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.22 suppressor cleaning

Discussion in 'GATE NFA/Class III' started by Irelander, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. Irelander

    Irelander Glocker

    511
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Seneca, PA
    I have a Tactical Innovations TAC65 suppressor and I feel it is time for its first cleaning. I soaked it in WD40 for a few days and tapped the baffles out. What a mess. Anyway, is there a proven method for getting the caked on lead and stuff off of the baffles? The tube cleaned out pretty easy but the baffles have are going to be tough. Whats the best way to clean off aluminum baffles?
     
  2. Zak Smith

    Zak Smith 3Gunner Millennium Member

    502
    3
    Aug 25, 1999
    Fort Collins, CO, USA
    Call the manufacturer for what they recommend for their suppressor (and warranty). For other-than-aluminum suppressors, the ultrasonic cleaner and the vinegar/peroxide methods are the most effective. The byproducts of cleaning are toxic so take appropriate care.
     


  3. Irelander

    Irelander Glocker

    511
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Seneca, PA
    They said to use WD40. That doesn't seem to work very well.

    Do you think it would hurt to throw the baffles in my brass tumbler with some walnut media?
     
  4. Irelander

    Irelander Glocker

    511
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Seneca, PA
    I've been soaking the baffles in Kroil to see it that makes a difference. I thought about wire brushing them but thought it might damage the baffles since they are aluminum.
     
  5. Irelander

    Irelander Glocker

    511
    0
    Apr 17, 2006
    Seneca, PA
    I tried the baking soda blast method this weekend. I was surprised at how well it worked. It took the caked on lead and carbon off the baffles and did not harm the aluminum. I can still see the tooling marks on the baffles. The only down side is that it took a lot of baking soda. I used about 3 boxes of baking soda on one highly caked baffle. The junk in the corners of the baffles was the toughest to remove with the soda. I found that the best route was to scrape as much of the caked on junk as possible then blast with the baking soda.