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3 newbie questions before I order my press

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by mike g35, Aug 30, 2011.


  1. mike g35

    mike g35
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    I'll keep it short and sweet. So here we go:
    !. How do you set the amount of powder your trickler drops into each case on a progressive press set up? Is it accurate?
    2. How do you know how far to screw in your dies to get proper case and overall length?
    3. Does anyone in the universe use anything besides a Dillon Precision when it comes to progressive presses? What about Hornady, LEE, and RCBS?
    Thanks in advance, Mike:supergrin:
     

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  2. RustyFN

    RustyFN
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    Well first off none of us use a trickler. I'm thinking you have it confused with a powder measure. You have to throw a charge a weigh it on a good scale. Keep testing until you get the desired charge. Yes the powder measures I have used are very accurate.

    The directions that come with the dies will explain how to set up each die.

    Yes a lot of people use other presses than Dillon. I went with the Dillon 550 because I had some hands on experience at a friends house so I already knew I would like it.
     

  3. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel
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    Progressive presses don't use "tricklers". They use a powder measure that has a cavity that is adjustable for volume in some fashion. So they measure the volume of powder not the weight. You make the cavity larger and smaller to get the right charge. It's not hard and very intuitive once you get the press in front of you and read the instructions.

    You just adjust the dies via trial and error. Dillon instruction manuals explain it pretty well.

    Yes, but most people just get the Dillon. This entire question comes up about 3-4 times a month. It turns into a HUGE argument. I am fully in the Dillon camp now. I own a Lee Classic Turret (good little press). I have owned a Load Master and LnL as well as a 550 and 650. I wasn't kidding when I stated in the other thread "get a dillon, all your friends have one". With that list of guns I really don't know how your not reloading already. Most USPSA shooters use a Dillon. By a huge margin. Dillon makes good stuff. I am not going to bash the other products but will say my Dillon stuff is boring in comparison to the rest. I like boring. I don't like fighting a press.

    Read the manual from the site below. Dillon's instructions are pretty good but it's a lot easier when you have the press in front of you.

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/manuals.html
     
    #3 Colorado4Wheel, Aug 30, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011
  4. RRTX11

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    I own a Dillon 550B and I bought it because I could crank out 300-400 pistol rounds in an hour for range and competition, or I could crank out a hundred (or more) .308 rounds in an hour. There is tumbling, sorting, case prep (rifle only) involved in the process that is rarely discussed with reloading.

    I recommend you go to youtube and you can probably watch a video on just about every press there is. It doesn't get much easier that a Dillon 550 though.
     
  5. fredj338

    fredj338
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    Hold on there hoss. BEFORE you even think about buying gear, do yourself a favor & get The ABCs of Reloading or a good reloading manual like the Lyman or SPeer & read the reloading sections. It explains the general process & gives you a much better idea of what you want vs what you need. Few shooters need any type of progressive & fewer still a case &/or bullet feeder to go with it. Some light reading/research will go along way to saving you some money buying stuff you don't need.
     
    #5 fredj338, Aug 30, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011
  6. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve
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    1) Read the directions.
    2) Read the directions.
    3) Yes. :aodnsb:

















    It will all be easier when you have the stuff in front of you. Please read the ABC's of Reloading, a manual or two and the stickies at the top of the page. Welcome to the nuthouse. :supergrin:
     
  7. Beanie-Bean

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    I actually bought a Lee LCT to start things off, but after reading a lot (and I mean a lot...) I made the decision to go with the Dillon RL 550B.

    RRTX11 was kind enough to take time out to show me his reloading setup, and go over some really good pointers in-person, and that really sealed the deal.

    The guys here are very helpful, and I think that if you check out THR and Brian Enos, you'll see that a lot of folks just really go with Dillon reloaders.

    I'm not bashing any other brand, because I nearly walked out of Cabela's today with an RCBS Rock Chucker. I've been reading up on some nifty resizing dies from Redding, and I don't know that it would work correctly in the 550. I'd use it mainly for resizing the .40 and .357 SIG cases, but that's another story...

    Good luck on your decision.
     
  8. ron59

    ron59
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    Mike, I think it was Ed who advised a Dillon 650?

    Great advice. I currently have a 550B but a 650 is in my future.

    1500 rounds a month or more, you're gonna want a good progressive reloader. The 550B is fine, but it gets old after awhile having to load cases by hand. There is a case feeder available, but few uses it, it's more an "add on" than it was the press being designed for it.

    With the 650, the case feeder was designed from the beginning. It works.
     
  9. DoctaGlockta

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    Do yourself a big favor. Read a few reloading books. Buy either an inexpensive SS press/hand press and a set of dies for one caliber or a Lee Loader kit. See if you will like it first before you shell out $ for a progressive.

    Crawl before you walk.

    Good luck and welcome.
     
  10. ron59

    ron59
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    Well, he's already shooting 1500 rounds per month. Mostly of .40. How expensive is that? Reloading on a progressive is not that hard, and saves a lot of money. Not sure "what's to like". AND if he had a 650 and decided he didn't like it? From what I've seen with these eBay buyers, he could probably sell it for twice what he paid for it. :rofl:

    Mike:
    Watch these videos:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRZrbv_8kx4
    There are 5 of them , 10 minutes each.
    Now, he is showing reloading on a 550, but reloading on 650 would be VERY similar. He not only shows the press, but how to work up a load using information from a loading manual, using a powder scale, etc. EVERYTHING you need to know is in these videos, except for maybe cleaning the brass, and that couldn't be simpler.

    Now, while that video is about the 550 and I advised a 650... there isn't a lot of difference between the two. The first difference is that the 650 can use a casefeeder (if you're getting a 650, you GOTTA get the casefeeder), so you don't have to load cases into station 1 by hand.

    The second difference is the priming mechanism. The way the primers move from the primer magazine to the primer punch. Other than that, the resizing, powder drop, seating, crimping stations would all be identical. You could learn a lot about it just from watching those videos. In fact, when I was doing my research, it was stumbling across those that convinced me I could do this. I literally ordered my press the same day I saw that video series.

    I'm sure there are similar videos on the 650, just go to youtube and search:
    But seriously... I'd watch that one on the 550 first as he shows so much of the non-press stuff that would apply regardless of press, and he does it very professionally.
     
    #10 ron59, Aug 31, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  11. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel
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    I told him in his last thread to just get a 650. He simply can not go wrong. Even if he selsss it for a small loss in a year he would still have made enough ammo to make his mony back. It's truely a no brainer in my opinion.
     
  12. mike g35

    mike g35
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    I did mean powder measure not "trickler" sorry about that. Thanks for the info.
     
  13. fredj338

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    There are 1000s of guys shooting buckets of factory ammo every month, mostly because they are afraid to reload or have tried it & just don't like it. Cost isn't the issue for them. So while a 650 is a great press, it isn't really needed by even a 1500rd/m shooter. That is still easily done on a 550, SDB or LNL w/o case feeder. Even a LCT can get you that in 2.5hr per week.
    I agree, buy quality gear like a 550 or 650 & if you hate it, sell it for 80%+ of what you paid for it. I could not imagine anyone shooting 1500rds of factory ammo per month & NOT learning to like reloading though. Just being self sufficient is worth the price of entry.
     
    #13 fredj338, Aug 31, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  14. mike g35

    mike g35
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    Yeh it was Ed who mentioned the 650 and since I shoot so much (you know how much) I thought I might as well go with the 650 instead of buying something that I will be worrying about upgrading later. I priced the 650 and it isn't anywhere near as expensive as what I thought it would be. I will probably be asking you and Ed some more questions down the road so I hope you don't mind.

    I'm through buying guns until I get this reloading equipment. I figure theres no sense in having $2000 dollar raceguns if you don't use the proper loads in them. The WWB I use isn't horrible but I know my guns are capable of more. Thanks Ron

    (thanks for the practice tips also, I wrote it all down and plan to try it saturday at the range)
     
  15. mike g35

    mike g35
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    Thats true but I think it would be beneficial to me to use the same press and set-up as all of my friends. That way they know exactly what I'm talking about if I ever need help. And the 650 isn't expensive at all not too mention if I start reloading I could jump from 1500 to 6000 with out spending any more money than I do now. I just can find a disadvantage to getting the 650 but it seems like evey other press I have read about someone always has something bad to say. Not so with any of the DP presses. And why by the 550 if you can afford the 650.
     
  16. ron59

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    I only shoot 1500 a month and I hate how long it takes with my 550B. In my mind, it takes TWICE as long as it would a 650. I should be able to: lower handle, raise handle, lower handle, raise handle, all at the same cycle rate. But with the 550, when I let go of the handle to grab a case and put it on AND grab a bullet... that combine time Ive lost a cycle.

    When I first started reloading, the actual act was fun. 40,000 rounds later... not so much. If I can do it faster, safely... I'm all about that. Mike apparently wants to shoot as much, if not more, than I do. Why not spend the extra $350 or whatever and be ahead of the game from the get go ?

    The guy has like 6 race guns at $2000 apiece... it's not like money appears to be a huge obstacle.
     
    #16 ron59, Aug 31, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  17. argy1182

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    1. The powder measure systems are typically pretty accurate. I use a Lee Classic Turret and it's quite accurate. Just make sure that you discard the first few charges so that the powder settles and allows for more uniform throws.

    2. I took a factory round that I knew was the correct length and then screwed the die down to match that round. I then used that as a starting point for trial and error until I had the desired length.

    3. I don't know if you're interested in going with a turret press, but the Lee Turret has worked well for me and was relatively inexpensive.
     
  18. Colorado4Wheel

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    Be sure to include the Case Feeder with you purchase of a 650.
     
  19. mike g35

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    Thanks, I will be sure to get it. Ron's right money isn't a huge issue for me so not getting the 650 when thats what I really will end up needing is, like you said, stupid. I knew there was someone else that told me to get the 650 besides Ron and Ed, thank you for the valuable and sensible information.
     
  20. mike g35

    mike g35
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    3 raceguns, 1 race revo., and 3 modified production/limited actually. Now wouldn't you think a guy that shoots as much as I do and has well over 8,000 dollars in his competition Glocks should have already been reloading:embarassed:? You guys ever get that cart before the horse feeling:embarassed:? Thanks for making look at my shooting and my gear from a true competition shooters perspective Ron. I have alot to learn when it comes to reloading but I have done a little rifle reloading on a SS RCBS and liked it. So that said i should love the DP 650.