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Chicagos Finest????

Discussion in 'Cop Talk' started by dorkweed, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. Let me understand.

    The video, which showed the entire incident, did not show what Michael alleged to the newspaper regarding the first part of the encounter (that someone opened the door and hit him).

    And after the cops did their preliminary investigation and realized they had the wrong guy, the let both Michael and his brother go. That's when the video shows Michael "respecting" the police by mouthing off, shouting and screaming at them.

    And now Michael is saying this experience is going to make him too fearful of the police in the future? Oh the poor man.

    OK. Got it.

    The Sergeant and his cops are going to get spanked hard by Chicago hardball politics, that's for sure.
     

    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011

  2. Post a link to a video, no comments or questions? Trolling for some cop bashing are we?
     
  3. Let me understand.

    These policemen are so immature and insecure that getting mouthed off to is too much for them to take? They can't be the bigger people and just ignore the mouthy kid and leave? They had to escalate the situation and beat these unarmed non-threats up? And you think the policemen don't deserved to be spanked hard for their criminal behavior?

    Got it.
     
  4. wprebeck

    wprebeck Got quacks?

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    Mm..looks like heaven
    If you think yelling and screaming in public isn't a criminal offense in virtually every state in this country, I'd suggest a refresher (or initial) course in the criminal laws of your state. Also, please post your version on how to properly take a resisting subject into custody, along with whatever training background that gives you sufficient expertise to have an informed opinion on the use of force in law enforcement.


    Unless/until you can do that, your opinion means jack. Kinda like me coming to where you work and telling you how to do your job.
     
  5. Is the moon full or something on CT today? I swear, between a few threads, including this one, I'd swear it was.
     
  6. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

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    How come if someone "mouths off" to me and I beat the hell out of them, or better yet, me and several friends beat the hell out of them, we go to jail?
     
  7. groovyash

    groovyash

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    Well, if by mouth off you mean create a disorderly situation in violation of the law and by beat the hell out of them you mean affect an arrest then it's because we as a society got together and decided that specific people, in this case police should enforce the law, and in doing so use force when necessary but that every member of society should not in order to maintain some kind of order. If that strikes you the wrong way take it up with...err...everybody in society.
     
  8. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

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    With all due respect, how is mouthing off to a cop as you are walking away create a disorderly situation?

    And I would disagree with you, as I would say that public opinion (society) does NOT agree that someone should be beaten for "mouthing off". Even if they mouth off to a cop.

    I believe it is a pride thing. A cop wants respect, and when he doesnt get it, some get angry and react that way.
     
  9. groovyash

    groovyash

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    As has been pointed out yelling and screaming in a public place is creating a disorderly situation.

    He wasn't "beaten" but moreso the force used wasn't for "mouthing off." Force was used for overcoming his resisting arrest.

    Saying he was beaten for mouthing off is ignoring as many facts in between events as saying McVeigh was executed for a traffic violation.
     
  10. IlliniGlocker

    IlliniGlocker

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    No you're right, being angry for being detained gives the officer the right to kick the crap out of you.

    I believe the Waffen SS worked under a similar SOP
     
  11. groovyash

    groovyash

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    Being angry for being detained doesn't give you the right to violate the law directly in from of police and then resist arrest for that violation.

    I believe a child having a temper tantrum works under a similar SOP
     
  12. txleapd

    txleapd Hook 'Em Up

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    Why do scumbags, who instigate these kinds of things, get a pass for being emotional, but cops aren't allowed to actually be human beings? I hear all the time that a cop shouldn't have let his emotions show, but other people are excused by it being their right to get emotional.

    The best part is that the same people who criticize police officers for having a perfectly normal human reaction (even if improper), are the first ones to criticize officers for "not having a heart", or for "acting like robots."

    Can't have it both ways, people.....
     
  13. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

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    There are extremes. How do you defend instances where a cop walks up to a handcuffed and face down on the ground individual and starts kicking him?
     
  14. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

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    Why do scumbags, who instigate these kinds of things, get a pass for being emotional, but cops aren't allowed to actually be human beings?

    Its called being a professional.

    It would be the same as a football player hitting a defenseless quarterback after the whistle has blown. Sure, he is all jacked up with emotion, but it is still wrong.

    It is not excused when someone in the military shoots innocents because he is all emotional.

    I used to work with people who were that way. We would have an inmate secured and they would start wailing on him. Then they would use the old excuse that we are surrounded by criminals and his emotions got the better of him.

    Too many good cops out there to have a few wreck their image.
     
  15. merlynusn

    merlynusn

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    It's simple. In 99.9% of the time, you can't. There is always that one where the guy is trying to get a weapon or whatnot.
     
  16. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

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    I agree.

    I also believe 99% of the cops are good and honorable men (and women).

    Too bad a few tarnish the image of so many.
     
  17. txleapd

    txleapd Hook 'Em Up

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    My question wasn't meant to focus on the subject of professionalism (which I am quite familiar with), but to point out the hypocrisy of the majority of people who come here and criticize officers for doing one thing, while letting others slide (because it's their God given right to act like an ass), and then turn around and criticize officers again for doing what it was they wanted in the first place.
     
  18. txleapd

    txleapd Hook 'Em Up

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    I apologize for the repeated quote.

    I was talking about officers having perfectly normal human emotional reactions to a stimuli, not losing control. There is a difference.

    You also infer that you are/were a CO. So, your very familiar with the broken window theory.