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100 #s of linotype

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by xdmikey, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. xdmikey

    xdmikey

    373
    3
    Dec 5, 2009
    Cypress, TX
    what do i mix it with?
    i went to my reloading shop and almost bought the pot and everything else needed but decided to wait until i can find a steady supply of wheel weights.
    any recommendations as far as what kind of melting pot and other supplies i will need?
    tia
     
  2. VN350X10

    VN350X10

    6,448
    41
    Apr 13, 2001
    McHenry, IL
    watch out for new wheelweights, a lot are now made of zinc.
    I believe that the EPA has finally managed to eliminate lead wheelweights, or are working hard at it.
    Others here might have more info.

    uncle albert
     


  3. xdmikey

    xdmikey

    373
    3
    Dec 5, 2009
    Cypress, TX
    there's a place in south houston(i'm in north houston) that sells bulk lead(recommended by reloading store)so i'll probably try there but i'm looking for a mixture using the lino i inherited. i've always heard about how great lino is for casting.
     
  4. fredj338

    fredj338

    21,940
    1,051
    Dec 22, 2004
    so.cal.
    Lino makes beautiful bullets, but it is really too hard & expensive for plinking bullets. You can cut it 50/50 w/ pure lead & get a nice alloy that is useable for all handgun needs. It is close to Lyman #2, a bit softer, but close enough. Add 4oz of tin or 95/5 solder & you have Lyman #2. If you can get clip ww, it's about perfect by itself for most handgun needs. A 7/3 lead/lino gives you pretty close to clip ww.
    The problem going forward, states are banning them & the companies that make ww are not going to make diff alloys. So going forward you will see more zinc instead fo lead & what we used to get for free hauling away, we have to pay for & the % of lead ww left is smaller every month. If you can find a cheap source, casting is a great hobby unto itself, but if I have to pay much mor ethan $1.50/# for alloy, I am just not casting my plinking bullets.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2011