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Casting WW

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by steve4102, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. steve4102

    steve4102

    2,311
    674
    Jan 2, 2009
    I just started to cast my own bullets. I have a few 5 gal buckets full of WW, most are lead, some are not. What's the best,quickest way to weed out the Non-lead weights? So far I have been pinching each one with a diagonal cutter checking for softness, what a PIA.

    Thanks
     

  2. shotgunred

    shotgunred local trouble maker

    8,745
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    Mar 1, 2008
    Washington (the state)
    Just throw them all in the pot. Skim them off with the clips.
     
  3. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

    18,083
    18
    May 31, 2007
    Old Colorado City
    Make sure you aren't hot enough to melt zinc (787 degrees).

    Zinc in the mix will ruin your whole day.
     
  4. PhantomF4E

    PhantomF4E

    1,094
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    Aug 24, 2010
    South Florida
    yep keep the temp low enough to just melt the lead and you are gtg. If you are bored glove up and do just what you did with the cutters. You can smack them on something hard, I use an old barbell weight. the zinc and steel ting , the lead thunks.
     
  5. RustyFN

    RustyFN

    2,530
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    Sep 29, 2006
    West Virginia
    Yep, that's what I do.
     
  6. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

    10,016
    1
    Apr 14, 2009
    Conifer, CO
    Set your furnace at around 600 degrees, drop in handfuls of WW's and let them melt. The zinc and steel weights will float to the top. Flux thoroughly then skim off the clips and slag. Repeat until you have a full pot of alloy then raise temperature to 700 degrees or so and cast... or make ingots, which ever your plans dictate.


    Jack
     
  7. fredj338

    fredj338

    21,716
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    Dec 22, 2004
    so.cal.
    Good to see you up & around Jack. ^^THIS^^ Make sure your temps do not exceed 700deg for smelting & the zinc will float out. Some pure lead will need a bit more heat ro melt than 600, but jep it under 700 & you are good to go.
     
  8. steve4102

    steve4102

    2,311
    674
    Jan 2, 2009
    Thanks gentleman.
    Nice to see you Jack, hope things are getting a little less painful.
     
  9. tin snips cut lead easy. this use not to be a problem, but with the new zinc weight it is getting to be a pain.
     
  10. steve4102

    steve4102

    2,311
    674
    Jan 2, 2009
    I'm going to be casting 45 ACP and 10MM Auto bullets. Can I use the same alloy for both or do I need two different hardness. Do I need to get a Lead Hardness tester?
     
  11. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

    18,083
    18
    May 31, 2007
    Old Colorado City
    You can use straight wheel weights (clip on) for both. No, you don't need a hardness tester. My hardness tester is a digital scale.

    You can get away with softer alloy for .45 for sure. Also depends on how hot you want to load 10mm. If you need something harder, you can always cheat WW's and water drop or heat treat it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
  12. fredj338

    fredj338

    21,716
    930
    Dec 22, 2004
    so.cal.
    It will depend on how you are running your 10mm. FUll power loads will do fine w/ straight clip ww. You can get by w/ a much softer bullet in 45acp. I cut my clip ww 50/50 w/ stick-on or pure lead, makes a fine 45acp bullet @ any vel.
    BHN testers are nice to have, but you can make fine bullets w/o them. Like having a casting therm, just makes things easier to figure out when something is going wrong.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012