuality would have been for me. I still do my dirt riding/racing. You got a truck now... Get a fun dirtbike for the bed. The risk for injury is still prevalent, but the chances for permanent injury are significantly less.
     
  11. epsylum

    epsylum Boolit Hoze

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    Tell that to my brother's buddy. He gave up his R6 just for that reason and got a dirtbike. He had it for like a month and wrecked it. Let's just say after multiple surgeries and a couple years, he can finally walk again. He can't bend his ankle at all, however and they had to take pieces of bone from other parts of his body to re-make his ankle. He went back to street bikes.

    Basically, they are both dangerous. One you have to worry about traffic, the other you have to worry about the very random natural surroundings.

    It's kind of funny. I have noticed (not just here, but in general) all the hardcore dirtbike guys think streetbikes are dangerous and the hardcore streetbike guys think dirtbikes are dangerous. The truth lies somewhere in between. ;)
     
  12. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    It's true I've been injured more in the dirt, but who's to know how I'd be if I were still riding the streetbike.

    Getting injured within the first month is consistent with the steep learning curve. I hate hearing about the traumatic injuries, the severity of the damage in your brother's buddies case makes me suspect it was a jumping related injury.

    A persons attitude toward riding influences their susceptibility to injury. I realized my attitude wasn't appropriate for the street. Luckily all I have to show for it is 5000 miles of pure bliss, and no injury. I figure I quit while I was ahead.

    In general I feel that dirt riding is safer since the bikes are usually moving slower and wrecking is usually not a big deal. On the street, any flop is gonna be bad. Plus you're moving fast and nearly every housewife wants to run you down with a 7000 lb F-250.

    Good points epsy.
     
  13. okie

    okie GT Mayor

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    Don't you need lightning fast reflexes if someone pulls out in front of you^8
     
  14. okie

    okie GT Mayor

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    There is an MSF coarse in Tulsa this spring I may just enroll;) :cool:
    BTW I have driven LOTS of stick shift vehicles in my day ;) :cool:
     
  15. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    Not necessarily.

    You gotta account for every eventuality ahead of time, and anticipate the future path of every car/pedestrian/debris within your vicinity. This is how nearly 40-year-old men on Euro-trash bikes manage to keep riding so long.

    Experience also develops a rider's ability to make emergency manuevers in a highly controlled manner, without panic, freezing up, stabbing the brakes, jerky reactions, or laying the bike down. There's been times I've known for a fact I was about to get seriously hurt, yet an experienced rider is compelled not to give up even with the knowledge of the odds. Quite often an experienced rider can pull a rabbit outa their hat, and that's what delineates a novice from a veteran.

    Lightning reflexes account for very little if you ride a motorcycle using the same mindset that a typical auto driver uses.
     
  16. I'm a 40 y/o man and I ride almost daily. Soon it will be daily since the bike will become my work vehicle. Last year I did 12,000 miles on a motorcycle, and that doesn't include the almost 10,000 I put in a cage.

    Trust me, I'm one of the slowest reacting people out there. If I was standing 20 feet from you and you threw a ball at me it would hit me before I could move out of the way, even with plenty of warning. Don't even get me started on trying to catch that same ball. You'd have better luck getting my dog to sing Johnny Cash songs. ;)

    Take the MSF course and then get some time riding.
     
  17. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    I put 21,000-miles on the mean streets of Southern California in the last ten months. The traffic is probably as bad as it gets both on the freeway and on the streets. I've had two close calls but I was ready for them. Most "Holy Sh&t!!!" to other riders are just irritants to me because when I'm on my bike, I'm 110% alert. I see cars and trucks doing stupid stuff even before they can get to me. I don't follow them close enough so that their negligent movements would constitute an emergency for me.

    If you can't see a car that's pulling out in front of you then YOU are doing something wrong. SEE - Search, Evaluate, Escape.

    There was one time where I had to resort to "lightning quick reflex" to avoid a car that changed lane and that was because I WAS STUPID!!! I rode too fast trying to keep up with a group in heavy traffic.

    When you ride in a reasonable manner with total alertness, there won't be any oops or moments of terror because you would have seen them coming.
     
  18. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    FNFalman, for the record I was trying to pay you a compliment with that one.
     
  19. epsylum

    epsylum Boolit Hoze

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    I would say that sums it up.

    My brother's buddy who go in the accident is VERY aggressive. He and my brother whave done flat out on thier bikes all the way across town on the highway (my brother has a GSXR-1100 and he had an R6), tach pinned in top gear on public streets. That was why he wanted to switch to dirt. As he put it "there are no speed limits off-road". I guess he found out nature tends to "limit" you in other ways.
     
  20. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Oh, gee, thanks, that's a funny way of giving me a compliment. I'm only 28 (at least that's what I tell the chicks), damn you!;e