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Chambered Glock in Holster Question

Discussion in 'Carry Issues' started by redwhiskeypete, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. redwhiskeypete

    redwhiskeypete

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    Oct 17, 2013
    It seems people ether hate or love glocks and there is a lot of misinformation out there. My question is most accidental discharges are when the glock is holstered or unholstered so can I assume that once the chambered glock is set in the holster chance of accidental discharge is almost nil?
    Also I have seen on other sites that the blackhawk Serpa Holster was not allowed at some gun ranges in the past because of the claim they were unsafe. Only thing I can think of is the small tension release button would some how pull the trigger which seems highly unlikely.
    I guess I just need confidence in carrying a weapon with out a external safety but I love the glocks for their rugged simplicity. I guess what Im asking is unless you pull the trigger the glock will not discharge?
     
  2. Magmag

    Magmag

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    Jun 9, 2013
    I don't know about the holster you mentioned, but, I would have to say 99.999% of all accidental discharges are because someone had their booger hook on the trigger when they should not have. Modern guns just don't fire on their own, someone had to make it happen.
     


  3. Glock 23 Nutter

    Glock 23 Nutter

    1,712
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    Jul 28, 2010
    You are misinformed, my friend...

    GLOCKs Do have an External Safety.

    [​IMG]

    :supergrin:




    Nutter
     
  4. Mahalo_.32

    Mahalo_.32 Patriot

    384
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    Oct 3, 2009
    The Desert
    My G32 has been in the same BH serpa for 8 years, I have been in fights and miscellaneous altercations without any mishaps. When you go to unholster your weapon from that holster your index finger rides along the slide/receiver gap plenty far away from the bang switch! I WILL NOT use the word NEVER but I WILL say it is unlikely to have a mishap with that holster..... I know a few ranges like FRONT SIGHT do NOT allow this holster on their range.
     
  5. redwhiskeypete

    redwhiskeypete

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    Oct 17, 2013
    Mahalo I'm just trying to get your input. Why don't you think those ranges won't allow this holster?
     
  6. This was why they banned them.
    One bad apple ya know...

    [ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3kJ6SU3ycs"]Derek "Tex" Grebner Shoots Himself In The Leg - YouTube[/ame]
     
  7. gunowner1

    gunowner1

    1,330
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    Jul 11, 2011
    Jensen Beach
    I was leary when I first started carrying a Glock. After carrying for a while you get used to it. It will not go off unless the trigger is pulled. I ride go carts with my Glock loaded in my Comp Tac holster and never had an AD.
     
  8. Mahalo_.32

    Mahalo_.32 Patriot

    384
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    Oct 3, 2009
    The Desert
    I did not ask them about it, I just read it in the rule book when I signed up for my membership. Most likely they had a failure with one and the owner made a decision...... Just like another outfit says, "they don't want any Buck Rogers stuff done to your gun"
     
  9. The GLOCK is a tool just like a hammer is a tool. Hammers don't pound nails by themselves and the GLOCK won't fire unless the trigger is pulled. Compared to some other pistols the trigger guard on a GOCK is set up so it's easy to put your finger into it-the opening is larger. You have to train yourself to keep your finger along side of the frame when the gun is drawn. The first thing most people do when they handle a gun is to put their finger into the trigger guard and on the trigger. With a loaded pistol this is dangerous with any brand. Hollywood adds fuel to this by showing situations in movies & on TV where the actors have their fingers in the trigger no matter what their doing. People always want to blame the gun not their lack of training. When my friend & I teach CPL classes we always drive home the point to keep your finger off the trigger until you're ready to fire. We stress practice drawing an unloaded pistol in front of a mirror until it becomes natural to keep the index finger along the frame. Better to make a mistake practicing drawing an unloaded pistol rather than with a loaded pistol. This video would make a great training video for our class.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
  10. Z71bill

    Z71bill

    15,131
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    Feb 19, 2007
    Texas
    I can't see why the gun went off - it looks like his finger is not even on the trigger.

    I say - it looks like - but I assume his finger must be on the trigger -

    Anyone know for sure?

    I went full screen - and then I can see his trigger finger curl up -

    But that could happen with any holster -
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
  11. Z71bill

    Z71bill

    15,131
    2,270
    Feb 19, 2007
    Texas
    I always thought that RE-HOLSTERING was the problem.

    Some guy is not following proper safety procedures - and they have their finger inside the trigger guard - as they try and put their gun back in its holster.

    BANG -

    Glock leg
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
  12. MJB

    MJB

    778
    39
    Jul 28, 2008
    Treasure Coast FL
    Someone or something has to pull the trigger to discharge the weapon. Pay attention to trigger finger discipline and always have a clear unobstructed holster when placing the pistol in its holster. Something like a sweatshirt drawstring inside the holster can pull the trigger when holstering. My G26 is currently in a pocket holster in my front jeans pocket. The gun and holster always go in and out of my pocket together. Of course if I need to draw then the holster stays in my pocket. Practice with an unloaded gun. I always carry one in the pipe.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
  13. Z71bill

    Z71bill

    15,131
    2,270
    Feb 19, 2007
    Texas
    I CC in a modified Don Hume IWB holster -

    The gun is in the holster before I put it IWB - I will draw - but never re-holster a loaded gun into my IWB holster.

    The risk is small - but the penalty is big - not worth saving 5 seconds and ending up with a limp.
     
  14. Glockdude1

    Glockdude1 Federal Member CLM

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    May 24, 2000
    Beaumont,Texas
    :agree:
     
  15. Glockdude1

    Glockdude1 Federal Member CLM

    24,299
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    May 24, 2000
    Beaumont,Texas
    The gun went off , because his finger went to the trigger, pulled the trigger, right after the trigger cleared the holster, all in the blink of a eye.

    Not a holster problem.

    I have 2 Serpa holsters, one for my Glocks and one for my Springfield Operator.

    :cool:
     
  16. Noponer

    Noponer

    1,793
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    Apr 5, 2006
    North Georgia
    I read several articles on this a while back. I owned a Serpa for a G21 that I no longer have, but I had a chance to see what the problem is supposed to be.

    If the shooter keeps his finger straight while pushing the release, no problem. Then, when the gun is clear from the holster, if the finger goes correctly into the trigger guard - no problem.

    However, some shooters try pulling the gun, fail to coordinate the release with the pull & the gun does not come free. Then they begin punching the release with the trigger finger tip while pulling on the gun. When the gun comes free, one extra punch at the wrong time & bang!

    It has happened with surprising frequency, apparently.
     
  17. ranger1968

    ranger1968

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    Mar 23, 2009

    More than one bad apple; this has happened more than once with the Serpas, and it's a fairly well-known issue (if not a very common one) in the professional instructional community...


    But this thread is about Glocks "going off" when drawn or reholstered, and regardless of the rig used, OP, this happens , as others have said , because the person drawing the pistol has their finger on the trigger when they should not;

    This can happen with pretty much ANY pistol;

    There is absolutely ZERO chance of the pistol "going off" simply because there is a round in the chamber.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
  18. Practice with an unloaded gun so you don't wind up on YouTube


    Sent from my iPhone using Ohub Campfire
     
  19. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

    42,027
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    Jan 16, 2005
    Kentucky
    The Serpa holsters were called unsafe because of the claim that people using their index finger to push the holster button would continue to press with their finger when they drew, causing them to put their finger inside the trigger guard and pull the trigger.

    I have never heard any credible account of that actually happening, but maybe there is one. After years of using Serpas, I am yet to have any problem with one.

    Likewise, in 25-26 years of carrying, shooting and training with Glocks, and 12 years working for a law enforcement agency that issues thousands of them and where I am on a firearms board for one of the departments in the bigger agency, I have never heard of any Glock, anywhere, ever firing without the trigger being pulled (this being the internet, somebody will take that as a challenge to make up a lie about seeing it happen, but not in the real world).

    The number of parts that would have to simultaneously fail for a Glock to fire without the trigger being pulled, makes it virtually impossible, without intentional sabotage. Maybe if you dropped is so that the striker was pushed to the rear, hard, at the same time the end of the trigger bar broke off and the striker drop safety flew up into the slide and got stuck, then you'd have a problem but you are more likely to get hit by lightning on your way to pick up your Powerball jackpot.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
  20. RichardinNC

    RichardinNC

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    Jun 13, 2004
    Near the edge
    All it takes is a little study to be convinced that the Glock pistol is inherently very safe. Look at the parts diagram, inspect the inner workings of the pistol and watch an animated firing sequence . Then try to understand the sequence of events, that Bren has described, that would be necessary for an accidental discharge. If this isn't convincing, then a Glock is not the weapon for someone who still doubts.