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Old 03-21-2015, 01:31   #1
btefft
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Heavier recoil spring for G27

Does anyone know who makes a heavier recoil spring than the G27's stock spring?

I ask because I replaced the recoil spring in my little Ruger LCP with a heavier one (13-lb) and it is a pleasure to shoot, now. It really tamed that little rascal. So, I'm wondering if it'd work on my G27.

Thanks
Bobby
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Old 03-21-2015, 06:49   #2
Dave.1
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You can get a non captive spring set from Wolff with different weights.
http://www.gunsprings.com/index.cfm?...ID=1&mID=5#121

I've been using this one on my G26 since 2008 (with spring changes). Coating shows wear but functions fine.
Gunsmithing

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Check out Lone Wolf too. They now have a stainless version.
http://www.lonewolfdist.com/Detail.a...D=7413&CAT=210

Dave
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Old 03-21-2015, 09:00   #3
btefft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave.1 View Post
You can get a non captive spring set from Wolff with different weights.
http://www.gunsprings.com/index.cfm?...ID=1&mID=5#121

I've been using this one on my G26 since 2008 (with spring changes). Coating shows wear but functions fine.
Gunsmithing

Gunsmithing

Check out Lone Wolf too. They now have a stainless version.
http://www.lonewolfdist.com/Detail.a...D=7413&CAT=210

Dave
Thanks for the reply and pics, Dave.

I emailed Lone Wolf with questions about their spring. Do you happen to know the weight of the stock spring and about how many more pounds a new spring needs to be to do the job of reducing recoil. I wouldn't want to get a spring with the same weight as the factory one.

Bobby
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Old 03-21-2015, 09:23   #4
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This is per the Wolff gunsprings.com.

"Reduced Power...: 14 Lb.
Factory Standard.: 16 Lb.
Extra Power.........: 18, 20, 22 & 24 Lb"

They are the same for G26, G27, and G33. You'd think the heavier calibers would be stiffer but even Glock OEM uses the same weight.

I don't know that much about the Lone Wolf, but I assume they are either using the Wolff or some other mfg springs. I like the Lone Wolff as far as being a captured spring, but I'm used to using a non captured after all these years.

The springs aren't that expensive once you have the guide rod set up so you might want to experiment with what will reduce recoil but not impair the function of the pistol.

Dave
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Old 03-21-2015, 09:47   #5
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Felt recoil is a funny thing but, in general, going up in spring weight causes more felt recoil not less.

There are aftermarket suppliers that sell multi-spring recoil assemblies that purport to reduce felt recoil (i.e. Springco, etc.) and there may be some truth to their claims as Glock wouldn't be spending the money to include dual spring RSA's in their later guns for nothing.

On the other hand, if it makes it feel less to you, that is all that counts.
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Old 03-21-2015, 10:53   #6
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Lightning strike usta make a dual coil captured g27 spring,I have them in 5 of my g27s.I have one in my EDC g23,not a dual coil but titanium none the less.I don't know if they still do.I couldn't post a link at gunpoint.'08.
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Old 03-21-2015, 16:40   #7
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That's the rule of thumb to those that know, but "felt recoil" is subjective to begin with. Recoil is ultimately reduced by good technique, repetition, and training. Nobody want's to swallow that.

Placebo effect plays a greater role. If you spend money outside the ring of "factory brand" you perceive better results- whatever those results may be.

This is rampant in the automotive industry with promises of a "5% increase in horsepower", "better, smoother, running engine" etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WeeWilly View Post
Felt recoil is a funny thing but, in general, going up in spring weight causes more felt recoil not less.

There are aftermarket suppliers that sell multi-spring recoil assemblies that purport to reduce felt recoil (i.e. Springco, etc.) and there may be some truth to their claims as Glock wouldn't be spending the money to include dual spring RSA's in their later guns for nothing.

On the other hand, if it makes it feel less to you, that is all that counts.

Last edited by cciman; 03-21-2015 at 16:40..
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Old 03-21-2015, 17:03   #8
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That's the rule of thumb to those that know, but "felt recoil" is subjective to begin with. Recoil is ultimately reduced by good technique, repetition, and training. Nobody want's to swallow that.

Placebo effect plays a greater role. If you spend money outside the ring of "factory brand" you perceive better results- whatever those results may be.

This is rampant in the automotive industry with promises of a "5% increase in horsepower", "better, smoother, running engine" etc...
I don't disagree with these notions. Felt recoil can change with how much flash a given load develops as well. Two loads with the exact same bullet and powder charge weight, going the exact same speed at the muzzle, shot from the exact same gun can give the shooter a perception the big flash load is much hotter, hence more felt recoil.

In my experience, the more you shoot, the less recoil comes into the forefront of your consciousness. On the other hand, I always shoot low recoiling loads better than their hotter counterparts, at least after the first shot.
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Old 03-21-2015, 19:40   #9
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Lots of stuff to think about. Placebo effect, hadn't thought about that, but I swear the heavier spring in the LCP caused less pain in the web of my right hand - seemed real to me.

And I also am wondering if the metal rod may be better, in the long run, that the OEM one.

Bobby.
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Old 03-21-2015, 19:49   #10
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Lots of stuff to think about. Placebo effect, hadn't thought about that, but I swear the heavier spring in the LCP caused less pain in the web of my right hand - seemed real to me.

And I also am wondering if the metal rod may be better, in the long run, that the OEM one.

Bobby.
I wouldn't over think it, if it works for you that is all that matters.

Changing spring rates will affect the recoil impulse, how soon the barrel unlocks (at the margins), etc. and how it feels in your hand, where the pressure points appear, etc. In addition, like ski boots, sometimes you get used to how they feel over time. It really is a three dimension chess problem.

My wife is really into the whole homeopathic, organic, new age stuff. I always tell her, "The Placebo Effect is real for the person experiencing it, who cares if it only works for you?"
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Old 03-21-2015, 22:00   #11
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Placebo affect can change perception of reality but not the reality itself. It has it's benefits if used in the right direction, but also limits. "If it works for you, it's all that matters"- is very organic, but on a large scale, can be economically foolish. That's how companies that rely on placebo in their products make good profit. That is also why it is so important to have oversight by entities that can be as objective as possible to evaluate the effect.

People may feel better after inhaling all natural, burning brown plant leaves, but it does not change the reality that it is still a toxin, and long term, causes cancer, or lung disease.

That loud muffler may make your car seem to have more power, but on the dyno it has less.

Just 2 extreme examples of where placebo effect is not necessarily good. A $10 recoil spring, + a $20 guide rod, probably not that immense in one case. This is a free country based on free market principles.
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Old 03-21-2015, 22:01   #12
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Next topic:

Muzzle Brakes, flash hiders, and compensators
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Old 03-22-2015, 00:15   #13
btefft
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Next topic:

Muzzle Brakes, flash hiders, and compensators
Ha, I get your point cciman
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Old 03-22-2015, 06:37   #14
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And I also am wondering if the metal rod may be better, in the long run, that the OEM one.

Bobby.
I don't think the metal is any better than the OEM. I got into using it mainly for economy. When I got my Wolff set up they were only about $12 and the springs buy them selves are cheaper than the OEM double spring unit.

Dave
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:33   #15
btefft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave.1 View Post
You can get a non captive spring set from Wolff with different weights.
http://www.gunsprings.com/index.cfm?...ID=1&mID=5#121

I've been using this one on my G26 since 2008 (with spring changes). Coating shows wear but functions fine.
Gunsmithing

Gunsmithing

Check out Lone Wolf too. They now have a stainless version.
http://www.lonewolfdist.com/Detail.a...D=7413&CAT=210

Dave
Hey Dave, I was wondering: as you do your spring changes, do you notice any difference in recoil, if not, why do spring changes?
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:51   #16
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Originally Posted by btefft View Post
Hey Dave, I was wondering: as you do your spring changes, do you notice any difference in recoil, if not, why do spring changes?
I honestly can't say that I notice a difference when I change, as far as felt recoil goes.

I change on my G26 every year, mostly because I put at least 3K rounds thru it. It's also a carry pistol and I want it in top shape. With the Wolff springs I bought last year it costs me about $7, the Glock OEM recoil spring assembly is about $18.

One thing to consider is that you are battering the frame pretty well every time you fire a round. I doubt that you will ever wear the frame out with abuse, and the pistol may continue to function well enough with a worn spring but having it fail to go back into battery one time can be a problem if you use it for self defense.

I don't know what you'll choose to do as far as spring strength goes, but I think even the OEM Glock spring should be changed every 5K or so.

Let us know what you end up doing. I'd be interested to hear what Lone Wolf has to say.

Dave
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Old 03-22-2015, 10:04   #17
btefft
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I honestly can't say that I notice a difference when I change, as far as felt recoil goes.

I change on my G26 every year, mostly because I put at least 3K rounds thru it. It's also a carry pistol and I want it in top shape. With the Wolff springs I bought last year it costs me about $7, the Glock OEM recoil spring assembly is about $18.

One thing to consider is that you are battering the frame pretty well every time you fire a round. I doubt that you will ever wear the frame out with abuse, and the pistol may continue to function well enough with a worn spring but having it fail to go back into battery one time can be a problem if you use it for self defense.

I don't know what you'll choose to do as far as spring strength goes, but I think even the OEM Glock spring should be changed every 5K or so.

Let us know what you end up doing. I'd be interested to hear what Lone Wolf has to say.

Dave
I'll let you know what LW tells me. It just dawned on me that the stronger spring is probably used more for improving cycling (going into battery), then for reducing recoil.

No way I'll every shoot as many rounds as you do, though.

Last edited by btefft; 03-22-2015 at 10:05..
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