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$400, start reloading or just buy some bulk ammo?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by ParisArms, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. ParisArms

    ParisArms

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    Aug 14, 2011
    Have $400 that I can throw away. Plan to spend it on something gun related.
    So my question is can $400 get me everything I need to start reloading. Will probably mostly load 10mm and/or 357sig(to start). Here is the thing I want to do it right not just do it to be doing it, so i do want throw away equipment. Want something that is relatively easy to operate and safe. I have never reloaded before. So I don't have anything. I have access to whatever die I need to a Dillon 550 if that helps anything if that changes anyone view on this matter.
    If I brought bulk ammo it would be SD ammo in all Glock caliber, and 223.


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  2. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Pretty easy, lets see:
    Buy 1000rds of 10mm or 357sig factory for $400 & have 1000rds of empty brass or buy $400 of reloading gear & make your 1000rds of each for less than $200. Then you still have all the gear & a life times of cheap ammo. Hmm, no brainer. If you can start by just getting does, you are miles ahead & the money you save form 2K rds of 10mm or 357sig will buy you a 550B & acc.
     

    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012

  3. walrus108

    walrus108

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    Georgetown, TX
    For those two calibers, it's a no brainer. Reload!

    You simply cannot buy cheap bulk in those calibers that is full power, esp in 10mm. And the thing i never got until I started hand-loading, you will be making a much higher quality round than commercial ammo. You can find loads that your particular gun functions well with and shoots the tightest groups with, make a note of it, and you will have YOUR recipe to make. Even if it ended up costing me a bit more than bulk ammo for my 10's, I'd still consider making my own an imperative. I simply cannot buy the ammo that I mostly shoot which is almost as hot as Underwood or Buffalo Bore, but as accurate or better than anything you can buy, for any price. It just doesn't exist!
     
  4. ParisArms

    ParisArms

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    Aug 14, 2011
    So what equipment to look at.


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  5. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

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    Old Colorado City
    Start with the Sticky threads at the top of the forum...
     
  6. shotgunred

    shotgunred local trouble maker

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    Washington (the state)
    For your price point you are going to have to settle on the Lee classic press kit. That way you can buy everything you need and get some ammo made.

    The Lee stuff is bottom end stuff but it will last for several years. For the last a life time stuff you would need to double your budget.
     
  7. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Speed & reliabilty cost money. If your ammo needs are nominal, like less than 1000rds a month, it can be quite easily done on a Lee Classic turret in a couple hours a week. If you want a bit better/faster, that would be a 550B IMO. It will outlast you, been loading on one for 25yrs now, never broken anything. Yes it cost more, but you can reload at a liesurely 400rds/hr. The next step up would be a LNL, no case feeder. It isn't really any faster but some like the auto indexing & 5th stn. The top of the line is going to be a Dillon 650 for most of us. With the case feeder,it easily does 700-800rds/hr. So from about $400-$1100, your choice.:dunno:
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012
  8. michael e

    michael e

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    My "bottom end" Lee stuff has lasted for over 10 years and still going strong. If he has a limited budget Lee is a great brand. So why will my Lee fall apart on me if taken care of?
     
  9. DJohnson8

    DJohnson8

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    You won't have a problem with a classic lee press. I too have reloaded thousands of rounds and it works great. I don't care about pushing out 700 rds an hour. I think reloading is fun and I do it more for the relaxing part, and like stated before you can play around and find a combo that your gun likes.
     
  10. I recently purchased a RCBS single stage press and I am loving it! I've loaded about 2000 rounds on it in the last several months! It runs about $350 for the kit which has basically everything you need except dies (another $50ish for a carbide 3-die set) I'm new to reloading so I have NO experience with other brands, but let me tell you, this press is built like a tank! I'm quite sure it will outlast me! My vote goes for reloading equipment! You can keep it forever!
     
  11. shotgunred

    shotgunred local trouble maker

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    The lee classic turret is the Bottom end of presses that I would recommend to anyone. I have owned lee, hornady and dillon presses. Lee presses are the cheapest but also the cheapest made. Even Richard Lee himself admitted that his presses were not built to the same standard as the other two. He feels his are good enough were the others are overbuilt. Maybe he is right but Lee presses are not even close to dillon standards. Lee certainly does not offer the forever guaranty the other two companies do.

    The lee classic turret is also what will work with the budget posted, were the guaranteed forever presses are not. It is a good press to get started on if you are on a less than $500 budget. By the time you out grow it you will know if you are willing to sink a grand into this hobby or not. When I started reloading I started with a lee turret press because that is all I would spend on a press at the time. Knowing what I know now the dillon 550 is the first press I would by and for most people also the last.
     
  12. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Owning something & using something for 10 years are two diff things all together. Get back to me when you hit 100K rds & let me know if the press still works.:whistling: I do not know why Lee users are so sensative about their gear, what, Dillon envy? It's just fact, you get what you pay for in most things in life. Cheap gear will break sooner than better gear, fact. I own some Lee gear, actually quite a lot if you count casting stuff. No doubt it works, but unless you have actually used better, you just have know idea about the diff. It's not gear snobbery, again, just facts. Buy what you can afford. Save & buy better is always better than buying twice IMO.:dunno:
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2012
  13. DJohnson8

    DJohnson8

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    You guys are missing the TOPIC of this post. He is on a $400 budget. I was too and that's why I bought a Lee, it works great. If anyone is new to reloading why buy a 600/700 dollar press when you don't know of you will enjoy reloading in the first place. Don't get me wrong I'm sure the Dillon presses are great but they had better be for that kind of money. And it's not that Lee guys are always protective of their presses. It's that the Dillon guys are always bashing down on them when in fact they work. Keep your $700 and when I hit 50k I'll just buy another $80 press and have new.
     
  14. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    It's about discussing the options. By all accounts (I don't own one), the LCT will make good ammo for a fairly long period of time. But, it's slow! At best, it is half the speed of other presses such as the 550B and 1/4 the speed of the more advanced presses such as the 650 or 1050.

    It gets down to "How much do you enjoy reloading?". With the LCT, you are going to get to enjoy it for a lot longer! Nothing wrong with that as long as it is discussed up front.

    The cost of a loaded round will be the same, regardless of the press. The only real differences come from speed and whether there is a money value to time spent reloading.

    There is also the matter of legacy. This is almost never discussed but the Dillon presses will last FOREVER. Multiple generations...

    Richard
     
  15. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Not missing it at all. Read it again. He has CURRENTLY $400 to toss but said he doesn't want junk or have to buy twice. JUst giving him options.:dunno: IMO, budgeting for reloading gear is false economy. Buy what you need, but cost isn't that important. For $700, you get a great setup that lasts you until you die. What is $300 more over say 20-25yrs? Yeah, a coffee or gallon of gas a month. I like thrifty, but I learned long ago that cheap tools only cause headaches in getting the task done. If you have $400, you can double that in 1 year of ammo savings.:wow: Few regret buying quality & when you are actually reloading, you'll enjoy it more if your gear isn't breaking or messing up on you.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2012
  16. JLM63

    JLM63

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    I bought a Lee Turret press for $25 at a garage sale in 1988. Use it all the time still today to load 6 different handgun calibers.
     
  17. EL_NinO619

    EL_NinO619 EX-Swage Monkey

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    Its been awhile, Man do I miss these questions.
     
  18. SJ 40

    SJ 40

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    Invest in reloading and shoot for a lifetime. SJ 40