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10 Wacky Tech Patents

Discussion in 'The Lighter Side' started by Blitzer, Apr 10, 2009.


  1. Blitzer

    Blitzer
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    10 Wacky Tech Patents

    04.07.09


    Although granted patents are deemed useful, many of them don't seem that useful at all, including a sensor that detects whether you've hit a pedestrian and a clock that tells time in dog years.

    <!-- Vignette V6 Fri Apr 10 04:12:18 2009 --> <!--WEB 12--> Total posts: 1
    by Jennifer L. DeLeo
    <!-- Begin Buzz Block --> <table align="right"><tbody><tr><td>
    </td></tr></tbody></table> <!-- End Buzz Block --> A patent for an invention is the grant of a property right to the inventor, issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Anyone who comes up with a new idea, or an improvement of an existing entity, should have that idea patented. You are, after all, competing with hundreds of thousands of likeminded individuals who just may invent the same thing you have.

    Since 1963, the United States Patent and Trademark Office has granted more than 2.5 million utility (technology) patents in the U.S., which are issued for "the invention of a new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or a new and useful improvement thereof." An issued patent generally prohibits others from making, using, or selling the invention for a period of up to twenty years from the date of patent application filing. Although granted patents are deemed useful, most of the ones we encountered through Google Patent Search don't seem that useful at all, including a sensor that detects whether you've hit a pedestrian and a clock that tells time in dog years. Here are ten of the strangest tech patents to ever have been issued.
    Patents 1 - 5
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    Invention: Conductivity sensing device for diapers
    Patent number: 4205672
    Filing date: Nov 28, 1977
    Issue date: Jun 3, 1980
    Inventor: Karel Dvorak
    Instead of relying on your sense of smell to indicate whether your baby's diapers need changing, this invention consists of a device that senses dampness in a diaper for you. The diaper will have a plastic waterproof outer layer and an inner layer of urine-absorbent material, while the sensing device will comprise of a pair of electric "connected jaw members" that clamp on the edge of a disposable diaper and detect a change of conductivity within the diapers.
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    Invention: Automatic bed maker
    Patent number: 4441222
    Filing date: Jul 30, 1981
    Issue date: Apr 10, 1984
    Inventor: Peter J. Tascarella
    Most people can't be bothered with making their bed everyday. But if Peter Tascarella has anything to do with it, the dreaded process will be done automatically. His electronically operated bed cover is secured to the frame of a bed with rods, and mechanical arms and rollers are used to make a bed and smooth bed cover wrinkles automatically...
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    :dunno:See article for the rest of the goofy stuff...