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A New Method for Disassembly

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by northstar19, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. northstar19

    northstar19

    26
    3
    Apr 7, 2013
    Florida
    I was recently shown a new way to take down my Glock 17, and it makes the process even easier. My question today: Is there any danger to the firearm, using this method?

    Here it is. As usual, draw the slide back a notch. Grip the takedown lever. THEN pull the trigger.

    It works like a dream.

    -- But what do you think? Is it safe for the firearm?

    Note. If you try this method at home, be advised: the slide comes off very freely, even by its own weight, while both hands are otherwise occupied. Therefore, I suggest you carefully hold the gun level, until you are ready to remove the slide.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2013
  2. Mark Housel

    Mark Housel

    149
    0
    Dec 21, 2011
    Arizona
    I have always done it this way? So far, so good. ;-)
     


  3. gooffeyguy

    gooffeyguy

    2,376
    443
    Jan 13, 2013
    St. Louis, MO
    If you have a NY1 or NY2 trigger spring installed you have to do it this way
     
  4. northstar19

    northstar19

    26
    3
    Apr 7, 2013
    Florida
    Thanks for your replies. I just called the Glock company, to make sure, and their representative told me that the alternate takedown method is perfectly acceptable.
     
  5. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

    15,067
    837
    Feb 13, 2001
    North-Central USA
    I'd say you probably touched on the major concern; that is, dropping the slide. Durable as it is, if the slide gets away from the handler and falls on something like a concrete floor, there is a real danger that the tab w/hole at the front where the recoil spring assembly rides can be bent and/or cracked, or the slide rails near the rear of the slide might be bent/crimped closed, preventing reassembly or causing other problems. I've seen photos of both kinds of damage, so it does happen.
     
  6. cciman

    cciman

    3,583
    117
    Jan 19, 2009
    SW Ohio
    What does this save you? About 1 sec, or 1 extra step? Whoopee!!!

    Taking that intervening step to insure there is no chambered round, BEFORE pulling the trigger....Priceless.
     
  7. johme

    johme

    80
    0
    Aug 10, 2013
    Twin Cities MN
    Both ways are fine, it's your slide and be safe.
     
  8. garya1961

    garya1961

    1,322
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    Mar 17, 2012
    NC
    What?
     
  9. northstar19

    northstar19

    26
    3
    Apr 7, 2013
    Florida
    Try both methods. See which one you prefer. Many say the alternative method is easier. As for the safety check? It goes without saying.
     
  10. NYresq

    NYresq

    547
    11
    Feb 18, 2010
    Long Island, NY

    Uhm, no...
     
  11. cciman

    cciman

    3,583
    117
    Jan 19, 2009
    SW Ohio
    Taking something so simple and adding complexity (holding the gun level or the slide might hit the floor, and/or not checking for the empty chamber, and both hands occupied): I am still not sure what it saves you in time or effort.