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Calling all MTB heads. Opinions please

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by G19Tony, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. G19Tony

    G19Tony Sneet CLM

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  2. frank_drebin

    frank_drebin 1-man flash mob

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    Very low end components on that one.

    Suntour = Walmart level
    Acera = Walmart +.000001

    This matters. A lot. Shifters and derailleurs are the lifeblood of the bike. Racking your sack because your chain jumped gears after a bump is no way to learn about such things. Find you a bike with AT LEAST Deore level shifters and REAR derailleur. The front one doesn;t matter that much.

    Suntour forks suck. bad.

    Also, that bike is a "one size fits all". You need to get a bike with the correct frame size for your build.

    I would get this one for less money and waaaay better components. http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/fantom29_comp_xii.htm
     

  3. 280Z

    280Z

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    I don't know alot about Haro's overall but the weakest link on this bike will be the fork followed by the derailleurs. For that price point on a 29'er it will make compromises component wise. Check out reviews on the MTBr website to gauge how the components stack up. I bought my dad a 29'er back in 07, they really do roll along nicely.
     
  4. txpitdog

    txpitdog

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    I don't know jack about mtn bikes, but my 10yr old Rockhopper has been beaten to hell and keeps on going. Agree with other comments on Deore components. Deore everything on mine except rear derailleur is LX. Indestructible...so far.

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
     
  5. Ferdinandd

    Ferdinandd

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    The bike has very low end components for the price. I bought a Kona Blast in 2005, which came with Deore grade; not top shelf, but it has been very robust and reliable for me. I started my bike selection process by renting a few bikes at a shop with miles of trails adjacent to it. If you have the opportunity, I encourage you to rent or otherwise try out a few.

    Buying used can be a way to get a great bike cheap too. With a MTB, you wind up replacing stuff due to breakage and wear sooner or later. Here's my ride. I've replaced the fork and pedals for an upgrade, rear derallieur, brakes, and chain for wear.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. frank_drebin

    frank_drebin 1-man flash mob

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    LX = Deore +1 :supergrin:


    Acera = Walmart's BEST
    Alivio = Sporting Goods Store BEST
    Deore = minimal acceptable
    LX = Best blend of affordability and quality
    XT = I'm better than you... see look
    XTR = Weight Weenie


    Then you got SRAM.......
     
  7. dakotasdad

    dakotasdad

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    The 29" front wheel ='s smooth cruising over obstacles if you know what you're doing. The other components (derailleurs,fork) suck as others have mentioned.

    If you intend to flog the living hell out of this bike I would suggest moving up a level or two on componentry (derailleurs, fork, etc.) It will save you $ in the future from not having to upgrade.

    If your intention is to ride leisurely about and not murder the bike then go for it, those components are great for leisure riders.

    If you do intend on breaking a real sweat at some point and taking some more technical trails and potentially pounding the living you know what out of your equipment.. Move up in price a hair and you'll find the components are a little more durable for that purpose.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  8. G19Tony

    G19Tony Sneet CLM

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    So much information out there. The advice I was given from a young man at the LBS was; "Pick what you like, and then go one up". That puts me at around a grand for a beginning bike. :wow:

    I understand you only buy quality once. Lot's more to research. Renting sounds like a good idea. :cool:
     
  9. frank_drebin

    frank_drebin 1-man flash mob

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    How big a boy are you?
     
  10. dakotasdad

    dakotasdad

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    Additionally, how much experience do you have riding a MTB offroad?

    You will learn far as far as technical skills go riding a rigid MTB than a suspended MTB any day. You'll be faster and smoother on the trail if you learn to finesse your way through the woods as opposed to smashing your way through relying on shocks to suck up handling errors.
     
  11. G19Tony

    G19Tony Sneet CLM

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    5'9" 210. A 15in frame hits me about right.
     
  12. frank_drebin

    frank_drebin 1-man flash mob

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    Since other people posted pictures of their bikes.... Here's mine :)

    I built this one from the ground up.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. G19Tony

    G19Tony Sneet CLM

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    None

    I rode a dual sport motorcycle for a time, so I have some idea about getting through trails, but I don't envision any super technical riding. I like to look at the scenery and work up a bit of a sweat at the same time. I'm 51 also.

    I appreciate all the advice. Thanks. :wavey:
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  14. Berto

    Berto woo woo

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    If you're planning to use it in dirt, you'll want to have at least Shimano Deore/Sram X7 level components, that will help insure you have adequate shifting under load, at least a 9sp cog and likely cranks with interchangable chainrings.
    The SR/Sountour forks are low end, but better than the RST or bottom end Manitou forks.....Rockshox actually has a decent lower end fork too, if you don't mind the weight.
    For casual recreational use, the Haro would be OK, but I agree you can do better for the money (think: 2010 or 2011 models).
     
  15. dakotasdad

    dakotasdad

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    Tony,

    Its great that you have dual sport experience. That will usually translate to the MTB when you ride on trails. You should have that ability to see the "line" when cruising through the woods.

    Local bike shops are great, but there are better places to get bikes.

    Check here: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/mountain_bikes.htm

    My sister and one of my best buddies bought bikes from this place without a hitch. The bikes come un-assembled so you'll need to take it to a local BS to have it put together.

    Great prices and you can pick your component level that you think you'd like to aspire to.

    Good luck!
     
  16. southernshooter

    southernshooter

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    "Racking your sack" That cracked me up
     
  17. G19Tony

    G19Tony Sneet CLM

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    I've been looking at Marin bikes too. Anybody have one of those? :dunno:
     
  18. frank_drebin

    frank_drebin 1-man flash mob

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    Don't get hung up on the brand name stamped on the frame. Most of the frames are made at the same plants in Taiwan. Just look at components and make sure it fits you. Once again, how big a boy are you?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I897 using Tapatalk
     
  19. G19Tony

    G19Tony Sneet CLM

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    '
    5'9" 210

    Yea, I'm at that point now, that the frame isn't as important as the components. I don't want to over think it too much either. Just find something with good components and pick it up.
     
  20. filthy infidel

    filthy infidel 100% Infidel

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    Do yourself a favor and look for a local MTB club and their website. Buy something used- you'll save money and get a bike that has been upgraded as necessary by the owner.

    A mountainbike, like a hole in the ground, is a thing into which you throw money.


    Buy a helmet and a Camelbak, and rides are all about comfort- some decent shorts are a prerequisite.