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Carring a Glock C3 in a belt clip

Discussion in 'Carry Issues' started by dogchild, Jul 20, 2011.


  1. dogchild

    dogchild
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    I've heard all the arguments about carring a Glock in C1 or C3, i carry mine in C3, accidents do happen in spite of training, and that is why there called accidents.
    I've heard the same arguments that you should never carry your Glock in a belt clip, but if your carrying your Glock in C3 why wouldnt it be safe to carry it in a belt clip?
     

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  2. ronin.45

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    I don't particularly care for C3 carry, but a C3 Glock is perfectly safe to carry with a belt clip.
     

  3. SCmasterblaster

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    Just what is C3 and C1? I am uninformed(ignorant).
     
    #3 SCmasterblaster, Jul 20, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
  4. dogchild

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    Sorry, there is a huge debate going back and forth about is it safe to carry in C1, means you have it loaded with a round in the chamber holstered and ready to fire ,if your famillar with Glocks they don't have an external safty, if you accidentally pull the trigger during your draw its going to fire ,C3 Means you have it loaded but there is no round in the chamber.
     
  5. denn1911

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    This is a training issue. No matter the choice, the shooter must practice so the draw and engagement is second nature. I carry with a round in the chamber. I do not put my finger on the trigger unless I decide that rounds need to be fired. Under stress, people sink to their lowest level of training. There is no reason for someone's finger to enter the trigger guard during the draw.
     
    #5 denn1911, Jul 20, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
  6. Wolfdad

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    Extra care must be taken when reholstering a Glock after it has been fired. Also when first holstering in C1. The trigger is hot under these conditions. A restraining strap or piece of clothing could pull the trigger back just enough to fire the weapon !
     
  7. Grovenator

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    I've never heard of a double action revolver NDing before, why would a GLOCK? Keep yer booger hook off the boom switch and it's all good.:whistling:
     
  8. dogchild

    dogchild
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    Thats what she said !
     
  9. dogchild

    dogchild
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    I understand and thats your choice, i really didn't want to start a thread about C1- C3
     
  10. K_Rasmussen

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    C3 is the "get your self killed" carry method. Get a holster and carry C1, s**t happens faster than you can think(proses a thought).
     
    #10 K_Rasmussen, Jul 21, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011
  11. 21Carrier

    21Carrier
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    That's hilarious!

    I always carry in condition 1, in a good holster, but I didn't for a while. It took me a month or so when I was new to pistols to understand that there really is little danger with a loaded chamber. As long as the trigger is covered in a holster, and you FULLY realize the danger of touching the trigger, condition one is no big deal. Just keep your finger away, and it's on safe.

    I also did some testing (with an empty gun, of course) to see how hard it was to cause an accidental discharge by allowing different items to get caught in the trigger while holstering, or putting my finger on the trigger while holstering, etc. In all of the tests, it was AMAZINGLY hard to get the gun to fire, and most things (shirt caught in trigger, finger, string) wouldn't even cause the gun to fire no matter how hard I pushed the gun into the holster. I then realized how obvious it would be that something was caught. I would realize there was an issue LONG before the gun was in danger of firing.

    Wolfdad had a good point. If you ever have to use your gun, and go to re-clip it in your pants, don't forget it will now be in condition one.

    One thing that has always worried me about condition one, and something I constantly try to burn into my brain is dropping the gun. Now, a Glock will not fire from a drop, but I've always been afraid I would drop or fumble the gun in C1, and pull the trigger while trying to catch it. If you fumble or drop a Glock in C1, just let it fall. It's just a cheap, bulletproof Glock. It's not worth grabbing that trigger.
     
  12. Wolfdad

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    Two of the most important words I've ever heard were stated to me repeatedly by my training Officer many years ago: Never Assume
     
  13. Bowtie

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    Apples and oranges. There's a huge difference between a DA revolver and a Glock.
     
  14. SCmasterblaster

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    Now I remember. Condition 1 & 3. It goes back to the days when most folks would carry M1911 .45s. Naturally, there is no Condition 2 with Glocks, but I may have invented one.
     
  15. DWARREN123

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    Depends on your level of comfort and ability. One thing to think about is that often the need for a firearm comes quite unexpected and time is essential. Training and ability = safety!
     
  16. JBarbaresi

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    i can't seem to find it anymore, but there was a video floating around of a guy in a jewelry store/pawn shop and two men walk in shooting. the guy who was standing in the shop (presumably an owner or employee) draws his gun and racks the slide at least 5 or 6 times before he even attempts to get off a shot. by that time he had already been shot several times himself, and collapsed to the floor. the two robbers proceed to kick him in the head after he falls to the ground, take his gun, and everything else they were after in the store. the whole thing takes about 20 seconds before the robbers flee, at which time the man who had been shot tries to recover but ends up stooping over and dieing right there on camera.

    now there's no way to tell what degree of training that guy had, but the moral of the story is that when "it" hits the fan there is really no telling how you will react and what your brain will be telling your body to do. one of the many reasons i like the simplicity and lack of an external safety on a glock, one less thing to have to think about in a time you may not be thinking at all, just reacting.
     
  17. SCmasterblaster

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    Soooooooooooooo true. If one is going to carry C3, then that person must practice drawing and chambering until it is reflexive. It becomes automatic to chamber a round after drawing. That's what I'd do, anyway.
     
  18. highfructosecornsyrp

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    I read a bunch of responses from people who need to learn to read more carefully. You mentioned a belt clip i.e. carrying with your glock not in a holster i.e. the trigger is open to the elements.

    For that, I think you would have to be especially retarded to make a habit of carrying with one in the chamber.

    I carry almost exclusively with a clip draw i.e. no holster. I installed a cominolli thumb safety on my glock and slid a small piece of rubber tubing over the safety.

    I went on a kayaking trip, entering and exiting the boat, even falling into some rapids with my glock clipped at 5 o'clock. At the end of the day, my safety was still engaged...without the rubber tubing, it sometimes would half disengage itself during kayaking or hiking (backpack rubbing against it).

    All in all, I am extremely satisfied with the purchase. It cost about 120 installed, 80 for the safety if I wanted to install it. The rubber tube is a necessity IMO though.

    And as to the guy who said revolvers don't negligently discharge...if you had your revolver hammer locked back and mexican carried it, then there'd be a lot more negligent discharges. If you think your glock trigger is equal to a double action revolver trigger, well...
     
  19. Cruiser1

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    No such thing as an accident when comes to guns, Negligence maybe but no accidents.
     
  20. SCmasterblaster

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    I carry C1.5 and my trigger and striker are deactivated.
     
    #20 SCmasterblaster, Jul 21, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011