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Any Texas G/T'rs interested in hunting hogs

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Steve Moses, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    There is a ranch in Bosque County (100 miles SW of Dallas) that is offering a limited number of guided hog hunts for $200. I have details on the hunts, and can attest that this place has plenty of pigs. If you don't have a rifle available, they will rent you a bolt-action 7mm-08 for $25 that has already accounted for the demise of several of the hairy beasts.

    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607
     

  2. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    Not yet. The owner just bought the ranch last year and is in the process of getting things up and going. He is trying to develop a strong deer program (there are tons of deer out there), and the hogs are just delighted with all the corn, oats and deer pellets. I try to keep plenty of wild pork in the freezer myself, and can forward you a photo of a nice sow I shot a couple of weeks ago. For the record, I have guided hunters into pigs every single time I took someone out.

    If you are interested in going, we can get there a couple of hours early and spend some time doing plastic worm fishing on his private pond. It is all catch and release, but it is full of three pound black bass.

    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607
     
  3. Roger C

    Roger C

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    May 9, 2000
    VA, USA
    I wish you were closer, Steve, that sounds like a good deal!
     
  4. hcook

    hcook

    219
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    Apr 20, 2002
    Is that $200 a flat fee?

    Is that per hunter or per party?

    Are there any other fees, eg trophy, guide, processing, etc?

    Is that a one hog deal or is it shoot as many as you can take home?
     
  5. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    $200 is a flat fee per hunter. We will guide you in, field dress the hog, and even take the pig to the processor located in nearby Meridian if you want us to. This fee covers one pig of any size, and additional pigs are $50. As this is a guided hunt, I really can't handle more than 2 hunters at a time and be assured of delivering a quality hunt, so 2 hunters is the maximum.

    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607

    The Triangle-D Ranch: Bringing good people and wild hogs together.
     
  6. MrGlock21

    MrGlock21

    2,206
    15
    Apr 16, 2001
    North Texas
    Steve,
    does this offer last for another 2 weeks? I'm living in Tarrant county which is not far away from that place. And as soon as my brand new rifle is broken in I'd love to come for a hunt.
     
  7. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

    1,508
    0
    Apr 16, 2002
    USA
    I would like to go but I am still in college and it will be a year before I can do any traveling.

    I would really like to use my .50 caliber Hawken rifle for a wild boar hunt, would you post back in a year?
     
  8. duncan

    duncan Millennium Member Lifetime Member

    2,263
    19
    Feb 15, 1999
    Seattle
    Dang man!

    I would love to! But my travel will be taking me to LA, San Fran, and Las Vegas. Not Dallas.

    My new job has been kicking my butt. Zero time at the range, no time to shoot.

    But that would be awesome since so much land is off limits in that arae.
     
  9. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    MrGlock21:

    No problem. Just give me a call. I set the hunts up around the moon cycle in order to maximize our opportunity to get into them.
    I am taking a hunter out tomorrow night, and will post the results of the hunt later in the week. Should be perfect conditions, almost a full moon, clear skies, light wind from the North, hungry pigs, full deer feeders.

    Steve Moses
    8173.308.2607
     
  10. Mwinter

    Mwinter I'm MilkMan Dan

    1,208
    0
    Oct 26, 2001
    Steve,
    I'm interested and I'll pass it around the PD when I get back to work (Ft Worth suburb).
    I had 29 hrs OT on the last check, so days off are scarce....but a hog hunt would do my soul good, and I have a rifle I'd love to try out on a TX porker.
    I'll be in touch when the new schedule comes out.
    MW

    PS out of curiousity, is the terrain etc. good for humane pistol hunting? I have a 9x25 Dillon barrel coming in for my G20 next month.
     
  11. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    Mwinter:

    Shooting them with a pistol is going to be tough. Figure a 75-100 yard shot during the daylight hours, and 25-40 yard shot at night. Their kill zone is relatively small, and they are constantly moving around and changing angles. Their sense of smell is incredibly acute,and hunting them can be pretty challenging (and very satisfying).

    What department are you with? I live in Grapevine, and am a reserve deputy at the Tarrant County Constable Office Pct. 3.


    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607
     
  12. Mwinter

    Mwinter I'm MilkMan Dan

    1,208
    0
    Oct 26, 2001
    Yep, that's too far for me to hunt with my pistol in good conscience. The TX hogs I've killed in the past went down pretty easy, but I've always used a .30-06 or 12ga slug.

    I'll probably be using either my 12ga work gun (M590A1GRS) or my Ruger .44Mag bolt action if I make it out there.

    I work in Azle, TX, just NW of Ft Worth.
     
  13. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    Mwinter-

    I have been lusting after one of those .44 bolt guns myself.

    We don't hunt these pigs from blinds, but stalk them instead. With four feeders out there, our hunters' chances of getting a shot increase dramatically if we work all four feeders instead of waiting for them at one. It makes the shots a little harder, especially at night, but I find the whole experience a little more exciting.

    It has been my experience that pigs go down quick with a good hit, too. A gut-shot pig (and they are almost all guts behind the shoulder) will often result in them diving into the brush that skirts the feeders where they are hard as heck to find.

    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607
     
  14. Mwinter

    Mwinter I'm MilkMan Dan

    1,208
    0
    Oct 26, 2001
    Ah, an enlightened soul :)

    Hunt or not, Steve I'll hook up with you sometime here locally and let you wring out the 44 bolt.
    When I was contemplating a move to Wisconsin, I set out to find a durable lightweight 'just-enough' woods gun for general hunting and black bear. Growing up on a bolt (03-A3) I didn't care for levers, and wanted just a tad more accuracy than a pump 12ga.

    That little Ruger 77/44KRS is the proverbial cat's tail. With a loaded 4rd mag and another in a Blackhawk stock pouch, it's lighter than my target 10/22. The bolt is a short throw/short travel, so repeat shots are quick enough.
    With 300gr XTPs (a hog load in 44 if there ever was one), it does thump a bit. With .44sp GoldDots, it's still 100yd accurate and feels like a .22LR. I'm thrilled to hear that it's a ground stalk/hunt, as I regard shooting from tree stands to be more like "waiting" than hunting.

    Completely off-topic, I know you do some work at Rangemaster, etc. I used to work in Shelby County; now that I'm here in TX, do you do any TCLEOSE-certified schools? Our dept is looking at some shotgun instructor and other courses to send me and some other folks to.
     
  15. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    Mwinter:

    We can do a TCLEOSE-certified shotgun instructor course. I would teach that jointly with another deputy named Hany Mahmoud.

    I am very anxious to get my hands on your 77/44. That sounds like such a cool gun, and it would be perfect for the kind of hunting I do.

    Back on topic:

    We guided a hunter last night into about 25 pigs just before dark. I moved the hunter into position about 80 yards distant behind a cedar clump so that he could take a shot with his .270. Hunters always want to shoot pigs with bows and pistols, but we aren't hunting them from stands, nor are we hunting them with dogs, and shooting a slowly moving pig in low light can be challenging. A scoped rifle is almost mandatory. He shot, the pigs ran, but no pigs went down. I asked him if he was confident of his shot, and he said he was. I went down to where he said the pig was that he shot at (I had no idea as to which one he was shooting at) and looked for evidence that he had hit it. There was none. I moved about 20 feet to the north and found some blood that trailed off into some very heavy cover, and it was dark by now. Oh, well, unlimbered the Glock 17 and the Surefire and went tracking. Pigs don't bleed like deer, and the trail was pretty faint, a few drops here and a few drops there. Finally found her about 75 yards in where she had piled up on a dry creek bed. He had aimed for her neck and hit her about 12 inches behind the shoulder. I think he clipped her liver, or we would have never found her. She was almost pure razorback and fully mature, probably about 200 pounds. She was sure hard to get out of that brush! She will most likely produce about 80 pounds of the best-eating ham, pork chops, ribs, and sausage you will ever taste!

    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607
     
  16. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    We will probably do one more hunt this spring. We took a local gentlemen and his thirteen-year old son hunting Friday night. Our guide got them within about 50 yards of a group of pigs after dark, and the young man took a black, 175-pound Russian-type boar with a .30-30. Needless to say, father and son were pretty happy.

    For some reason, the ranch tends to have a pretty high percentage of the Russian-type hogs, as opposed to the more obvious feral type. The Russians look much more menacing and are typically smaller, with a really big boar weighing 250-275 pounds. The ferals have more domestic blood in them and will get bigger, but have shorter heads, shorter coats, and a variety of colorations, including orange pigs with black spots.


    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607
     
  17. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    I talked to the owner of the ranch, and we will do two more hunts this spring if anybody is interested. As MrGlock21 can attest, there are plenty of hogs out there, including some monsters that I had never seen before.

    If you have never done it before, hunting hogs at night is no slam dunk. IMO, it is best done with a scoped deer rifle, although a cool hunter with a scoped AR-15 can do just fine. This is hunting, not shooting, and you can be proud of yourself when you bag one.

    In addition, we are going to offer a "Doe Day" at the ranch next fall to four hunters. Cost is $150 for one doe, which includes a morning and evening hunt and access to the fishing lake during the day, which contains plenty of 3-4 pound black bass (catch and release). The hunt will take place during the late season after the tender vegetation is reduced and during a favorable moon cycle. If you fail to see a doe from your blind during the hunt, we will permit you to come out again for no cost.

    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607
    steve.moses@grandenergy.com
     
  18. MrGlock21

    MrGlock21

    2,206
    15
    Apr 16, 2001
    North Texas
     
  19. Steve Moses

    Steve Moses

    123
    0
    May 3, 2000
    The Triangle-D Ranch is going to conduct a few more spring hunts if anyone is interested.

    On May 28, I took my 23-year old daughter who lives in Phoenix hunting. She has never hunted, and never even shot a rifle before. I showed her how to shoot a pistol when she was 15, but she has not picked up any kind of gun since.

    I spent less than an hour with her on the range about 3:00 that day, mostly dry-fire. I had her fire 6 rounds total at an 8" target from 75 yards. The last one was fired after we executed a practice stalk (I wanted her to understand the difference when shooting from the field).

    At 8:00 that night, we started the feeder circuit. At the first feeder, I spotted about nine hogs. We stalked up to within 50 yards, got her into position, and set up for the shot. She was cool as a cucumber, and waited for five freaking minutes before she pulled the trigger. I was very pleased, and somewhat amazed, to see a 90 pound sow go down with a perfect shoulder shot. If I can figure out how to post a photo of the end result, I will shortly. She used a Rock River Arms Tactical Entry carbine with an Aimppoint and Black Hills 77-grain target ammo. Lungs were just shredded.

    The ranch foreman guided two more hunters the next night. They accounted for two sows weighing 90 and 225 pounds.

    All in all, a very successful weekend. There is no shortage of porkers this spring!

    Steve Moses
    817.308.2607