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158gn reloads

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by capnjim01, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. Some one gave my GF some reloads, 25 years ago, that I don't think she needs to shoot.

    The label on the box says 10.5 grains of 2400, 158gr lead. She would be shooting them from a Charter Arms snub nose, and I think, from looking on the internet that the load would be to hot for her gun. This might be ok from a .357 or N frame but I feel that 10.5 of 2400 is a bit much for a small Charter Arms. What say you experienced guys?
     
  2. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    NEVER, EVER, shoot somebody else's reloads.

    What the box says and how they are loaded can vary considerably.

    I would disassemble them and toss them unless I was planning to reuse the cases.

    Richard
     


  3. That is my thinking. I have "helped friends reload a little and watched someone put a double charge in .357 until I said whoa aren't You using the wrong powder? I'm very leery about some things.
     
  4. Highspeedlane

    Highspeedlane NRA Life Member

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    New England
    I'm with F106...if I didn't load 'em, I ain't going to shoot 'em.
     
  5. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

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    FL
    Shooting ammunition that is questionable is like gambling... Will you walk away from a range experience with all your fingers and an intact firearm, or will you be taking a quick trip to a hospital?

    I've found rounds at the range that I know were not reloads, yet will not shoot them. I like my investments too much to risk ruining them on a chance.
     
  6. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    +1 :treadmill:
     
  7. FLIPPER 348

    FLIPPER 348 Happy Member

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    Bend Oregon



    Um, my friends shoot my reloads all the time. Are they wrong??
     
  8. Kentguy

    Kentguy

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    FLIPPER 348... "Um, my friends shoot my reloads all the time. Are they wrong??"

    I would not recommend the practice of you giving them your reloads, of course whether they choose to shoot them or not is their choice. Just not a safe & smart avenue to travel down, of course that decision is completely up to you.

    A couple of things here; first capnjim01 stated that "...Some one gave my GF some reloads, 25 years ago...that I don't think she needs to shoot."

    Really - ya think?

    Take them apart and let her reload them herself and she can shoot them at the range.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  9. FLIPPER 348

    FLIPPER 348 Happy Member

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    odd thinking

    If my reloads are safe for me to shoot why would they not be safe for others??
     
  10. byf43

    byf43 NRA Life Member

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    ^^^^This, especially IF I didn't know/trust the 'giver'.

    I've seen what a double-dose of Unique did to a Ruger Blackhawk in .357, many years ago.

    The guy used a KNOWN good, accurate load.
    The problem was, he didn't pay attention and put TWICE as much in the case.

    _ _._ grains of Unique blew that Blackhawk to pieces.
     
  11. countrygun

    countrygun

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    So you have no conscience if your mistake harms someone else?

    Not surprised somehow.
     
  12. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    From my point of view, YES! I have been reloading for a very long time and I still don't really like the fact that my family shoots my reloads.

    No, there haven't been any problems. I don't expect there ever will be any problems. But if there is going to be a problem, I would rather it happen to me.

    Richard
     
  13. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

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    FL
    They are probably just as safe for them as they are for you, although those reloads should have been worked up in your firearm(s). If your chambers are loose and you have a long lead, what happens when your reloads are fired in their firearms which may have very tight chambers and a very short lead? Maybe the bullet engages the rifling, greatly increasing pressures?

    IF your reloads were to cause physical harm to one of your friends, do you fully trust them not to lawyer up when their hospital bills start running them thousands out of pocket. Do you think your friendship will survive?

    Do you like your home?
     
  14. Decided to take them to the range and let them take care of them. They have some one who dissembles them and they can have em I'll stick with factory or watch someone I trust.
     
  15. FLIPPER 348

    FLIPPER 348 Happy Member

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    I don't make mistakes reloading. If I trust the rounds I make for me I trust them for anyone else.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
  16. FLIPPER 348

    FLIPPER 348 Happy Member

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    I load 38/357 and 45acp to the same dimensions as new ammo. How would friends using my ammo be any more risky then them using factory new?? My God, some of y'all are afraid of your own shadow.
     
  17. Kentguy

    Kentguy

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    FLIPPER 348,

    I can only offer my advise here based on my own experience and things that I know are true. As I stated before, it is your choice to offer your reloads to your friends - yours and yours alone. It is just that personally I have seen this sort of thing go terribly wrong, and to "close friends" (past tense).

    Like yourself I an extremely careful and try to be as accurate as possible with my reloads, I take nothing for granite. However my reloads are based on what my gun and my shooting talents are capable of, not someone else's.

    All I am saying is please be careful and don't be naive about this, please consider these thoughts.

    I do wish you the best of luck and many many years of happy reloading and shooting.

    Good luck and be safe out there.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
  18. byf43

    byf43 NRA Life Member

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    Southern Maryland


    I applaud your enthusiasm.

    However, EVERYONE makes a mistake, SOMETIME!!!!

    I pay more attention to my reloading than anything else, but, there's that ONE TIME that you WILL make a mistake.
    GUARANTEED.


    I dropped the hammer on one of my reloads in an NRA High Power Rifle Match - Standing, Slow Fire stage, when the round did not go off.

    I pulled the op-rod back, saw the round still in the bullet, closed the bolt, pulled the trigger again.


    Long story short - swapped out the round, continued/finished the match, went home and pulled the bullet.

    NO POWDER!!!!!
    The primer (CCI LR) went off, but the bullet never moved.

    I was lucky!!!!!

    If that bullet had gotten stuck in the barrel, I would have destroyed my beloved Springfield (Nov. '43) M1 Garand.

    People make mistakes.
    Your 'time' is coming. It's not a matter of "IF", but "WHEN".
     
  19. FLIPPER 348

    FLIPPER 348 Happy Member

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    As a professional aircraft mechanic for going on 30 years I am quite confidant in being mistake-free in my work. Loading pistol rounds is not rocket science. I will not have any bad rounds.
     
  20. byf43

    byf43 NRA Life Member

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    Please re-read ONLY the first two sentences of my previous post.

    I've only known ONE person that was perfect.
    He died waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay before I was born.



    And as Forrest Gump said, "And that's all I have to say, about thaaaaa-at."
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013