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Old Yesterday, 09:15   #1
Maxthemutt
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School me on archery.

I was at Cabelas yesterday and shot a compound bow for the first time. I liked it now I have some questions.

Where's the Glocktalk of Archery?

I've never hunted but would consider it with a bow. For now it would be mostly target shooting at local ranges. I'd like the Glock of bows in other words great price per performance/reliability. What would you recommend?

What accessories are needed?

What do you gain by spending more vs less?


Thanks, Max
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Old Yesterday, 09:24   #2
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I'm no expert on the subject, but, I do 'fling an arrow, or two', on occasion.


First, you should get measured for draw length.
Also, look at different draw weights.

Depending on your age/size/build, you may want to consider a bow that can have the draw length and pull easily changed.

For example, I bought a Mission "Craze" for my youngest son, when he got 'bit' by the sport.
It's a great little bow that's easily adjusted/changed without using a bow press.


I gave up archery when I screwed up my back, in '91. I had a fantastic bow. Darton "SL-50". Not knowing any better, I sold it and a couple dozen arrows, along with a custom-made leather quiver. (Never should have sold that bow.)

Now, I have a Mission "Venture". I don't hunt with bow/arrow.

I just fling a few arrows in the back yard, from time-to-time.
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Old Yesterday, 09:49   #3
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As mentioned, draw length is key. Cabelas has a more than competent bow shop and can get you measured and up and shooting as good as anyone.

I recommend getting a ready to shoot rig...it will have a rest, sight, etc. As a novice shooter a standard set up (whisker biscuit and 3 pin sight) will be great and as you progress you can experiment and make changes. Fwiw I have been shooting for a long time and I use a whisker biscuit and a 3 pin sight...

Your arrow length will coordinate with your draw length, I shoot 1/4 over mine, and the arrow you use will depend on the draw lb of our bow. There is a chart on the arrow box that tells you what range...like 55 to 65lb draw use "xyz" arrow. The Cabala guy will set you up. I shoot Carbon Express arrows and whatever the Cabelas house brand of carbon arrows are...can't tell the difference. They will trim the arrows to your length and glue in the threaded inserts for free...let them. I shoot 100gr field tips to practice and 100gr broad heads to hunt...that way my bow shoots the same.

You can get a block target for $30ish...my son and I have shot 1000+ arrows into ours and it is still going strong.

I shoot a PSE Sinister and my son (14 but 5"9' 150lbs) shoots a diamond infinite edge (by Bowtech)...if your draw length allows you to shoot the diamond bow I highly recommend it. I paid $250 ($350 with a $100 gift card rebate) for his ready to shoot package and it is a nice bow for the $. Cranked up it will shoot almost 300fps and can be adjusted for a kid to shoot all the way up to a man. I draw at 29.5 in and that is too long for that bow, and the PSE Sinister is a very short hunting bow (28 in total height) it is also fast and a simple shooter. I love my PSE and would recommend that brand to anyone...mine was $599 ready to shoot and you need to add $100 for arrows, tips, and a release. I use a Tru Ball release...some shooters are VERY picky about their release...I am not, the $30 Tru Ball works great. I have shot $150 releases and noticed no difference.

Fun hobby...check your local laws regarding practicing. Around here I cannot legally shoot in the city limits, my property or not. Same rules as shooting a rifle although rarely followed. Don't think you can stroll out to a public park and set up. There are all kinds of archery clubs here, many that allow access to a range for a small annual fee. My son and I go to several.

For my son it is a competition...he loves to get inside my best shot (and I love it for him to do so)...for me it is a Zen exercise in breathing and control. He is bouncing around after a session from the excitement and I am in a calm serene mood...but we both love it. Hope you do too. I have yet to meet a fellow archer on the range that hasn't been pleasant, and one with more experience that wasn't willing to help and share their knowledge.

To answer the $ question. You pay for speed and consistency. If you shoot a single cam bow (highly recommend for a new shooter) you can get 320fps with a good sight and a standard arrow rest for $500 +\- that will be great for years. My $600 PSE shoots as good as a $1200 Hoyt or Matthews for someone with my level of experience (3-4 years casual shooter). Be realistic about your expectations. I shoot 4-6 in groups at 30 yards on my best day, 1 ft on my worst. I'm 44...that isn't going to change (most days I can't see them until I walk closer to the target anyway). My son is 14... If he committed to it he could potentially outshoot his bow and need to move to the next level of precision and quality.

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Old Yesterday, 10:48   #4
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Archerytalk.com is the glocktalk of archery. All the modern bows are pretty good, it comes down to what system/cams you like. Hoyt, Matthews, Bowtech, Elite, Bear are all good bows. Check out the Cabelas house brand. I know the Bass Pro "brand" is made by Diamond, which is made by Bowtech. Mission is a lower priced Matthews brand. Find an archery pro shop in your area, I have heard getting a knowledgable archery person can be hit or miss in the big stores.

ETA: forgot about PSE. And it looks like the Cabelas bows are made by Bowtech. The PSE Stinger looks like a good entry level bow and is $400 for a RTS package, you just have to get arrows and a release with that.
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Old Yesterday, 12:53   #5
Reyn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutha73 View Post
Archerytalk.com is the glocktalk of archery. All the modern bows are pretty good, it comes down to what system/cams you like. Hoyt, Matthews, Bowtech, Elite, Bear are all good bows. Check out the Cabelas house brand. I know the Bass Pro "brand" is made by Diamond, which is made by Bowtech. Mission is a lower priced Matthews brand. Find an archery pro shop in your area, I have heard getting a knowledgable archery person can be hit or miss in the big stores.

ETA: forgot about PSE. And it looks like the Cabelas bows are made by Bowtech. The PSE Stinger looks like a good entry level bow and is $400 for a RTS package, you just have to get arrows and a release with that.
This, Archerytalk.com
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Old Yesterday, 12:56   #6
Naelbis
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Learn basic archery the same way you learn basic shooting...with a basic, no frills bow and target. Don't sink hundreds or thousands of dollars into modern sport bows until you are proficient with a basic longbow/recurve. Not only will it save you money but it will allow you to learn the skill the right way.
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Old Yesterday, 13:04   #7
ithaca_deerslayer
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Local archery shop.

Look them up. If you like the owner, his place, and his help, let him set you up.

Around me, archery shop owners are long time shooters with a lot of experience. Typically the shop is next to their house. They got a backyard range, maybe inside a barn. Has an oldest son helping out, and maybe some other local expert.

They measure you up, make suggestions, and after you buy will set it all up for you, watch you shoot and tune as needed.
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Old Yesterday, 13:34   #8
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I agree with Ithaca , find the best pro shop around you . We had a guy here that guys drove 7 hours from NYC to have him set up their bows, one guy flew in From Kansas to,have two,bows set up . Phil used a hooter shooter then had you shoot and kept adjusting till you were spot on. He had you come when the shop was closed so he could work one on one with you.

New shooters would leave his shop and out shoot guys like me with over 20 years of bow work! But then some of us were shooting bows that were 15 and 20 years old. That's what first sent me to Phil, seeing what these new guys could do!

I've watched new guys bring their bow to work and shoot against long time archers ,they used dollar bills as targets , hit them at 20 yards each time .

A new bow set up by a truely knowledgable guy and it's not that hard to shoot baseball size groups.

Good luck!
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Old Yesterday, 14:08   #9
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Originally Posted by ithaca_deerslayer View Post
Local archery shop.

Look them up. If you like the owner, his place, and his help, let him set you up.

Around me, archery shop owners are long time shooters with a lot of experience. Typically the shop is next to their house. They got a backyard range, maybe inside a barn. Has an oldest son helping out, and maybe some other local expert.

They measure you up, make suggestions, and after you buy will set it all up for you, watch you shoot and tune as needed.
This is the best archery advice in the world. It should be a sticky for the entire internet.

Also, shoot some different bows and styles of bows. Compounds are incredible machines but they are pretty heavy, complex and take some of the archery feel out of archery.
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Old Yesterday, 14:16   #10
Emmett4glock
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I agree with RonS. Great advice from Ithaca_Deerslayer. The guy that taught me several decades ago was trained by an Olympic archery coach. It's the best training I've ever received in archery.
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Old Yesterday, 19:15   #11
elkhart
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Check out traditional archery too. Long bows and recurves are awesome! Tradgang is the glocktalk of traditional archery. Whatever it is you choose, enjoy!
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Old Yesterday, 20:44   #12
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Find a local archery shop, buy from them. They will give you proper instruction. Don't listen to some good old boy on the web, or a clerk at Cabelas. You don't want to start off with bad habits.

My closest Archery store, Everything Archery, has a youth league, range, and a modest inventory. They may cost a little more ($20 per dozen arrows) but it pays off in the long run.

My youngest bows are PSE and Bowtech (oldest Bear and PSE). I've always loved PSE, but the Bowtech is unbelievably accurate.

And don't skimp on arrows. Carbon Express makes some extremely accurate arrows.


These are with Carbon Express arrows, from a Bowtech bow.

The Okie Corral

The Okie Corral


If you can't make it out, the second arrow went right down the tube of the first. The blue band at the nock was actually wrapped around shaft of the second arrow. It's just 35 yards, but I've never seen any of my other gear shoot that well. That was early in the spring, so I wanted to get a grouping before adjusting the sights to the bullseye. That's a pretty good group. I had to quit shooting multiple arrows at one bullseye because those arrows aren't cheap.

There is a sign at Everything Archery that says "It's not the equipment, it's the Archer", but I think they mean in to the negative. Good equipment certainly helps.
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Old Yesterday, 21:10   #13
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My son and I took up archery recently, he shoots mostly long-bow, primitive style bows, recurves, I shoot a Bowtech compound bow, Diamond Infinity, beginners' bow, soon to be a bow-fishing outfit.

I'm in the learning stage for the mechanics of it to take hold, for me, hard work and I don't get to do it often enough....that said, I am getting better, tweaking that bow for as much accuracy as I can get it to deliver.

Good luck have fun and be sure of your target.
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Old Yesterday, 21:48   #14
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Regardless of whether you learn to shoot traditional longbows/recurves or training wheel bows there are two words that will define your success as an archer...

Back-tension!

Nothing matters in archery if you don't have good back tension...NOTHING!


Archery is a sport that require good FORM and the FORM is universal among all styles of bows and all disciplines...hunting, olympic, 3d...doesn't matter. Proper FORM is universal much like it is in golf and baseball.

Find someone that teaches archery and STARTS wit back tension training and blind bale shooting at 2-3 yard WITHOUT targets. You need to work on building and training your back muscles and I promise, regardless of how fit your are, I could make more sore in a day of training with a 20 pound bow and focusing on your back muscles than you would be from a day of heavy weight training.

If you draw your bow using your arm muscles you are doing it wrong. The large muscles in your back should be doing this. NOT your biceps etc. If your release (finger or mechanical) isn't cued off your back tension you are doing it wrong.

Learn good FORM from a good instructor and you will not have to unlearn bad habits down the road. The money you pay for this instruction will save you time, frustration and money down the road...
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Old Yesterday, 22:22   #15
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I would suggest Bowsite.com as the best archery forum.
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Old Yesterday, 22:36   #16
vettely
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And get ready to spend some money $$
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Old Yesterday, 23:58   #17
Teecher45
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And get ready to spend some money $$
Up front, yes. Just like everything else. But an average afternoon shooting a bow is still a lot cheaper than an average afternoon shooting a gun.
My two oldest boys shoot on the school archery team and we have a lot of fun competing in the back yard. We've recently started small game hunting and its a lot of fun too.
Buy a well respected name and accessories, that way if for some reason you find you're just not that into it you can get most of your money back.
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Old Today, 00:17   #18
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Up front, yes. Just like everything else. But an average afternoon shooting a bow is still a lot cheaper than an average afternoon shooting a gun.
My two oldest boys shoot on the school archery team and we have a lot of fun competing in the back yard. We've recently started small game hunting and its a lot of fun too.
Buy a well respected name and accessories, that way if for some reason you find you're just not that into it you can get most of your money back.
Yep, up front. But it is well worth it.
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