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Old 11-01-2013, 21:43   #1
jp3975
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Hot bluing...

So ive been wanting to learn to do this and i found a thread on it that seems like a good method.

Any advice? Anyone know where to get the mentioned chemicals or a substitute? An online source would be great.

http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB3/vie...p?f=12&t=13109
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Old 11-01-2013, 21:47   #2
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Also...im not looking to spend a fortune, so id rather not have to pay $60 plus to brownells. I can have it done locally for $75, so id rather just make my own stuff with the ingredients listed in the thread.
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Old 11-02-2013, 18:17   #3
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Im surprised. Looks like I finally found something about guns, no one knows about on here.
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Old 11-02-2013, 19:27   #4
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Old 11-02-2013, 20:31   #5
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I am not sure why the hostility towards Brownell. They are good people. They will help you. They will want you to succeed.

FWIW, the bluing is the easy part it is the metal prep that will determine the quality of the finished product.
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Old 11-03-2013, 08:37   #6
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"Fertilizer bluing" is a well known process.
As said, the metal prep is the secret, it must be of the texture you want and must be completely degreased.
When you go to dunk it in solution, bear in mind that you are working with boiling caustic, which will attack flesh faster than acid. Wear protective gear.
Also the Dunlap formula releases a lot of ammonia. Work outside.
You can get similar results without the fumes by substituting sodium nitrate.

Note that all the sodium hydroxide does is to raise the boiling point of the solution to where the nitrate will oxidize the surface of the steel, it does not play a part in the chemistry of the bluing.

Full description at
http://www.blindhogg.com/homemadesalts.html

I cannot find Ken M.'s description of how he does it, but the approach is similar except he puts up with the ammonia. Says it quits after a while when the solution is well mixed and reacted.
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Old 11-03-2013, 08:55   #7
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Interesting




Good info too, thanks!

Also, I know from experience that with any refinishing job, the secret to success is often the prep work.
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Old 11-05-2013, 17:45   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyoming View Post
I am not sure why the hostility towards Brownell. They are good people. They will help you. They will want you to succeed.

FWIW, the bluing is the easy part it is the metal prep that will determine the quality of the finished product.
No hostility. I just want to get started on the cheap. They want $60 for one ingredient but I could pay for someone to do it for $75.

I just found out my friend has a bead blaster so Im going to do that, and then sand it as best as i can.

I'll probably try cold bluing first and see how that goes. If I dont like the results after multiple coats then I'll try hot bluing.

Last edited by jp3975; 11-05-2013 at 17:54..
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Old 11-05-2013, 17:48   #9
jp3975
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
"Fertilizer bluing" is a well known process.
As said, the metal prep is the secret, it must be of the texture you want and must be completely degreased.
When you go to dunk it in solution, bear in mind that you are working with boiling caustic, which will attack flesh faster than acid. Wear protective gear.
Also the Dunlap formula releases a lot of ammonia. Work outside.
You can get similar results without the fumes by substituting sodium nitrate.

Note that all the sodium hydroxide does is to raise the boiling point of the solution to where the nitrate will oxidize the surface of the steel, it does not play a part in the chemistry of the bluing.

Full description at
http://www.blindhogg.com/homemadesalts.html

I cannot find Ken M.'s description of how he does it, but the approach is similar except he puts up with the ammonia. Says it quits after a while when the solution is well mixed and reacted.
Very helpful. Thanks.
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