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chest freezers

Discussion in 'Survival/Preparedness Forum' started by Atomic Punk, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. Atomic Punk

    Atomic Punk

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    Mar 11, 2008
    got a 15 cubic ft chest freezer in october for $400 delivered. a frigidaire. has been great for making good use of sales on meat. got some good buys right after thanksgiving.

    have hardly noticed much change in my electric bill. had the setting at about half. has been around -11F . been filling the empty space up with salt water jugs. about 4 cups of salt to a gallon. more stable thermal mass inside seemed a good idea.
    have cranked it up recently because my wife needed it cooler to make icecream cakes. and its sitting at about -30F .
    have been very happy with the model i got. and has been real nice to have a nice ham, turkey, or steak i got a good deal on some months ago.
     
  2. UneasyRider

    UneasyRider C.D.B.

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    Dec 1, 2005
    I have had one the same size for about 3 years now and it has paid for itself many times over by allowing me to buy quantity of sale items. Good investment for you!
     


  3. quake

    quake Millennium Member

    4,114
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    Aug 4, 1999
    Arkansas, USA
    +1. More energy efficient (usually) than an upright; just have to be conscious of the tendency to let things get 'lost' in the bottom.
     
  4. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    Sep 23, 2005
    Los Angeles
    My late father had two chest freezers. Make sure that you have emergency power back up though.
     
  5. coastal4974

    coastal4974

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    Nov 2, 2009
    I thought about getting a freezer but with just 2 people I had trouble justifying it. If I had one, it would be in the garage and it gets pretty hot out there in the summer. I thought the cost of electricity would cancel any savings I would get on sales. If we got the power knocked out by a hurricane, we would never be able to eat that much food before it became gator bate.

    I might reconsider after I get a propane generator.

     
  6. banger

    banger

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    Nov 8, 2005
    Where evil lives
    Simply by way of a thought for you...

    I do nearly the same thing, however, I freeze bottled water.

    The ice creates a stable thermal environment if any power failure occurs.

    The added benefit of using fresh water is that in the event of a protracted outage, you can also drink the water when thawed.

    Just a thought.
     
  7. HAMMERHEAD

    HAMMERHEAD

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    Dec 20, 2002
    Minnesota
    -30? That's pretty darn good. The faster you can freeze something, the better it tastes later.
     
  8. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    Aug 7, 2003
    Louisville KY
    Yep, chest freezers are good. Just be sure you have some backup plan for electricity. A couple of days without power and any savings you might have enjoyed will quickly evaporate when 200 lbs of meat thaws all at once... If you don't have a generator you might want to avoid filling it because your only the next windstorm, tornado, hurricane away from a backyard BBQ for you an fifty of your closest friends.
     
  9. UneasyRider

    UneasyRider C.D.B.

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    Dec 1, 2005
    I live in Florida too and there are only two of us so it's about the same. I keep mine in the garage and my electric bill is squat with or without it, $60 average and we never open a window... always run heat or air (high tech house!), don't buy a door type though because the cold air falls right out the bottom when you open the door.
     
  10. coastal4974

    coastal4974

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    Nov 2, 2009
    Holy crap! Ours runs about $200.

    It's interesting to hear that these freezers didn't add much to the bills.
     
  11. Hummer

    Hummer Big Member

    2,180
    2
    Mar 16, 2003
    Western Colorado
    If you hunt western big game a chest freezer is a necessity. We also have a good sized garden and fruit trees that produce enough food for several months of meals. We run two chest freezers (and two refrigerator freezers), somehow manage to keep them mostly full and rotate food. A freezer is fundamental for self sufficiency.

    I do have generator backup but have never had to use it. A full chest freezer can keep meats frozen for a day or so. If we were looking at long term power outage I'd begin canning and dehydrating freezer items as quickly as possible.
     
  12. Atomic Punk

    Atomic Punk

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    Mar 11, 2008
    i thought about the fresh water. but i have some stored elsewhere. and the gallon jugs of what are basically brine are denser than fresh water. was hoping it would make a little more frozen mass per volume than fresh water. power outage in my area are not very common and usually very short. i have no idea when the last time tap water was not available around here.
     
  13. UneasyRider

    UneasyRider C.D.B.

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    Dec 1, 2005
    A couple of years ago we bought new windows with the double pane laminated glass and insulated steel doors, we also got a high SEER AC unit with a heat pump and we cut our electric bill more than 50 percent. Oh, also insulated the garage including the door.

    It all started when I wanted to replace my plywood hurricane shutters with something better and found out that I was more than half way to new windows that met the Miami Dade hurricane code, so we just did it.
     
  14. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    Aug 7, 2003
    Louisville KY
    The thing about chest freezers and loss of 'tricity is that you don't need to keep them powered 24 hrs a day for them to work. Run the generator a couple of times a day for 3-4 hours at a pop and you'll manage to squeak by and nothing will defrost.

    Avoid opening the thing as much as possible. Use a remote cooking thermometer to monitor the temp
     
  15. sebecman

    sebecman

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    Jun 13, 2008
    Maine
    Most (if not all) home owners insurance policies will cover the cost of food (in fridge or freezer) lost during an extended outage.
     
  16. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

    9,690
    1,141
    Aug 7, 2003
    Louisville KY

    And recoup the cost over the next couple of years when they raise your homeowners premiums. :tongueout:
     
  17. We use 2, a 9cuft and a 11cuft. The 9 is all venison, the 11 has a bit of venison and then the usual pizza's and pork chops and frozen itailan bread and corn on the cob, etc..
     
  18. randyr5

    randyr5

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    Apr 16, 2009
    Michigan
    Have a chest freezer and a vacuum sealer. That combination works well for me.
     
  19. sebecman

    sebecman

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    Jun 13, 2008
    Maine
    It's been 13 years and mine didn't go up after the ice storm when I lost both freezers and the fridge.
     
  20. AimZeroed

    AimZeroed

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    Sep 29, 2005
    Texas
    We've had ours for about 3 years and love it. We do keep a couple gallon jugs of water in it for mass. We keep it in the garage in the fall and winter months then move it inside the house for the summer. Save about $30 a month on our electric bill by doing so.