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44 Mag help please

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Hogpauls, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. Hogpauls

    Hogpauls

    854
    0
    Nov 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Do you seat the bullet to published OAL or the crimp groove? If I seat them (240 gr. cast. Missouri Bullet) to the groove the OAL would be .050" shorter than load data. Also for 44 mag what would the recommended crimp be heavy, medium or light? For now I'm just working up loads but is it safe to assume the crimp would depend on the load, light crimp for light load etc?
     
  2. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

    10,016
    1
    Apr 14, 2009
    Conifer, CO
    There are a few cast bullet designs that require crimping ahead of the crimping groove to allow free cylinder rotation but the majority of designs can be, and should be crimped into the groove.

    As with any other revolver caliber the degree of crimping is dependent on load and subsequent recoil. Unlike semi loadings revolver rounds are susceptible to bullet creep, (forward movement), rather than setback. The higher the recoil the more likely that forward creek will occur. Although the condition does not raise pressures as with semi loadings it will result in cylinder lock-up putting the gun out of action.

    Some loadings, such as a .38 bullseye load, can be crimped similar to a semi by just removing the bell/flare. A SD or hunting .357 would require a more aggressive roll crimp as will your mid to full power .44 loadings.


    Jack
     


  3. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

    18,083
    18
    May 31, 2007
    Old Colorado City
    Seat it so you can do a nice firm roll crimp into the cannelure. You don't want to buckle the case, but you do want to see it roll.
     
  4. Hogpauls

    Hogpauls

    854
    0
    Nov 6, 2009
    Idaho
    So if I seat the bullet down to the crimp groove making it .050" shorter than published recommendations, I am correct that the load should be reduced by 1 gr. because of higher pressure?
     
  5. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

    10,016
    1
    Apr 14, 2009
    Conifer, CO
    Pretty much depends on what your starting load is. If it's just a mild plinking load you'll have no problem with the shorter OAL especially if you're using a medium burn powder such as Unique.

    If on the other hand you're loading a barn burner that is already maxing out, or close to it reduce your original load by 10% or so then work back up while checking your cases for pressure signs. In the latter example you'd probably be using a slow powder such as 2400 which certainly gives you more leeway than trying to push a fast powder past its intended limits.


    Jack
     
  6. sig357fan

    sig357fan

    939
    71
    Apr 8, 2008
    SW OH
    I've always based crimping on the powder type and charge, lighter loads with Unique or Win 231 arn't crimped as heavy a full power load of Blue Dot or 2400, this seems to be in line with what Jack is refering to.

    And yes, as Zombie Steve said, you can see the case mouth "rolled" into the crimp groove.

    sig357fan
     
  7. fredj338

    fredj338

    21,709
    925
    Dec 22, 2004
    so.cal.
    As Jack notes, as long as you are not loading max, & you shouldn't be w/o working up loads, it isn't going to matter. Just seat to the crimp groove & be done with it. With lead bullets, there are so many diff designs, unless you know the exact one, the OAL is pretty meaningless.:dunno:
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011
  8. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

    18,083
    18
    May 31, 2007
    Old Colorado City
    .050" is a good bit, but keep in mind the .44 mag has a good amount of case volume. Seating deeper will still have an effect on pressures (higher), but it's not as dramatic as a 9mm, for example. As always, start low, work up and in this case, you might not want to take it all the way up to the max data you have.

    We might be able to tell you more if you give us the load you're talking about. We have the bullet - what powder and OAL are you using?
     
  9. Hogpauls

    Hogpauls

    854
    0
    Nov 6, 2009
    Idaho
    The loads I'm working up is from powders I have on hand, Unique, HP-38 and Titegroup.

    Unique
    8.5 grns
    1.605" OAL

    HP-38
    6.0 grns
    1.620" OAL

    Titegroup
    6.0 grns
    1.620" OAL

    The dummy round with the bullet seated to the crimp groove had an OAL of 1.575".
     
  10. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson

    4,301
    46
    Jul 10, 2001
    Alabama
    You are not even up to the Lyman STARTING loads.
    Don't worry about it.
     
  11. Hogpauls

    Hogpauls

    854
    0
    Nov 6, 2009
    Idaho
    :rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:That pic is classic.
    Yeah, I knew that would raise some eyebrows. I'm probably gonna go with Unique because that's what I have the most of.
     
  12. ColoCG

    ColoCG

    936
    0
    Mar 18, 2011
    Colorado

    Of the 3 powders you mention, I think your decision to go with Unique would be your best choice. Give it a medium to heavy crimp in the crimping groove no matter what your OAL is, and you should be fine. You've got a lot of room to work up that load. When and if your ready for more you could move on to 2400.

    Have Fun