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Certain casings more desirable for reloading than others?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by DEE50, Oct 27, 2013.

  1. DEE50

    DEE50

    298
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    Oct 21, 2010
    Hello gentlemen,

    I am still fairly new to reloading and I appreciate you guys' wealth of knowledge. I am wondering if certain casings are more desirable than others for reloading? I'm thinking mostly of 357/38, .380, 45 ACP, 50 AE, .308 Win.
    As I understand it there can be rare cases of casing specific weaknesses, and also nickle casings tend to not last as long without cracking and are more prone to getting stuck during the re-sizing process, correct?

    Also, the rare berdan primed is pretty much non-reloadable whereas boxer is?
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2013
  2. stevelyn

    stevelyn NRA Life Member

    I'm not a wealth of knowledge. Opinions OTOH........

    Like anything else a lot depends on personal experience and preferences. I personally like Starline brass for handgun and straight-wall rifle cases such as the .45-70, especially if the loads are going to be on the warm side.

    For working bottle-neck rifle loads I like Norma, Federal or Winchester. For load development and practice I normally use Remington since it's cheap and plentiful in most calibers.

    Nickle cases are merely brass cases with nickle plating. They tend to be a little slicker helping them feed and extract a little better and of course the nickle plating doesn't tarnish easily making cleaning easier come reloading time. Nickle plated cases won't crack any faster than non-plated cases, but as time and use go on the plating will tend to flake off and of course after a few cycles through the tumbler it starts wearing off down to the brass. The wear is most prominent on the case head for some reason.

    Brass Berdan cases can be reloaded, but you need different depriming tools and a source Berdan primers which are difficult to get. In the US, they aren't worth the effort.
     


  3. APERS

    APERS

    367
    145
    May 29, 2009
    Kansas
    I concur with Starline brass, very good! You cant go wrong with
    GI once fired brass; Lake City and Winchester(WCC) is what I find the most of. The primers are crimped, which is a great way of knowing it is actually once fired. I have damaged de-priming pins within my resizing die(Lee and RCBS) because of Berdan primed cases. Both times it was brass I picked up on the range,
    just cannot verify what brand they were. I think they were South African surplus..? Also have reloaded PRVI brass in .45 ACP, 9mm and 5.56 with good results, pretty good brass I think.
     
  4. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

    2,950
    1
    Aug 4, 2008
    FL
    Toss the berdan brass into a recycle bucket.

    For pistol calibers, I have no preference for the brass. All my rounds are made with RPU which can be any brand. Tumble them up, load 'em up.

    For the .223, its the same using RPU brass. .243 I prefer Norma, in .308 Federal. '06, anything I have on hand.
     
  5. Kentguy

    Kentguy

    1,776
    116
    Nov 22, 2010
    Kent, OH
    Pistol brass... you can't go wrong with Federal, Remington, Starline, Winchester.

    Rifle brass... Hornday, Winchester are always fine.

    Just be sure to (and i'm sure you already do this) properly clean and closely inspect your brass. I think you'll find most any brass will work for practice or target rounds but i tend to use the ones listed above for competition or social work.
     
  6. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    8,033
    268
    Oct 19, 2011
    There's a 'sticky' on brass at the top of the forum.

    For 'action' pistol, brass doesn't matter. If I were buying brass, it would be Starline.

    For .223 AR-15 feed, I load what I find and I bought a few thousand once-fired a couple of years ago. A good portion is Federal and the rest is mixed Remington or Winchester. Brass doesn't matter for my concept of a close quarters weapon.

    For precision rifle (where I actually expect to hit something), I use Lapua brass. It is superb! I use it for .223, .308 and 6.5x284 Norma. I'm on my fifth reloading (give or take) on the .308 brass and it shows no signs of failing. It might live forever! Of course, I am only neck-sizing so the brass doesn't get much wear.

    Richard
     
  7. SJ 40

    SJ 40

    13,346
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    Jan 17, 2011
    Vermont
    If I'm buying pistol brass it's Starline and no nickel plated,if I'm picking it up off the ground everything will do except any manufactures small pistol primer 45 acp cases.

    Rifle much the same with the exceptions except I weed out any nickel plated Period. SJ 40
     
  8. steve4102

    steve4102

    2,312
    674
    Jan 2, 2009
    Casings are for making sausage. Case or cases are for making ammunition.
     
  9. So... are any of you gentlemen a wealth of knowledge on sausage?? :supergrin:
     
  10. at_liberty

    at_liberty

    609
    4
    Jun 19, 2010
    Upstate SC
    S&B, possibly Magtech, both by the same Brazilian company, need to be deprimed and primer hole chamfered before usage, else the new primer probably will be ruined, if the press doesn't stop you completely.

    Hornady Critical Defense cases are shortened to accept FTX bullets, so measure any Hornady headstamps and segregate the short ones, until you have enough to justify buying the bullets, which are not currently available in any event. The Hornady XTP cases are good, but you cannot tell them by headstamp alone. All these Hornadys are not typically used at the range because of expense, but you never know. They could be from reloads...maybe not.

    Lastly, Speer cases have given me a fit in .45 ACP because their rims are a little bigger. Those I force through a .45 ACP Bulge Buster, and then they work.
     
  11. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    8,033
    268
    Oct 19, 2011
    Actually, I was stationed in Germany. I specialized in sausage and beer. Lots of sausage and beer... But mostly beer...

    Richard
     
  12. steve4102

    steve4102

    2,312
    674
    Jan 2, 2009
    Yes-sir. I make my own Smoked Sausage, my own Salami, my own Bratwurst, my own Bacon, etc.etc.
     
  13. attrapereves

    attrapereves

    2,099
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    Sep 11, 2011
    Midwest
    Starline is very consistent. I use only Starline for 10mm. For 9mm, anything is fine. Most of my 9mm is range pickup brass.

    The only brass I don't like is S&B as their primer pockets are often small and the case walls are very thick. And AMERC. It's just junk brass.
     
  14. I use virgin Starline for any 10mm "warm" loads. Slightly less warm loads can use starline once fired. All other 10mm gets whatever else I have. Some win and some r-p nickel. I like the nickel cases for practice in any volume since they're easy to spot on the ground.

    For rifles I really only reload .338 Lapua at this point, and I use only Lapua brass. When I start working with my .300 WM I'll use Nosler until Lapua decides to make it again.
     
  15. SJ 40

    SJ 40

    13,346
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    Jan 17, 2011
    Vermont
    Completely forgot about Amerc,thankfully don't come across much of it.
    When I do the case gets a good crushing in a vice or pliers and into the scrap bin. SJ 40
     
  16. Good - you're invited for breakfast, lunch and dinner. I think you have them all covered. :cool:
    Be forewarned... I'm not a 'sir', though. :shocked: :courtsie: :)
     
  17. ColoCG

    ColoCG

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    Mar 18, 2011
    Colorado
    S&B brass and ammo is made in the CZECH Republic and is good brass although you are right about primer pockets being somewhat tight, but I still load the RPU s&b all the time.
    Magtech is made in Brazil with the CBC headstamp and I have never had a bit of problem with it. Speer is great also imo.
     
  18. at_liberty

    at_liberty

    609
    4
    Jun 19, 2010
    Upstate SC
    One should still watch out for Speer, because I know what I experienced. While they may run in some guns, they will not pass gauging.

    S&B are definitely rejects when it comes to priming on progressive presses. I was just pointing out that they can be reworked.
     
  19. DEE50

    DEE50

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    Oct 21, 2010
    Whys that?