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10mm 800-X Recipe question

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Kwesi, Apr 22, 2011.


  1. Kwesi

    Kwesi
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    I'm very happy with my current recipe fired in a G20 but would like your suggestions about how to change the load for use in a longer barrel (8.85") gun (hey Jack I said "gun"). My current load:

    180gr PD FMJ
    8.7gr 800-X
    Starline brass
    Wolf primers
    1.259 OAL
    I'm weighing every drop

    I'm not able to chrono these anytime soon & was wondering, since I'm at the max load with 8.7gr, is their a typical adjustment when going to the longer barrel?
     

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  2. GioaJack

    GioaJack
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    Conifer Jack

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    Don't know anything about 10 mm so I can't help ya there but you're a good lad... you're learning.


    Jack
     

  3. fredj338

    fredj338
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    I am not sure what the longer bbl has to do with anything. You can't stuff more powder in it just because the bbl is longer. You will get more vel out of any load running in a longer bbl.
     
    #3 fredj338, Apr 22, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2011
  4. SFCSMITH(RET)

    SFCSMITH(RET)
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    I don't load with that powder, but, if you are at max load, you are at max load. The load data has NOTHING to do with barrel length, only chamber pressure. You may see velocity increases with the longer barrel, depends on several factors.

    That said, every gun is different, even when comparing within the same model and production run. If you want to work up a max load for a or that particular pistol, you need to work it up yourself, paying strict attention to loading procedures and pressure signs in spent brass. then make sure that over max load NEVER gets fired in any pistol other than the one you worked it up in.
     
    #4 SFCSMITH(RET), Apr 22, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2011
  5. PCJim

    PCJim
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    Senior Member

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    Well, if it was a High Point, I've seen video where you can stuff the barrel full of powder......
     
  6. Kwesi

    Kwesi
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    Understood. I asked because I didn't know if the higher velocity due to the longer barrel had any affect on pressure; now I know - thanks!
     
  7. Kwesi

    Kwesi
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    I don't yet understand most signs of over pressure - another reason why I asked the question. BTW: any recommended books that explain, with good photo's, pressure problems?
     
  8. Taterhead

    Taterhead
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    Counting Beans

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    There should not be a needed adjustment for the longer barrel. That being said, if I am at warm to hot loads and change any input in the system, I reduce and rework. That recipe is at a relatively low pressure, so I would not expect you to encounter any troubles with your load reworks.

    If you haven't done so already, make sure that you check out the 10mm reloading forum here on GT.
     
  9. SFCSMITH(RET)

    SFCSMITH(RET)
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    I don't know what books you have now.. you do have at least one.. right?

    I like "The ABC's of Reloading" and actually found the "Lee Reloading Manual" to have an awful lot of great info.. You want to get the newest/latest editions possible.

    Pressure signs include (among other things) distorted, missing, loose primers, breech face "imprints" on the brass, bulged split cases...

    Let me reiterate, if you do work up a max pressure load for a particular gun, it must be loaded very carefully, always using the exactly the same components, and never fired in any other gun.

    Mostly.

    I have a .45LC load I worked up for my Ruger I would never shoot from my S&W, even though I *think* the Smith could handle it, but I have no fear of shooting it in my Winchester rifle.
     
    #9 SFCSMITH(RET), Apr 23, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2011
  10. fredj338

    fredj338
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    Most loading manuals go over pressure signs. If you get to those you mentioned, you are well beyond safe pressures, those are all over pressure signs. Stickie case extraction, diff to determine on a semi, case head markings, extractor groove dents/nicks, case head measurements, extrememly flattened primers, all are indicating you are getting close to the above mentioned pressure events.
     
  11. Kwesi

    Kwesi
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    I just picked a few: Modern Reloading - Richard Lee & while he details the signs he provides 1 photo to illustrate 3 loads and the effect on the primers. Then he says " can you see the difference"? Not really!

    I'd like to find a guide that more specifically points to each sign. Unfortunately for me, I'm more of a visual learner.
     
  12. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123
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    Grumpy Old Guy

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    If that is a max load then it is max for all barrels (chambers). You may get more FPS from a longer barrel but you do not waant more chamber pressure.
    Having said that, if you know your firearm and how the powder reacts then you may get above the published max load but it is on you.
     
  13. fredj338

    fredj338
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    Sort of. Max loads will vary from chamber to chamber, gun to gun, so what is max in my gun maybe fine in yours. It's why we all do load workups. Unless you are loading well off max printed data, load work ups are the only way to guarantee safe loads.
     
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