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Old 02-07-2013, 02:38   #1
lawman800
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Taking a big jump (for me) - thoughts?

I have some stores of food and water, mainly Mountain House and MRE's along with water stores consisting of buying extra jugs every trip to the market so slowly stock up. I'm not satisfied with what I have so far though, not by a mile...

So... been browsing The Ready Store and clicked on a few things and next thing you know, I am up to about 2G's worth of Saratoga Farms, MRE, hundreds of gallons of water containers, Big Berkey, and other items... figure I might as well make a big leap to buy up a ton of stuff right now. What are your thoughts on this?

Also, looking to buy a lot of bulk grains/legumes like beans, oats, and rice. The Ready Store recommends a mill. So now I will come out and admit total ignorance. I know about storing those things, but how do you exactly eat the bulk stored rice, beans, oats, and wheat? I figure you can cook the rice and beans like normal, but you have to grind the wheat to make flour and bake with it? How about the rolled oats? Make oatmeal? I really have no clue on these common bulk items as far as how you should use them.
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:34   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lawman800 View Post
I have some stores of food and water, mainly Mountain House and MRE's along with water stores consisting of buying extra jugs every trip to the market so slowly stock up. I'm not satisfied with what I have so far though, not by a mile...

The food is cool,the water is suspect.If your gonna buy large container bottled water,MAKE sure the jugs are seamless.Injection molded type.

So... been browsing The Ready Store and clicked on a few things and next thing you know, I am up to about 2G's worth of Saratoga Farms, MRE, hundreds of gallons of water containers, Big Berkey, and other items... figure I might as well make a big leap to buy up a ton of stuff right now. What are your thoughts on this?

Water storage/filtration.With back-ups for the EDU ones.

Also, looking to buy a lot of bulk grains/legumes like beans, oats, and rice. The Ready Store recommends a mill. So now I will come out and admit total ignorance. I know about storing those things, but how do you exactly eat the bulk stored rice,I figure you can cook the rice and beans like normal, but you have to grind the wheat to make flour and bake with it? How about the rolled oats? Make oatmeal? I really have no clue on these common bulk items as far as how you should use them.
The info is out on GT,I'll help ya if you want.'08.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:49   #3
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Originally Posted by lawman800 View Post
I have some stores of food and water, mainly Mountain House and MRE's along with water stores consisting of buying extra jugs every trip to the market so slowly stock up. I'm not satisfied with what I have so far though, not by a mile...

So... been browsing The Ready Store and clicked on a few things and next thing you know, I am up to about 2G's worth of Saratoga Farms, MRE, hundreds of gallons of water containers, Big Berkey, and other items... figure I might as well make a big leap to buy up a ton of stuff right now. What are your thoughts on this?

Also, looking to buy a lot of bulk grains/legumes like beans, oats, and rice. The Ready Store recommends a mill. So now I will come out and admit total ignorance. I know about storing those things, but how do you exactly eat the bulk stored rice, beans, oats, and wheat? I figure you can cook the rice and beans like normal, but you have to grind the wheat to make flour and bake with it? How about the rolled oats? Make oatmeal? I really have no clue on these common bulk items as far as how you should use them.
Read some of the recent threads here - most suggest storing what you eat and eat what you store. I'd also say look at the expiration dates of what you normally eat and how much you regularly eat. You can buy a 2 year supply of it and restock as you deplete it.

As to water there are storage bladders that fit in your bathtub and some sell vertical storage.
Check out Honeyville - a lot of good info and supplies.
http://honeyvillegrain.com/

Last edited by PaulMason; 02-07-2013 at 05:52..
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:32   #4
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I am going to guess you don't cook from scratch much now.

Rice.. well you cook and use it like rice. Cooking rice is pretty simple. 1 part rice/2parts water in a pot. Bring to boil, cover, set burner to simmer, timer to 20 minutes. About a billion things you can do from there.. but honestly, a little butter, salt and pepper works for me any time.

Oats are eaten as a cereal or used as an ingredient in everything from cookies to meatloaf.

Wheat can be used a jillion ways, from sprouted to ground for flour.

Corn can be popped, ground, etc.

It is really a lifestyle change when you move from whatever you are eating now to a rotation lifestyle.

Water.. the crux of the whole deal.. storage is one part, treatment is another, and most importantly, resupply.

Research and knowledge on these things is very easy to come by.. after all, humans have been eating for millions of years, but McDonalds has only been doing our cooking for 50...

BTW, I have said it before.. MH (and all pre packaged dehydrated foods) and MRE's are the MOST expensive way to put up food.

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Old 02-07-2013, 07:54   #5
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Let me recommend a couple basic books..

The amazing wheat book, LeArta Moulton

The all American bean book, Ted Waskey

I can't believe it's food storage, Crystal Godfrey

Cooking the one burner way, Gray and Tilton

Artisan bread in 5 minutes a day, Hertzberg and Francois

the sprouting book, Ann Wigmore

Food storage 101, Peggy Layton

Those are all books I have looked in/used in the last few days.. We have a whole wall of cookbooks, but those are some that got us started, or that we refer to pretty regular.

Oh, and buy a GOOD mill. I don't care what the sales page tells you, There are really only 3-4 mills that will last until the end of the world, and grind flour in one pass. CLGM, GrainMaker, Diamante are the ONLY ones I would recommend, and those are from direct use/observation of several of their products. Between family and friends, we know/interact with about 125 people who have not bought a loaf of slimy white slice in decades.

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Old 02-07-2013, 09:40   #6
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Thank you all. I am adding the Water Bob to my shopping cart. As for the water storage, it's going to be the stackable blue jugs and I'm getting quite a few of those and filling it with filtered water from my home filter. Got the water preserver as well.

As for the cooking part... yeah, not a big cooking type of guy. Usually eat what's easy, if I eat at all during my day. I appreciate the references for the books and the mill. Definitely will have to learn how to bake fresh breads. Saw that mentioned a few times in the various videos I have been watching on long term food storage.

Kiri, what's EDU? I figure with a few hundred gallons and the Big Berkey, I can last a bit, but yeah, I don't have a resupply or manufacturing plan for water... did I mention I live in L.A. where the river is a concrete canal with everything in it but water?
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Old 02-07-2013, 10:07   #7
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Search the threads for thermos cooking. Works well for whole or cracked wheat and for oats. You will need a mill if you want to bake breads. The Country Living Grain Mill is pricey but it's a tank. While searching for bread recipes I suggest trying a couple of non-leavened flat bread recipes. You may not always have access to yeast or some sort of culture/starter but flat bread in a cast iron skillet is pretty easy.

Personally, I think a mix of bulk foods (like wheat, rice, oats, corn, beans) along with traditional canned food, some long term dehydrated/freeze dried in #10 cans plus some short term MREs makes a lot of sense and gives you some flexibility and variety. You'll have to use/rotate the MREs and canned food. If you do go the bulk food in buckets route, get a few gamma lids. You don't need them for all buckets but may want one gamma lid for each type of bulk food stored.

ETA, if buying bulk goods, don't forget bulk sugar, salt, spices. I also recommend storing canned butter and ghee.
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Old 02-07-2013, 10:08   #8
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If you are in the basin.. water is a real problem, without an emergency. How far are you from the ocean? In a real SHTF, you are in about the worst place I could think of, but, sea water is water.. just need a way to make it drinkable.. solar stills are touted, but I have played with them several times and never been happy with output.

I am thinking a person could set up a portable RO system, using a 12v battery and 12v water pump from an RV.. I know the one in our little camper makes about 30psi, that is not enough to push a RO, but the one in our big camper does about 50psi.. would need a way to recharge batteries, or some other way to provide 12v.. but doable..
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Old 02-07-2013, 10:12   #9
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Factory #10 canned flour, from Augason, or LDS cannery, NOT something you can yourself from a bag, will have a minimum 10+ years shelf life if stored within correct temperatures. The factory canned dry powdered shortening, butter, milk will have the same. Most other grains factory canned will have 25+ years shelf life. I buy canned long term from here.. http://store.lds.org/webapp/wcs/stor...8_-1_N_image_0
anything I can't find there I get from Augasons, Sam's carrys Augasons cheaper than the main site.

You can get extra wheat and store it for 25+ and grind for flour when needed. Victorio makes a 50 dollar hand grinder that works well, for a manual version.

They're expensive, but a big berkey is a must, IMO.
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Old 02-07-2013, 18:00   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lawman800 View Post
...Saratoga Farms, MRE, hundreds of gallons of water containers, Big Berkey, and other items... figure I might as well make a big leap to buy up a ton of stuff right now. What are your thoughts on this?
I know Auguson Farms, but not Saratoga Farms; no help there.

HUGE fan of the berkey. We don't use one on a daily basis, but I gave one to family members for christmas a year ago and they do; and it makes a huge difference in their life. Their well water is fine for washing, bathing, etc, and was 'safe' to drink, but got a horrible brackish taste if you heated it for coffee or tea or such. Used to be they carried bottles of water home (from other people's houses, from our shop, etc) strictly for coffee & tea use. Since having the big berkey, no more carrying bottles around; plus the other (emergency-use) benefits of having one around.


Quote:
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...Also, looking to buy a lot of bulk grains/legumes like beans, oats, and rice. The Ready Store recommends a mill. So now I will come out and admit total ignorance. I know about storing those things, but how do you exactly eat the bulk stored rice, beans, oats, and wheat? I figure you can cook the rice and beans like normal, but you have to grind the wheat to make flour and bake with it? How about the rolled oats? Make oatmeal? I really have no clue on these common bulk items as far as how you should use them.
All answers above are good, and the thermos-cooking is a great one imo. I discovered it probably ten years ago and even in normal times it's a great way to eat a breakfast that's ridiculously cheap and stunningly healthy. Not just a breakfast-only thing, but that's all I regularly use it for. I have done rice, pasta, and probably some other things in a thermos, and it's handy as can be. Most things you would typically slow-cook for a couple hours or less (oatmeal, cream of wheat, rice, pasta, lentils, etc), can be cooked in a thermos.

Popcorn, we buy in the 50-lb bags from sams club. Ground into meal, it makes great cornbread. I've heard folks say they pop it and then grind it, but I've never tried that personally.

As for mills, it's a very good idea to have non-electric mill or two on hand for true emergency use (and we do), but the one we primarily use is the Wonder Mill. Used to be called the Whisper Mill. It looks like a cross between a rice cooker and a blender, and works great. At its coarsest setting, it makes good meal, and can be adjusted down to regular flour or even super-fin pastry flour. My wife didn't like it when I bought it (kind of like buying her a new blender or vacuum-cleaner I guess), but now she likes it, and it gets a lot of use.
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Old 02-07-2013, 18:10   #11
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Just a note to reiterate what kirgi stated:

Quote:
If your gonna buy large container bottled water,MAKE sure the jugs are seamless.Injection molded type.
Those cheap gallon water jugs you get from the grocery store will leak over time.
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Old 02-08-2013, 00:42   #12
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Yeah, got the Berkey. The only problem is where to get water to purify in a bad situation. Guess I can get some 55 gallon water drums and then hope to capture the rain next few months if it rains at all.
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Old 02-08-2013, 00:42   #13
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Learn to make sourdough starter for breads. Ridiculously easy.

If you have the ability remember, the Dutch Oven is your friend.
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:40   #14
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Yeah, got the Berkey. The only problem is where to get water to purify in a bad situation. Guess I can get some 55 gallon water drums and then hope to capture the rain next few months if it rains at all.
Don't know what part of the country you're in or what your annual average rainfall is, but more rain falls on our heads than most people realize; biggest issue on rain-water catchment & use isn't having enough, it's the storing of it. A single one-inch rainfall on a 2,000 square-foot roof will fill more than twenty of those 55-gallon drums.

In our area, we get 46-48 inches most years. What's stunning about it is that 48 inches of rain, falling on a 2,000 square-foot roof is right at sixty thousand gallons; or about 160 gallons per day average. Issue really is storing what's needed between rains.
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Old 02-08-2013, 20:54   #15
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Learn to make sourdough starter for breads. Ridiculously easy.

If you have the ability remember, the Dutch Oven is your friend.
Most college girls don't think fondly of the Dutch Oven.

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Don't know what part of the country you're in or what your annual average rainfall is, but more rain falls on our heads than most people realize; biggest issue on rain-water catchment & use isn't having enough, it's the storing of it. A single one-inch rainfall on a 2,000 square-foot roof will fill more than twenty of those 55-gallon drums.

In our area, we get 46-48 inches most years. What's stunning about it is that 48 inches of rain, falling on a 2,000 square-foot roof is right at sixty thousand gallons; or about 160 gallons per day average. Issue really is storing what's needed between rains.
Not sure of the average rainfall in L.A. but it probably is not what you think... but then again, we have been getting more than average rainfall lately.
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Old 02-08-2013, 21:44   #16
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As long as you're not a college girl you're good to go, Just don't let them fluff the covers.

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Old 02-09-2013, 09:41   #17
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...Not sure of the average rainfall in L.A. but it probably is not what you think... but then again, we have been getting more than average rainfall lately.
Had to look it up: http://www.weather.com/weather/wxcli...ly/graph/90089

Only about 15 inches per year; you're doomed. 'Course, that's still ~18000 gallons in our example.

Storage would be a huge issue, but that's still enough to provide over 50 gallons a day.

Obviously, every situation is different - you may have less usable roof space to collect from, or maybe in an apartment with no real way to do so; all kinds of different variables and/or problems.
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Old 02-09-2013, 10:30   #18
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Hi Lawman,

Ever think about a bugout location for the bad times? My oldest son lives in the Long Beach area, but has a piece of property out in some terrible looking place called Pahrump, Nevada. Properties sell there for a song. I was just thinking that if you could actually get out of town ( a challenge in itself in LA) this might be an area a person could hole up in until the society resets. If I lived in LA I *think* I would look for an affordable piece of property somewhat isolated and put a shipping container or some such thing out there where I could stash some stuff and plan on heading there if/when SHTF.

In addition to all the excellent suggestions so far I would like to add that I consider it critical that I have a stock of antibiotics and everyday meds on hand. You've likely already had first aid or first responder training so be sure to include a comprehensive IFAK. I like to keep a good supply of seasoning in my storehouse because you can make some fo the gosh darndest nasty stuff tasy with a little salt and pepper ;-) Fire, water and shelter are all criticals on my list.
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:18   #19
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How about a well? That's if the water stops coming in from the city which is about the last thing that I would expect and if it did happen I would GOOD RFN before the natives go wild.
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:42   #20
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Bugging out will be a tough one, just getting anything away from L.A. will be almost impossible because of the proximity and density of population. There might be some areas in the Inland and High Desert that can still be doable if it is removed from the road enough.

I have to retrofit the rain gutters like my buddy, and then I can collect rainwater. He retrofitted everything to include some spouts or something for water.
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