close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Welcome to Glock Talk

Why should YOU join our Glock forum?

  • Converse with other Glock Enthusiasts
  • Learn about the latest hunting products
  • Becoming a member is FREE and EASY

If you consider yourself a beginner or an avid shooter, the Glock Talk community is your place to discuss self defense, concealed carry, reloading, target shooting, and all things Glock.

both eyes open/head tilt

Discussion in 'GATE Self-Defense Forum' started by oldjarhead, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. oldjarhead

    oldjarhead

    89
    3
    Jan 17, 2012
    Hi Mas. I notice in your photographs and video, you shoot with both eyes open and you turn your head slightly to the right. What is involved there that aids your shooting handguns better? Thanks.
     
  2. Mas Ayoob

    Mas Ayoob KoolAidAntidote Moderator

    4,704
    377
    Nov 6, 2005
    Oldjarhead, you have a sharp eye, and good "shooting diagnostic" skills! My compliments!

    I'm same side dominant (right handed, right master eye) and in matches where speed matters, I use a technique I call "bridge index."

    I call it that because it's a "bridge" between true point-shooting (body position index) and aimed fire (visual index).

    Find a stance that suits you (assuming locked gun arm; it won't work with that arm bent) and find a spot where some part of your face aligns with some part of your upper arm. For me, that happens to be right lower jawline touching bicep area. Now, habituate yourself to shoot from there. When hundredths of a second matter, the "facial index" contacting the "upper limb index" tells you you're on target and ready to fire without any further hesitation.

    It will also tend to bring the head forward and down onto the front sight, helping you stay focused there. This in turn will help keep upper body weight forward into the gun, controlling recoil better. The advantage is primarily found in speed of the first shot, though it also keeps you locked in for the rest of the string of fire. It's a small, subtle thing, but small, subtle advantages add up.

    It takes a few hundred rounds to get the feel of it, but once you've got that feel, you can appreciate the advantages. Give it a try, and come back and let us know how it works for you.

    Congratulating you again on your good eye for the fine points,

    Mas
     


  3. oldjarhead

    oldjarhead

    89
    3
    Jan 17, 2012
    Thanks Mas. I will try it. I am always looking for something that works better, particularly shooting under stress, in case I have to defend myself. I will let you know how it works for me soon.