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Old 10-22-2014, 19:51   #1
05shadow
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Electric heat

Hey guys
My wife and I are in the process of buying our first place(condo or town home). We looked at one that has electric heat and my neighbor told me that electric heat is really expensive and that my bill will be close to 300 bucks a month during winter.

How many of you guys have electric heat? Is it that expensive during the winter?
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Old 10-22-2014, 20:00   #2
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Depends on your location and the size of your place (as well as how well your place is insulated). My sister has had bills that high in this area, but my highest bill (smaller house) has been about $180 or $190 I think.
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Old 10-22-2014, 20:03   #3
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Do you live in Michigan or Florida? You need to provide more info. on where you live and what is common for your area.
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Old 10-22-2014, 20:03   #4
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That's for a stand alone home though.
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Old 10-22-2014, 20:17   #5
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I live in the burbs of Chicago. Cold winters here. The place we looked at was 1400 square feet. Two bedroom condo on 2nd floor. 8 units in a building
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Old 10-22-2014, 22:52   #6
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Depends on the cost per therm or KWH.... Also depends on type of electrical heating appliances.
We have an all electric home with a heat pump. I've had every heat known to man and I'll continue to stay with all electric. We aren't too far from Grand Coolie so our KWH cost is lower than say Southern California or Possibly Chicago.

My Daughter in Eastern Pa says their electric heating cost are pretty high.
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Old 10-22-2014, 22:57   #7
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I live in the burbs of Chicago. Cold winters here. The place we looked at was 1400 square feet. Two bedroom condo on 2nd floor. 8 units in a building
How many square feet of glass do you have? What kind of Glass
Low E. or plain old Double pane? Do you have a humidifier you can use in the winter time to help take the chill off a room or the Condo.
How high are the ceilings? If over 8 feet you should have some fans or such to break up heat stratification. Plus heavy draw curtains for all the large windows will cut a lot of heat loss.

Ask the neighbors how they are handling their heating cost.
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Old Yesterday, 00:17   #8
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Ask the realtor for a copy of last years electrical bills. You'll then get an idea of the cost to heat the place.

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Old Yesterday, 04:02   #9
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Electric heat pump or resistance heating? I lived in an apartment with electric resistance heating (electric baseboards) and oh my, was it expensive.
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Old Yesterday, 05:40   #10
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Electric heat pump or resistance heating? I lived in an apartment with electric resistance heating (electric baseboards) and oh my, was it expensive.
True. The reason my electric is so expensive in winter is because of the resistance heating when the heat pump can't keep up.
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Old Yesterday, 05:41   #11
Rick O'Shay
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Here in the deep South, electric (especially on a Co-op) is the cheaper way to go. Electric heat pumps are money savers. Chicago, not so much. You'd probably be cold a great deal of the time.
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Old Yesterday, 05:50   #12
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Electric heat

Depends on where you live and hoe severe the winters are.

Electric heat is the cheapest equipment to buy but the most expensive to operate. It is the least efficient way to heat your home.

If it's 10 yrs old or even real close to it, plan to switch it out to a heat pump if you have mildish winters. You'll save on heating costs and cooling costs with a more efficient AC. The quality of heat will be better as well.


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Old Yesterday, 05:55   #13
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Originally Posted by kiole View Post
Ask the realtor for a copy of last years electrical bills. You'll then get an idea of the cost to heat the place.
This......proof is in the pudding!
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Old Yesterday, 06:05   #14
Adamz04
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Northern indiana
2000sq ft ranch
Electric baseboard heat
Home is 100% electric
Before I got on a budget my electric bill was about 100 in the summer time and 400 in the winter.
So yes it is expensive.
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Old Yesterday, 06:35   #15
Dave514
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I spent a LOT of money putting in two geothermal systems, which are electric (one upstairs, one down) and heat 3200 square feet plus mild conditioning of 2800 square feet of basement on rural electric(more expensive than the town utilitiy company) in KY. My whole house is electric minus an occasionally used gas insert fireplace. The bill ranges from $130 to $300(peak winter). So electric can be economical but, as people have stated, your location, your unit, your electric company rates, home size and especially the build of your home matter. We built a home with 6 inch walls in an area that doesn't build them that way very often. That helps as well.

In contrast, I grew up in a home 10 minutes away that was 2000 square feet and had electric baseboard heaters and it was entirely too expensive to run them so it was Kerosene heaters until a heat pump was put in.

Get those past electric bills and find out what they old residents heated with. Then you will be better equipped to make a decision.
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Old Yesterday, 06:44   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave514 View Post
I spent a LOT of money putting in two geothermal systems, which are electric (one upstairs, one down) and heat 3200 square feet plus mild conditioning of 2800 square feet of basement on rural electric(more expensive than the town utilitiy company) in KY. My whole house is electric minus an occasionally used gas insert fireplace. The bill ranges from $130 to $300(peak winter). So electric can be economical but, as people have stated, your location, your unit, your electric company rates, home size and especially the build of your home matter. We built a home with 6 inch walls in an area that doesn't build them that way very often. That helps as well.

In contrast, I grew up in a home 10 minutes away that was 2000 square feet and had electric baseboard heaters and it was entirely too expensive to run them so it was Kerosene heaters until a heat pump was put in.

Get those past electric bills and find out what they old residents heated with. Then you will be better equipped to make a decision.

Geothermal is a heat pump, not electric


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Old Yesterday, 06:44   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick O'Shay View Post
Here in the deep South, electric (especially on a Co-op) is the cheaper way to go. Electric heat pumps are money savers. Chicago, not so much. You'd probably be cold a great deal of the time.
Also depends on if the heat pump was properly sized, they are usually oversized for heating in locations that have really cold winters.
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Old Yesterday, 06:47   #18
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Geothermal is a heat pump, not electric


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Geothermal is ground loop or ground source (well, lakes, ponds), Heat pump is the action of reversing the refrigerant flow to produce heat through the evaporator coil. This can be achieved with an outdoor air cooled condenser, water cooled condenser (non-geothermal, no lines ran underground or in water sources), or as you stated using the earth's constant temperatures to heat or cool the heat pump system.
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Old Yesterday, 06:54   #19
SCHADENFREUDE
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I live in NY and have electric heat. My bill runs around $177 per month. It has went up because a family member moved in. With a little more conservation it would be lower. Before the electric heat my bill was around $90.00 per month. When I had natural gas I was paying upwards of $500-$700 per month in the winter. So the electric heat has been much cheaper for me. It heats just as well as nat gas as far as i am concerned. And fixing the baseboard heaters is a lot cheaper than replacing a furnace.

PS

The house is slightly over a 1100 SQ feet with a full basement that isn't heated.

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Old Yesterday, 06:58   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 686Owner View Post
True. The reason my electric is so expensive in winter is because of the resistance heating when the heat pump can't keep up.
Put a high efficiency gas furnace in and have it set to take over after the heat pumps set point(not as low as it can run, just as low as it can run efficiently) You will get the best of both worlds.
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