AR15 Conversion: .338 Lapua vs .50 bmg

Discussion in 'Black Rifle Forum' started by bigmoney890, May 1, 2012.


  1. I was fantasy shopping earlier this afternoon (as usual) and was browsing around a long range hunting website. I stumbled across a Savage rifle chambered in the .338 Lapua magnum, and I was amazed at the price, just under 1k. I just naturally figured a rifle chambered in such a specific and powerful cartridge would be well over 3k. Then I started to look up .50bmg rifles just for giggles as well. To my amazement again, I found some sites with .50bmg upper conversion for the AR-15 for around $1400. I naturally thought the same thing about the .50bmg, that it would be a very expensive rifle. Also on the same site with the .50 conversion, the upper could also be chambered in .415 Barret, .408 Cheytec, and the and .338 Lapua. I'm not sure why, but im shocked that these rounds have made their way to the AR platform, and i'm glad. Now it's letting guys with normal sized wallets venture into extreme long range hunting/shooting.

    Strictly based on performance of the round, which would you guys prefer for out to 1k+ meters and why? Of course cost is a major factor shooting that far, with match grade ammo at several dollars per round, optics, etc., but right now i'm talking strictly projectile performance. Any help is appreciated!
     

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    #1 bigmoney890, May 1, 2012
    Last edited: May 1, 2012
  2. Just to let you know .338-06 and .338 lapua magnum are 2 completely different rounds. .338-06 is just a necked up 30-06 cartridge whereas .338 lapua is a necked down .416 rigby case.
     

  3. Thank you sir, I fixed my post. I guess i was a little overwhelmed with the .338 since there are about 6 different names for 6 different rounds that are all .338 :rofl:
     
    #3 bigmoney890, May 1, 2012
    Last edited: May 1, 2012
  4. I know what you mean, there's also a .338 federal which is a .338-08 there is a .338x57 and so on. Confusing as heck.
     
  5. ....338 win mag, .338 ultra mag, .338 marlin express. It's ridiculous!
     
  6. 50 must be brutal on an AR lower.
     
  7. Projectile performance? What are you shooting at? What are your standards?
     
    #7 surf, May 1, 2012
    Last edited: May 1, 2012
  8. Not really. The muzzle brake is very efficient. The recoil impulse is no more than shooting an AR-10.

    There is nothing else in the gun world that I have found that is more fun than the .50BMG. It is really loud, and blows things apart. It is also fairly cheap to shoot, in comparison to other 'long range calibers' using milsurp components.
     
  9. RyanNREMTP

    RyanNREMTP Inactive/Banned

    Same thing with the .50 cal. It comes in many different formats and sizes. Robinson Arms sells an AR platform that you switch out the uppers from 6.5 Grendel to some .50 cal that is not 50 cal bmg.
     
  10. Well just ringing a steel target at a mile plus.

    Not damage or impact, just accuracy at that range
     
  11. The price has me leaning towards that as a "fantasy" gun.
     
  12. Shooter skill, quality of rifle, ammo and glass, and a good spotter are all more important. LaRue has supposedly made hits on military poppers at 1750 with a 20" OBR with 168gr SMK.

    A decent bolt action in .300 Win Mag or .300WSM would also be capable of it.

    Trying to turn an AR lower into something it wasn't designed for isn't the way to go, IMO.
     
  13. With bullet drift and drop-age, wouldn't a round like the .50 and .338 lapua be better for an "in-experienced" shooter? From what i've recentaly read, doesnt the .300win mag and .300wsm have severe drop off and subject to cross winds?

    That would suggest that an inexperienced shooter would be better with the .50 and .338 as to not have to worry about as many outside factors and/or calculations. Or am I completely missing something?
     
  14. When ammo in .338 and .50 is generally $5 a shot and up for decent ammo, you're not gonna get much practice in - something pretty critical to long-range shooting. I also doubt those AR uppers have top-quality barrels in them for long-range work, but I could be wrong. Plus, where the devil are you going to shoot to a mile in NC?

    I can't speak from personal experience to drift and drop issues with .300 WM, WSM, etc., but I know a couple top-drawer shooters that use it for (medium) long range work. .338 is current king of long range in Afghanistan, but ballistics are quite different at 10,000 feet of altitude than 500 feet.

    Unless you have a 1,000+ yard range nearby you can get regular access to (I don't know of one in your area that are open to the public), I wouldn't bother unless you just want a heavy-caliber rifle for blasting away at the range with. Bear in mind, too, that many ranges have caliber limits and will not allow you to shoot .50BMG.
     
  15. You make a great point with the practice part. And im not getting either rifle anytime soon. But in two years when I graduate from App State, I will be moving out to Colorado. Im figuring that there should be ample room to shoot out there :supergrin:

    And as far as the barrel, the conversion i was looking at had a chromoly barrel manufactured by Lothar-Walther in Germany. Dunno if that's good or not :dunno: but by the time i get one i'll be learned in all aspects of either the .50 or .338
     
  16. Then save your money for a rifle built for the caliber. Plus, you'll spend far more on optic that you would on either a conversion upper or a new rifle to reach a mile.
     
  17. I never realized how expensive optics were until late yesterday when I saw a couple of threads debating on buying a scope that was "on-sale and a good deal" for $2700.... :faint:
     
  18. Yep. If you want to really reach out there, it's not gonna be cheap.
     
  19. Well good thing my major is going to pay good when/if i graduate within the next decade:rofl:
     
  20. faawrenchbndr

    faawrenchbndr DirtyThirty fan
    CLM

    Do yourself a favor,.....stay away from Bohica.
     

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