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Old 05-31-2013, 17:42   #1
mac66
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Annual Bug Out Bicycle Thread

Every spring I dig out the bicycle and start my annual goal of riding 20-30 miles at least 4-5 times a week. The idea is work off the winter pounds, get into shape and explore the area. I usually write a post on how I'm doing so here it is...

This year, I've decided that I needed goals. The first of course was to build up to 20-30 miles (basically 100 miles or more a week). That's preparation for my second goal.

The second goal was to ride 100 miles in day. Not all at once but ride 30-40 rest a couple hours, ride some more, rest etc. And of course I will need to build up to that by increasing my miles to 30, then 40, then 50 or more a day. That was preparation for my third goal.

The third goal is to do a simulated bug out by bicycle to my hunting property which is approx. 175 miles away. I thinking 2-2.5 days to get there

I've already reached the first goal in that I am doing about 120 miles a week for the last 2 weeks. I've ridden a couple 30+ days and one 40 mile day.

I have to say that I probably wasn't ready for the 40 miler. I hit the wall at around 32 miles. I was completely spent, tapped, wiped out. It only took me 2 hours to ride the first 30 miles. And it took me 2 more hours to ride the last 10 and that was after resting for an hour after 32 miles. I had enough hydration, body just wouldn't go. Had I had someone to call to come and get me I would have. As it turned out, my wife was out of town, my kids were working on the other side of town and the closest other family was an hour away. Lesson learned, too much, too fast.

I should mention that I am 58 years old, 6'3" and weigh 270 (old football lineman). I think I need to lose 50 lbs to be able to ride 100 miles.

Next phase, other than the physical part is to prepare what to take on my bug out. I'll address that later.
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Old 06-01-2013, 06:13   #2
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I ran my first Tough Mudder last September and before this never ran anything further than a few miles.

Since it was a competition of sorts, and I never did anything like this before, I prepped for a year.

In comparison I'm 5'7 and 190#'s and even though my BMI is well north of 33 I'm not fat. I lift but do a lot of lighter weights and reps.

I think you hit it on the head...too much too fast.

Are you doing any sort of other cardio, lift, stretch or yoga type of regiment on top of the riding. This sounds crazy, but for the mudder I found the yoga to be extremely helpful.

I'm curious if you are using a road bike, mountain bike, hybrid?
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:58   #3
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My goal is to ride the GAP+C&O this year. To do it, I need to be able to ride 50 miles multiple days in a row. Right now it will be a camping trip, but I may have to make it a CC trip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mac66 View Post
I have to say that I probably wasn't ready for the 40 miler. I hit the wall at around 32 miles. I was completely spent, tapped, wiped out. It only took me 2 hours to ride the first 30 miles. And it took me 2 more hours to ride the last 10 and that was after resting for an hour after 32 miles. I had enough hydration, body just wouldn't go. Had I had someone to call to come and get me I would have. As it turned out, my wife was out of town, my kids were working on the other side of town and the closest other family was an hour away. Lesson learned, too much, too fast.
You are right about the too fast, but probably not about the too much. If you slow down the first two hours and you don't have any major aches and pains the 40 miles should be easy for your.

How is your heart rate when you ride? What zone are you riding in?

Additionally, what are you doing for food? Did you eat anything along the way? You don't want to bonk.

I will also say that last year, I dieted while trying to build miles. This year I am doing much better building miles not dieting. I seem to be recovering much better.

The diet will start once I build the muscles.

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The third goal is to do a simulated bug out by bicycle to my hunting property which is approx. 175 miles away. I thinking 2-2.5 days to get there
I am guessing that you are riding light. The added weight should prove interesting. Adding 40+# to my ride last weekend made a shorter ride more difficult.

Good luck.
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Old 06-01-2013, 20:18   #4
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I ran my first Tough Mudder last September and before this never ran anything further than a few miles.

Since it was a competition of sorts, and I never did anything like this before, I prepped for a year.

In comparison I'm 5'7 and 190#'s and even though my BMI is well north of 33 I'm not fat. I lift but do a lot of lighter weights and reps.

I think you hit it on the head...too much too fast.

Are you doing any sort of other cardio, lift, stretch or yoga type of regiment on top of the riding. This sounds crazy, but for the mudder I found the yoga to be extremely helpful.

I'm curious if you are using a road bike, mountain bike, hybrid?
My regiment before I start riding in the spring is to do 30-40 minutes on the eliptical or stationary bike, then lift. Odd days I swam a couple thousand meters. When I start riding I usually just lift twice a week and swim once in a while to stay loose. Riding is 4-5 times a week.

I ride an older Specialized Expedition w/XL frame. It is kind of a commuter/hybrid bike. It is pretty comfortable to ride. It has racks on it but I put narrower tires on it. I know I would be much more efficient on a road bike, particularly since this one isn't geared very high, but I like the workout I get and I can throw some knobbies on it and go off road if I want. After riding one of my brother's hybrid road bikes, I am leaning toward more of one of those for my bug out.
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Old 06-01-2013, 20:42   #5
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Interesting thread. I want to get back on my mountain bike and build up my miles. I also want to build up my walking miles as well. Haven't been on the bike at all this year (surgery) but have recovered now to the point that I'm ready to get back into the saddle (no pun intended).

Don't know what I'd be capable of to start off again, but ready to start.
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Old 06-01-2013, 21:12   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mac66 View Post
...
The third goal is to do a simulated bug out by bicycle to my hunting property which is approx. 175 miles away. I thinking 2-2.5 days to get there

...

Next phase, other than the physical part is to prepare what to take on my bug out. I'll address that later.
Nashbar sells inexpensive panniers (bicycle saddlebags). I put lightweight hiking gear (tent, sleeping bag, air mattress, stove, etc.) and food/water on the bicycle rack and in the panniers when I go "bikepacking". I use a bungee cord net to hold things to the top of the rear rack. This set up adds over 20 lbs to my skinny-tire road bike.

To offset the increased weight, and because I have a compact double crank set (two sprockets where the pedals are instead of a triple), for $60 I added a mountain bike derailleur, new (longer) chain, and a new rear cassette to give me a nice "granny gear" on the steeper climbs. I am very happy with this arrangement, even though riding on dirt/gravel roads is a bit disconcerting on the skinny tires. YMMV.
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:15   #7
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Nashbar sells inexpensive panniers (bicycle saddlebags). I put lightweight hiking gear (tent, sleeping bag, air mattress, stove, etc.) and food/water on the bicycle rack and in the panniers when I go "bikepacking". I use a bungee cord net to hold things to the top of the rear rack. This set up adds over 20 lbs to my skinny-tire road bike.

To offset the increased weight, and because I have a compact double crank set (two sprockets where the pedals are instead of a triple), for $60 I added a mountain bike derailleur, new (longer) chain, and a new rear cassette to give me a nice "granny gear" on the steeper climbs. I am very happy with this arrangement, even though riding on dirt/gravel roads is a bit disconcerting on the skinny tires. YMMV.
I was curious about this. I have a small saddle bag on my mountain bike. Enough for a small amount of stuff like flashlight, rain poncho, small first aid kit, fire-starter stuff etc as well as a pouch for the cell phone.

My son and I went 'bike packing' (I like that) this morning for a couple of hours. We had our day packs on our bags and it was fine, but a rack in the back of the bike to secure a pack on would be nice as well and safe the shoulders/neck some undo fatigue. I'll have to take a look.
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Old 06-02-2013, 12:46   #8
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OP, I hope you don't mind as I take your thread in a different direction.

I am sure many of you know www.bikeforums.net, but I wanted to recommend it for all things bicycle.

As far as bags go, the way I see it, there are a couple different ways to go. You can outfit your bike with bike-bags OR setup to use bags that are not bike bags.

For the bike bags,
I have a TransIt Epic DX Rack Trunk. http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...77_-1___000000 This is a great bag. My Nikon D7000 fits in it with the 28-300 lens. Map under the camera. GPS on top of the bag. The two sides are good for cell phones. If I didn't have a large DSLR, I could use this bag for summer day trips.

I also have some very large waterproof panniers. It looks like they don't make those any more. They are good for spring and fall trips when I needed food, jacket, spare tube..... These bags are well worn after just a couple years.

So I started looking for a new set with QR and some pockets. I bought Ibera Bicycle Quick Clip-on Pannier (Unit:single). http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002T7PSPE?psc=1 It is small. Too small for my spring stuff (bulky light jacket kills the space).

So then I bought an Ibera PakRak Quick-Release Panniers (Single one), 30 L Capacity.


This is still fairly small.

Between the two panniers I should be able to carry most everything I want, but I can not stop at the grocery store. For that I will need a different pannier.

But for a long camping trip which may turn into a hike, I like the idea of non-bicycle bags. So I bought a Bob trailer. So far so good.

Survival/Preparedness Forum

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Old 06-02-2013, 16:23   #9
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Another method of carrying gear on your bike is to use frame, under-the-seat, handle bar, and "fuel tank" bags in lieu of using traditional racks and panniers. Many folks doing the Great Divide mountain bike race from southern Canada to northern Mexico every year do this to reduce weight.

Here's an example of what I'm describing:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...uGrzfL1A#t=86s

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Old 06-02-2013, 18:17   #10
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Busy teaching a rifle class this weekend so no miles in the last two days. Thank you all for the links and the insight on packing stuff.

I have rack bag on the back of my bike big enough to carry essential (tools, rain gear, food, basic survival kit and first aid. I carry a Camel Back Blowfish pack with additional stuff in it if I go out over 20 miles or so. It also doubles as my Get Home Bag in my car if I am not riding. Just started looking at paniers and other bags as well.

My older brother, who is more into bikes than I am, has ridden several across the state rides every summer for the last 10 years or so recommends a hybrid road bike for my trip. I rode with him last summer and he consistently rode 4-5 miles and hour faster with a lot less effort than I did.

Right now my bike is good for my workout, gonna have to really look into whether go with what I already have or get something more efficient for the trip.
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Old 06-03-2013, 18:56   #11
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Quote:
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This year, I've decided that I needed goals.
Within a year of getting my road bike I completed the 100 mile HHH race in Wichita Falls. In order to accomplish this goal, in training I followed the 10% rule in which I added about 10% distance to my 'long ride' each weekend, and dialed it back or skipped a week every month or two if my body told me that's what I needed to do. Believe it or not, I wasn't even sore after that 100mi ride, which shocked me since it got over 100 deg F while I was out riding.

Local club rides made up the bulk of my weekday training rides (~25mi a couple of weeknights each week).

Weekend club rides and 'T-shirt' bike rallies/races (~$35-$50 per event) constituted my 'long rides'. The bike rallies were occasionally necessary (esp. at 60+miles) due to lack of offerings on the club rides, plus that was a neat way to meet certain milestones (e.g., metric century) and/or donate to a charity.

If I wanted to do far more than 100 miles in a day, I would probably join the local radonneur club. (I don't! )
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Old 06-03-2013, 19:29   #12
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If you decide to buy traditional racks and panniers, be sure to verify you have enough room to actually pedal the bike (e.g., heel clearance).

If you want to bring the kitchen sink, a long wheelbase touring bike with long chain stays (e.g., Surly LHT) would be great and offer plenty of heel clearance (but stop and go riding may get old quick with all of that weight). But if you go the opposite route like I did and try to make a light duty touring bike out of a short wheelbase road bike, you'll need to find a really long rear rack so your panniers can be shifted as far back as possible so your heels won't hit the panniers.

It's easy to pop a wheelie with cantilevered weight at the rear of the bike.

If you were looking for an excuse to buy a new bike, any excuse will do.
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:23   #13
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Quote:
The third goal is to do a simulated bug out by bicycle to my hunting property which is approx. 175 miles away. I thinking 2-2.5 days to get there
Will your wife be joining you on your bug out?
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:23   #14
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Will your wife be joining you on your bug out?
Interesting that you mentioned that. My wife belonged to a youth church group back in the 1960s that used to take a couple weeks ride all over the state from church to church in the summer to do concerts. They would often ride hundreds of miles over the course of a week. So I asked her if she wanted to revisit her youth. "Uh.....no" was the reply. She did 20 miles with me yesterday so she doesn't dislike riding she doesn't want to sleep on the ground.

The purpose of simulating a bike bug out is more of just having a goal to shoot for in terms of riding for distance. There is also an element of "can I do it?" and "what would it take if I had to?"
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:41   #15
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If you decide to buy traditional racks and panniers, be sure to verify you have enough room to actually pedal the bike (e.g., heel clearance).

If you want to bring the kitchen sink, a long wheelbase touring bike with long chain stays (e.g., Surly LHT) would be great and offer plenty of heel clearance (but stop and go riding may get old quick with all of that weight). But if you go the opposite route like I did and try to make a light duty touring bike out of a short wheelbase road bike, you'll need to find a really long rear rack so your panniers can be shifted as far back as possible so your heels won't hit the panniers.

It's easy to pop a wheelie with cantilevered weight at the rear of the bike.

If you were looking for an excuse to buy a new bike, any excuse will do.
Thank you for that. Heel clearance was not something I had considered and wheel base is another. My bike has a short wheel base.

I am thinking at this point of having a set of paniers, a rack bag on top, a couple small tool or utility bags on the front and a CamelBack Blowfish pack for water and incidentals which I often wear anyway when I ride.

Here's my beast of burden. The little front bag is where I carry my phone, wallet and .38 snubby

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Old 06-05-2013, 17:49   #16
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I am thinking at this point of having a set of paniers, a rack bag on top, a couple small tool or utility bags on the front and a CamelBack Blowfish pack for water and incidentals which I often wear anyway when I ride.
I think that set-up will work great if your biggest items (e.g., tent, sleeping bag, winter coat, foam sleeping pad roll, etc.) will fit in your panniers and/or in your top-of-the-rack bag.

My 1 man tent poles were just a bit longer than what would fit comfortably in my panniers, but the tent bag fits perfectly on top of my rear rack. For hiking, I purchased a really expensive down summer-rated sleeping bag that compresses into a near water bottle sized roll. Filling my panniers with other lightweight hiking gear and a day or two of food means I have about 20lbs in them combined yet my bike is very rear heavy, so you will need to be careful with weight and its distribution. (I don't have fastener holes on my fork, so I can't run a front rack; and fully loaded down I'm not too far from the 270lbs stated weight limit of my aluminum road bike).

I prefer to avoid riding all day with a water-filled backpack. I also have a large bike frame which allows room for two over-sized water bottles. I loved my handlebar mounted third water bottle cage but it broke last year. So, you can carry 100+oz of fluid without a backpack if you so desire.

I'm not a bike connoisseur, so I couldn't tell if you had front suspension shocks or not. If you have shocks, do they have a lock-out setting on them? (That could help explain the speed difference you mentioned earlier (i.e., energy being expended via the front end 'bobbing' when you push the pedals vigorously.)

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Old 06-05-2013, 20:38   #17
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I think that set-up will work great if your biggest items (e.g., tent, sleeping bag, winter coat, foam sleeping pad roll, etc.) will fit in your panniers and/or in your top-of-the-rack bag.

My 1 man tent poles were just a bit longer than what would fit comfortably in my panniers, but the tent bag fits perfectly on top of my rear rack. For hiking, I purchased a really expensive down summer-rated sleeping bag that compresses into a near water bottle sized roll. Filling my panniers with other lightweight hiking gear and a day or two of food means I have about 20lbs in them combined yet my bike is very rear heavy, so you will need to be careful with weight and its distribution. (I don't have fastener holes on my fork, so I can't run a front rack; and fully loaded down I'm not too far from the 270lbs stated weight limit of my aluminum road bike).

I prefer to avoid riding all day with a water-filled backpack. I also have a large bike frame which allows room for two over-sized water bottles. I loved my handlebar mounted third water bottle cage but it broke last year. So, you can carry 100+oz of fluid without a backpack if you so desire.

I'm not a bike connoisseur, so I couldn't tell if you had front suspension shocks or not. If you have shocks, do they have a lock-out setting on them? (That could help explain the speed difference you mentioned earlier (i.e., energy being expended via the front end 'bobbing' when you push the pedals vigorously.)
Yes, it does have front shocks, no I never thought to check if they can be locked out but I can see how that could make a difference. Gonna have to check that.

I did ride 24 miles this afternoon at a brisk pace.
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Old 06-05-2013, 23:02   #18
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Nice little steel frame bike.

Quote:
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Yes, it does have front shocks, no I never thought to check if they can be locked out but I can see how that could make a difference. Gonna have to check that.

I did ride 24 miles this afternoon at a brisk pace.
Most of the time, I ride locked out. It is easier to get the miles. But...when I get of ruff road....I get the shocks going.
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Old 06-06-2013, 16:34   #19
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Nice little steel frame bike.



Most of the time, I ride locked out. It is easier to get the miles. But...when I get of ruff road....I get the shocks going.
Yes, mine lock out.

Now I just have to figure a way to carry my bow on my bike when I bug out.
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Old 06-06-2013, 17:43   #20
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Vietcong

they didn't ride the bikes, they loaded them with HUNDREDS of pounds of supplies, ammo, etc and pushed them..... something to think about...thinking outside the box..... this is how they moved millions of tons of supplies down the Ho Chi Minh trail....
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