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Old 06-28-2013, 18:15   #1
Chronos
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NSA spying and "supporting the party"

Apparently, if you're a Democrat or a Republican, your position on NSA spying is highly dependent on who is the President.

http://tv.msnbc.com/2013/06/10/suppo...hos-president/

Both Democrats and Republicans look bad in their own unique ways: Democrats seem to be most likely to change their opinion based on who is in power. Republicans, while also fickle, are just flat-out more likely to support the government spying on your personal life.

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Old 06-28-2013, 18:43   #2
Ruble Noon
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Hopefully there will come a day when the partisans realize that they are supporting the same team and that the team is working against them.
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Old 06-28-2013, 18:59   #3
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Here's a fact: You two are not surprised.
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Old 06-28-2013, 19:09   #4
CitizenOfDreams
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Notice that >50% of the population supports the NSA spying regardless of which party is in power. So the spying will continue for as long as we keep our current political system.
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Old 06-28-2013, 19:12   #5
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The Dems were anti war until Obama took office. The 'conservatives' didn't turn fiscally conservative until Bush left. Just a vicious cycle of stupidity due to a zombified mental state.
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Old 06-28-2013, 20:05   #6
barbedwiresmile
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(nevermind)
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Old 06-28-2013, 20:18   #7
snerd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruble Noon View Post
Hopefully there will come a day when the partisans realize that they are supporting the same team and that the team is working against them.
Why you America-hating, dirty hippie pot-smoking commie!! You'll pay for that.
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Old 06-28-2013, 20:37   #8
GAFinch
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While warrantless wiretapping was going on in 2006, there was at least the presumption that probable cause was being applied.
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Old 06-28-2013, 21:58   #9
Syclone0538
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Apparently, if you're a Democrat or a Republican, your position on NSA spying is highly dependent on who is the President.
...
Good thing I'm not.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GAFinch View Post
While warrantless wiretapping was going on in 2006, there was at least the presumption that probable cause was being applied.
By who, Republicans?

Last edited by Syclone0538; 06-28-2013 at 21:59..
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Old 06-28-2013, 22:28   #10
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I have less and less reason to trust the political system each day.
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Old 06-29-2013, 08:00   #11
SJ 40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GAFinch View Post
While warrantless wiretapping was going on in 2006, there was at least the presumption that probable cause was being applied.
Just as wrong then as now. SJ 40
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Old 06-29-2013, 08:42   #12
Ruble Noon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GAFinch View Post
While warrantless wiretapping was going on in 2006, there was at least the presumption that probable cause was being applied.
For secretive surveillance court, rare scrutiny in wake of NSA leaks



http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2...eillance-court


Quote:
The two-hour meeting on June 13 featuring Bates and two top spy agency officials — prompted by reports days earlier by The Washington Post and Britain’s Guardian newspaper about the vast reach of the programs — reflects a new and uncomfortable reality for the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and its previously obscure members. Within the past month, lawmakers have begun to ask who the court’s judges are, what they do, why they have almost never declined a government surveillance request and why their work is so secretive.
The public is getting a peek into the little-known workings of a powerful and mostly invisible government entity. And it is seeing a court whose secret rulings have in effect created a body of law separate from the one on the books — one that gives U.S. spy agencies the authority to collect bulk information about Americans’ medical care, firearms purchases, credit card usage and other interactions with business and commerce, according to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.).
“The government can get virtually anything,” said Wyden, who as a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee is allowed to read many of the court’s classified rulings. “Health, guns, credit cards — my reading is not what has been done, it’s what can be done.”
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