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.30-30 loads for general purpose use

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by MrMurphy, Jun 11, 2002.

  1. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Moderator Millennium Member Lifetime Member

    12,972
    3
    Jan 16, 2001
    Buried in the X-files
    Sooner or later I'll pay off my .30-30 on layaway, and I was wondering if I should use the 150-grain or 170-grain load for Gp use. No hunting planned, just a truck gun, but if I did have to use it on anything hooved/antelered i.e not shooting back, what would you use?
     
  2. TheSniper

    TheSniper Projectile Mgr.

    303
    0
    Aug 23, 2001
    WheatRidge,Co.US
    Heaviest grainage,I like the 170 gr soft points;f ;c
     


  3. Skofnung

    Skofnung Grimmbeorn

    61
    0
    Jan 7, 2002
    FLA.
    and find out which one shoots better out of your particular gun. Mine likes the heavier 170 grain fodder, but a friend of mine who owns the same make and model (Marlin 336) finds that the 150 grainers do better in his gun.

    IMO, heavier is always better for deer sized game, but a 150 grain bullet will do the job with power to spare.

    Good luck
     
  4. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Moderator Millennium Member Lifetime Member

    12,972
    3
    Jan 16, 2001
    Buried in the X-files
    I'm not particularly worried about hooved or antlered game, it's primarily a "truck gun" for the times when I know having a rifle around might be handy, but I don't want something as eye-catching as my AK (.30-30s are really common around here), and I know .30-30 comes in basically two flavors, 150 and 170. It's got a 1-4X Weaver on it, and it's an older Marlin 30AW. I don't know what it's sighted in for, so I guess I will check both types out.
     
  5. Kilgor

    Kilgor American Millennium Member

    142
    1
    Oct 1, 1999
    I agree with the 170 grain suggestion. Weight is good ; penetration is good.

    Plain jane Remington 170 grain Core-Locts work real well on deer.

    Kilgor
     
  6. JohnDog

    JohnDog Millennium Member

    16
    0
    Sep 14, 1999
    Falcon, Co
    Well - if you handload you can get 100 to 130 grain flat/round nose bullets to stuff in your 30/30 cases. Download them a little bit and you've got some nice blasting/plinking ammo that's easy on the old shoulder. Also, Remington makes the 30-30 Accelerator that launches a 22 cal sabot.

    Something to think about - Have Fun - JohnDog
     
  7. I love my old Marlin 336 in 30-30, and also consider it a general purpose vehicle carbine. I'd say get some of the factory ammo in both 150 and 170 grain, shoot a 6 or 7 shot group at 25,50,75, and 100 yards with both weights, and from that see which bullet gives you tighter groups.
     
  8. RonC

    RonC

    333
    0
    Jan 28, 2002
    Eastern NC
    Doubt that it matters. Load manuals state that the 30-30 has taken more game in NA than any other caliber. If ya can hit it, ya likely gonna get it (no matter how many feet it has,) provided it is within 100-150 yards. 30-30 is big and slow vs Weatherby's small and fast.
     
  9. TJC

    TJC "No Compromise" Millennium Member

    1,044
    0
    May 16, 1999
    New Hampshire
    I agree with shooting both the 150 and 170's and see which shoots best too. Especially since you have a scope and can sight it in accordingly.

    Personally, I shoot Hornady 170 FP's in my reloads when I shoot my Pre 64 Winchester 94. Lot's of fun!