close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Welcome to Glock Talk

Why should YOU join our Glock forum?

  • Converse with other Glock Enthusiasts
  • Learn about the latest hunting products
  • Becoming a member is FREE and EASY

If you consider yourself a beginner or an avid shooter, the Glock Talk community is your place to discuss self defense, concealed carry, reloading, target shooting, and all things Glock.

Bikers I need your help (crotch rockets)

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by Black Cloud, Apr 22, 2008.

  1. I am currently researching different manufactures, and would like to know, which one would you recommend. Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, etc.
    Also, what type of mileage would I get, if I drive one of these conservatively? Now that gas is getting so high, I have found a good excuse to get one (had to convince my wife).

    Thanks,
    Smitty
     
  2. paul-s

    paul-s

    16
    0
    Feb 27, 2008
    p'cola fl
    all of the big four kaw-hon-yam-suz-put out good bikes it depends on your skills, size and if the wife likes to ride. for a large bike commuter i like the kaw zrx eddie lawson replica or suz bandit lots of power and comfort. i rode my ninja 300mi straight and the comfort just isn't there. i'm dragstrip only on the 12 with a hog for puttin.
     


  3. GixxerSixxer

    GixxerSixxer Phil Deez Nutz

    702
    0
    Jul 6, 2005
    SLC, Utah
    Yamaha YXF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R600, and Kawassaki ZX-6R are all oriented for the track. That means the clip-ons will be low, the riding position will be aggressive. The GSX-R600 will be the most aggressive riding position. In reality you can't tell a whole lot between the ride position if you're new.

    The R6 is the most track aggressive bike. It's prone to headshake because of the short rake. However, the short rake also makes it a very flickable bike. The R6 is also nice and slender. It has looks that other bikes can't touch.

    The GSX-R is the all round sweet bike. It has track aggressiveness and good street feel. The GSX-R is also known as the most common squid bike because it's such a popular and dominating machine. All the uneducated newbies want a GSX-R.

    I can't offer much on the Kawisaki ZX-6R or the 636. I'm not a big Kawisaki guy.

    The Honda CBR-600RR is a track bike but Honda has seen how about 5% of the sportbike bought are ridden on the track. They decided to make the 600RR more street friendly but retain the track bike feel. The Honda will have more torque in the low RPMs. The other bikes like to wound up to get power output. My 2003 GSX-R600 will hit the powerband around 8000 RPM.

    The 600RR has clip-ons that are a bit less aggressive than the others. This is something that can be noticed by a new guy.

    Saving gas all depends on how much you twist your wrist and other factors like tire pressure, air filter, etc. My gas mileage will vary from 26 MPG to 47 MPG all depending on what I was doing during the week. Typically I can get 130 miles before my low fuel light comes on. I think there is 1 gallon left when the light comes on and the tank is a 4.76 gallon tank. So I'm getting around 34MPG.

    A sportbike sadly won't save you a lot of money. You'll need to buy a rear stand, and a front stand. Preferably get a front stand that lifts from the triple tree so you can service your forks yourself. That is at minimum of $150 in stands. Tires will last 4-5K miles then you'll need new ones. If you solely commute you can go get The Michelin Pilot Power 2CT that is harder in the center patch so you don't square off the tire.

    You'll need chain lube and kerosene to maintain the chain. Plan on changing the oil every 3K miles and servicing the chain every 350 miles. You can go cheap and replace the oil filter every other time. The brakes need to be bled every year. Preferably twice a year. Once at the beginning of the season and once in the middle. Change the coolant at the beginning of the year. Fork oil should be changed every two years.

    Insurance will also be expensive unless you're over 25 and/or married with kids. The "R" makes it a race bike and the insurance companies know it. You can cheap out and go with liability only but sportbikes are often stolen and motorcycles in general aren't seen by people in cars so they get hit. Check insurance quotes before you buy. Going with a smaller displacement bike will lower insurance rates as well. Besides, it's ill advised for a new guy to start on a 600 sportbike. Current production 600cc sportbikes are putting out more HP than the 1000cc bikes were a decade ago. The bikes are also lighter so the power to weight ratio is huge. 10 years ago it was ill advised for a new guy to start on a 600cc bike.

    Most bikes take 87 octane minmum. Unless specified you're wasting money by using premium fuel. It won't make more HP or better fuel efficiency.

    Someone will probably recommend the SV-650 but it's a V-twin so it sucks gas. If you want a gas saver the SV won't be it no matter how awesome the bike is for a learner bike. I love the SV but that's its downside. The SV is great as a starter bike but with your criteria it won't fit well.

    With that said, I suggest you stay clear of the Sportbikes for gas savings unless you go with a an inline twin like the Kawi 650 or go with the Suzuki GS500, Kawi Ninja 250 or Ninja 500. Those bikes will get decent gas mileage and they don't dent the wallet badly. They are easy to find used as well.

    Another option is to drop the sportbike idea and look into cruiser bikes. There are alot that will get 45+ MPG. Insurance will be cheaper and the tires will last longer. Unless the bike is un-godly heavy the bike will also be easier to do low-speed stuff on. Sportbikes have a tendency to make you lock out the handle bars in slow speed so you need to really control the clutch and body position.

    No matter what you'll need gear which will cost at minimum $750. You'll want a leather jacket, gauntlet style gloves, a helmet, and boots that give ankle support.
     
  4. hagar

    hagar Millennium Member

    1,143
    0
    Sep 7, 1999
    Columbia, SC
    I'd be hard pressed to find anything today to replace my 1997 Kawasaki ZX11, except maybe the new 1400 Kawa tourer. I have 13,700 miles on mine, and I'm on my 3rd battery in 11 years, second set of tires (I got over 10,000 miles on both front and rear tire), my chain is still perfect, and it gets between 44 and 52 miles per gallon, and I have not spent a dime on repairs on the bike. Tune-ups yes, I just had the carburetors cleaned and rebuilt because I don't get the time to drive it much. But honestly, I have not had to replace a single part that broke by itself, or even a blown fuse or bulb. I would not trade it for any of these crocth rockets now at the dealers. The ZX11 is a bike that you could easily do 500 or more miles per day and be comfortable.
     
  5. hopeitsfast

    hopeitsfast

    135
    0
    Mar 1, 2008
    I ride a zx14, i'm 6'2" @ 250lbs. I commute on my bike if the weather allows. I ride it hard on the weekends or evenings. If cruising i get about 37-42 mpg. The number goes down fast if your getting on it. Very comfortable seating position,plenty of leg room,very smooth motor and all the power you could want. B.T.W., gas prices was my excuse also. Also try state farm insurance. I pay about 600 a year,full coverage,31yrs old and it's the only vehicle on the policy.(would be cheaper if i added the other cars and house but use AAA for them)
     
  6. hopeitsfast

    hopeitsfast

    135
    0
    Mar 1, 2008
    I should add that my commute is about 200 miles round trip and i get about 5k miles on the rear tires and about 9-10k miles on the front.
     
  7. I know that crotch rockets look fun, but something with a less aggressive riding position may be better suited for daily use.

    BTW It's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow.:supergrin:
     
  8. GixxerSixxer

    GixxerSixxer Phil Deez Nutz

    702
    0
    Jul 6, 2005
    SLC, Utah
    Wow, that's got you filling up daily doesn't it?
     
  9. I know that crotch rockets look fun, but something with a less aggressive riding position may be better suited for daily use.

    BTW It's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow.:supergrin:
     
  10. Thanks for telling me about your bikes and experiences. Especially paul-s, and GixxerSixxer, who helped a lot. Also thanks GixxerSixxer, for knocking out 60% of my research. :wow:
    I was looking into scooters, but occasionally, I might have the need for speed. I only live 10 miles from work, but want something I can take to the track on the weekends.

    Thanks again,
    Smitty
     
  11. sixer

    sixer Member

    33
    0
    Jul 28, 2007
    Aridzona
    First off I know its not a crotch rocket. But have you considered the DRZ400 suppermotard. Bulletproof engine, good mpg, can be used on the track, fun to ride, and with a few small changes can be pretty quick.
     
  12. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

    50,526
    3,282
    Oct 23, 2000
    California & New Mexico, US
    Aprilia Tuono - plenty of power to do damage on the track, plenty of handling to run ring around the best Japanese sport bikes. Comfortable for daily grinds. With a set of saddlebags on, it will do touring duties. Bulletproof engine and excellent build quality unlike your typical Eye-tie products.

    It ain't cheap. And the gas mileage sucks ass at around 32-MPG, but then she always cruises at around 90 or so.

    If you want cheap commute, get a cheap, used bike. If you're going to buy a crotch rocket then get used to the fact that the maintenance is intensive and expensive, and so's the insurance.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  13. ManNamedJed

    ManNamedJed

    308
    0
    Aug 14, 2006
    Reno, NV
    Uhm, my wifes SV650 gets 55mpg. What is your definition of good mileage? There are many advanced riders who love the SV, so its unfair to pigeonhole it as a starter bike.
     
  14. GixxerSixxer

    GixxerSixxer Phil Deez Nutz

    702
    0
    Jul 6, 2005
    SLC, Utah
    Don't get all butt hurt because I said the SV was a starter bike. It's just like 9mm is the starter pistol round :tongueout:. Go to any sportbike forum and you'll find the Ninja 250, Ninja 500, GS500, and SV-650 are the most recommended starter sportbikes.

    I'm not hating on the SV. It's a good capable bike. That's not to say it doesn't have its down sides. The suspension is weak and brakes aren't the greatest. If you're over 130lbs the SV has too soft of a suspension. There is a reason why SV racers swap out the suspension first thing. The SV also offers the Italian V-twin sound and feel at a cheap price. Lots of guy would jump at the opportunity to take a Ducati or Aprilia in a trade for their SV, so much for the loyalty.

    It has torque in the low-end but lacks the top-end that 600cc I4's provide. It's a greater starter sportbike because of that. You don't have to rev it up and slip the clutch to do low speed parking lot moves. It also limits the max speed the user can get. It's much more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow. It will teach the fundamentals and it's pretty forgiving when allowing learning to happen. Ultimately, many who want a sportbike want one for the speed and the speed provided by the SV is beaten by the I4 600cc bikes. So riders sell their SV, move from their starter bike and upgrade.

    The fuel injected SV's benefited with better fuel economy the carb'd bikes aren't that hot. If all that's done is putter around sure the bike will get great gas mileage. Consistently over 45 MPG no matter how hard the riding is what I'd consider good gas mileage. The Ninja 250 WILL provide that. I can get 50 MPG on my GSX-R600 but I don't want to shift at 4K RPM and have to run through all the gears and be bogging the throttle. It's all how the bike is ridden. A male under 30yo isn't likely to keep the tach needle from touching the red often just for the thrill.
     
  15. asu-g23

    asu-g23

    78
    0
    Jan 29, 2008
    IMO you cant beat a honda VFR800 for comfort in a sport-"touring"( its a lot more sport oriented) bike
    and the ins. is cheaper than a full on sport bike. I can keep up with all my buddies on their sport bikes through the twistys the might beat me on the strait but it just means the cop will be too busy with them to get me
    [​IMG]
     
  16. 357glocker

    357glocker

    1,029
    0
    Oct 28, 2002
    NE
    I have a Yamaha YZF600R that is more of a sport touring bike than an actual crotch rocket. It is very comfortable to commute on for me and has plenty of power to play with. It won't keep up with the liter bikes on the straight streches but I don't really care about that a whole lot.

    If you want a bike strictly for economy I'd say your going to be disapointed. Extra payments unless you buy outright, but still you have the money into the bike. You have insurance, maintenance costs, yearly registration ($75 for mine in Nebraska other states usually not a big issue), riding gear and if you ride outside of commuting using that extra gas. Not trying to talk you out of bike and if you want one by all means have some fun it, just don't expect to save money is all I'm saying.
     
  17. I will search it this afternoon, thanks.

    I love the pictures of all these beautiful bikes. Keep them coming.
     
  18. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

    50,526
    3,282
    Oct 23, 2000
    California & New Mexico, US
    Let's start with budget and what your expectations are.

    There are about a dozen different types of crotch rockets that cost anywhere between 8-grands and eighty-grands.
     
  19. ManNamedJed

    ManNamedJed

    308
    0
    Aug 14, 2006
    Reno, NV
    Well the OP seems to be new to riding, and wants good gas mileage. You discourage him from an SV saying it gets poor mileage, which is untrue, then proceed to talk up the high end of a race bike. What is up with that? Are you also the guy who tells new shooters they MUST have a .45?

    The SV is often called a starter bike and lumped in with the other models you mentioned. One big difference is, most SV riders do not outgrow their bikes in a year. My wife is 110lbs and was ready for something better after a year on a Ninja 250. She is thrilled with her SV and has no plans for anything different (and she did ride a wide variety of other bikes, including a some I4 600cc race bikes).

    The suspension and brakes may not be up to the standards of of a true race bike, but they are more than sufficient for the average rider. Yes a lot of people upgrade them, but then again a lot of people put carbon fiber stickers on their bikes too.

    To the OP - consider an SV650. Its a good all around sporty bike that is reliable and gets good mileage. If you develop some riding skills you will no problems hanging out with the racerboys.
     
  20. xring04

    xring04 On the Right.

    1,235
    0
    Dec 3, 2004
    East Tn.
    I love my honda 919, and if my wife could do 300 mile + rides on the back I would love to keep it.

    Bullet proof engine, 109 hp

    Comfortable with excellent handling and brakes.

    Mine is for sale.

    http://www.wristtwisters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12246

    Plus that is a great website with tons of info.