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Old 02-24-2014, 11:43   #1
BCGUNCOLL
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Reloading .243 winchester

im not new to reloading, but im new to reloading this caliber. ive read that different brass causes higher pressures in this caliber. the reloading manual states that winchester brass was the only brass that didnt cause higher pressure. ive got many different makes of brass for this caliber. i was just wondering if anyone has any experience with this problem. any thoughts or advice will be much appreciated.
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Old 02-24-2014, 12:44   #2
Colorado4Wheel
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Or you could say,

Every other brass caused normal pressure and Winchester is the only brass that cause lower pressure.

Just saying, you could see the glass half full or half empty.
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Old 02-24-2014, 14:00   #3
fredj338
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All brass is not the same. Diff manuf can have diff internal volume. So work a load up to max in one, it may be over pressure in another. Also some brass is softer than others in the critical head area, showing pressure signs early with loose primer pockets. I find this to be true of Federal brass in several calibers.
So the answer to you, it depends on the brass & the chamber & your loads. If you work a load up to max in one manuf brass, then it's best to reduce the load 5% & work it back up. if you never go to max, switching brass brands doesn't matter as much.
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the reloading manual states that winchester brass was the only brass that didnt cause higher pressure.
What manual was that? I find that statement about any brand of brass not showing pressure signs suspect, if not complete BS.
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"Given adequate penetration, a larger diameter bullet will have an edge in wounding effectiveness. It will damage a blood vessel the smaller projectile barely misses. The larger permanent cavity may lead to faster blood loss. Although such an edge clearly exists, its significance cannot be quantified".

Last edited by fredj338; 02-24-2014 at 14:02..
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Old 02-24-2014, 14:30   #4
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it was printed in the 14th edition speer manual, i do believe.
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Old 02-24-2014, 15:26   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCGUNCOLL View Post
it was printed in the 14th edition speer manual, i do believe.
Well I have that, so I'll check, but that can be misunderstood. ALL brass can show high pressure signs.
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"Given adequate penetration, a larger diameter bullet will have an edge in wounding effectiveness. It will damage a blood vessel the smaller projectile barely misses. The larger permanent cavity may lead to faster blood loss. Although such an edge clearly exists, its significance cannot be quantified".
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Old 02-24-2014, 16:45   #6
dbarry
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I've reloaded 243 for many years, no issues with various brass manufacturers. Internal dimensions can be different so pressure will vary. Start out with recommended starting loads and work your way up.

55 grain nosler will have you over 4000 fps with the 243. That is moving along pretty quick.
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Old 02-24-2014, 19:24   #7
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I have loaded a lot of 243 these past few years and burned out a few barrels.

I like Lapua and Winchester brass. The Lapua brass is better quality, but more expensive. And it lasts longer.

Pick a nice slow powder and have at it.
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Old 02-24-2014, 21:23   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCGUNCOLL View Post
it was printed in the 14th edition speer manual, i do believe.
Ok, read it, you misunderstood the statement:
"we used Winchester cases. Do not substitute cases of other makes with these loads or excessive pressure can result".
A standard warning when reloading, especially for loads at the top end. Again, if you work up a load & it is pushing max for that brand of brass, regardless of that brand, & you subsitute another brand later, you need to drop 5% & rework that load.
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"Given adequate penetration, a larger diameter bullet will have an edge in wounding effectiveness. It will damage a blood vessel the smaller projectile barely misses. The larger permanent cavity may lead to faster blood loss. Although such an edge clearly exists, its significance cannot be quantified".

Last edited by fredj338; 02-24-2014 at 21:23..
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Old 02-25-2014, 11:10   #9
BCGUNCOLL
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Ok. gotcha. thanx for all the insight, everyone. im just new to the caliber all the way around, so i wanted to check with some more veteran reloaders. thanx again all.
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