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Old 03-15-2013, 20:09   #801
JohnnyE
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Originally Posted by PhotoFeller View Post
Your sincerity is apparent, and I'm not pokin' at you or anyone else.

I'm just trying to figure out our penchant for C1 with a Glock despite minimal risk of attack while we blithely accept other, more dangerous threats with little or no special effort to avert the danger.

I posted the murder facts in my area, 'cause thats where I live. CNN reports mean little in my environment. I feel the freedom to behave without fear of something very, very, very unlikely to happen. On the other hand, I am truly concerned about getting hit by some fool texting in moving traffic; so, I drive more defensively than ever before. I've stopped climbing to heights on ladders with my bad knees because there are so many serious brain and spinal cord injuries due to falls from them. I won't tow my granddaughters on a tube behind my boat because of the danger from drunk, careless boat operators. That's reality to me.

You'll be safe and responsible. Most others will, too. Have a great, safe weekend.
I am enjoying this discussion. I sense there appears to be, in a coarse way, two types of risk. I am terming one type to be "external" risks. For instance, that created by the other person texting while driving, or the drunken boater cutting across the tow line or granddaughters' tube. It's the behavior of others, usually negligent, that may result in my downfall.

Then there are "internal" risks, or those over which I have direct control, like deciding whether my knees are sound enough to climb a ladder, or, more on point, am I careful and skillful enough at reholstering, or does my holster securely retain my pistol and guard the trigger.

I offer this as it appears the discussion is bouncing between the two without recognition of how individuals may view risk due to the environment around them versus risk tied to their own skill, judgment or competency.
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Old 03-15-2013, 20:58   #802
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Originally Posted by JohnnyE View Post
I am enjoying this discussion. I sense there appears to be, in a coarse way, two types of risk. I am terming one type to be "external" risks. For instance, that created by the other person texting while driving, or the drunken boater cutting across the tow line or granddaughters' tube. It's the behavior of others, usually negligent, that may result in my downfall.

Then there are "internal" risks, or those over which I have direct control, like deciding whether my knees are sound enough to climb a ladder, or, more on point, am I careful and skillful enough at reholstering, or does my holster securely retain my pistol and guard the trigger.

I offer this as it appears the discussion is bouncing between the two without recognition of how individuals may view risk due to the environment around them versus risk tied to their own skill, judgment or competency.
Using your classifications in the context of SD, I agree "internal" covers most of our judgement calls with respect to what, when, where and how we behave with a firearm. It also covers situational awareness and how we maneuver around in our environment. Risk assessment falls on this side of the ledger.

An attacker's decision to put us down is "external".

I've been saying that our perception of the external risks (probability) should determine our internal risk aversion actions (SD, defensive driving, tubing in the morning while the lake is calm and safe).

The decision to use a Glock in C1 means the external risk of attack is greater than the internal risk of ND. Here, the external and internal intersect to force a key SD decision.

I guess it does help to put these things in different baskets.

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-15-2013 at 21:10..
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Old 03-15-2013, 23:01   #803
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Originally Posted by PhotoFeller View Post
Why do we look at the risk of criminal attack through a different lens than the risk of a school bus accident? I'm not arguing against CC or C1, but I am asking why we approach criminal attack one way (train, practice, participate in GT, and invest in equipment against a possible outcome regardless of probability) and common daily activities (proceed because probability is acceptable) in a totally different way.
That is an excellent point, as well as is this one …
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Originally Posted by vandros View Post
So, we basically justify owning/carrying guns by focusing on low-probability but high-severity events, like being mugged, robbed, attacked, killed. Thinking about how horrible these events are helps us reduce dissonance. Think about how unlikely these events are increases dissonance. So, we are psychologically predisposed to focus more on how horrible these events are, and predisposed to avoid thinking about how unlikely these events are. This obviously does not describe situation of military, leos, or people living/working in ghettos where these horrible events have high probability.
Which is why I began to realistically evaluate my odds of suffering a ND/AD compared to the odds of ever having to draw a gun in self-defense. And again, what prompted me to look closely at my particular lifestyle was the many testimonials from other Glock Talk members detailing their own experiences with these events.
So for me it was a decision to carry in C3 as this is the safest method for my normal routine, consistent with recognition that I have the choice to arm myself against the lesser chance of encountering a life-or-death situation.
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Old 03-15-2013, 23:48   #804
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Are there alot of AD/ND associated with the Glock pistols? I've only read of one on here, someone fill me in please.
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Old 03-16-2013, 00:12   #805
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Are there alot of AD/ND associated with the Glock pistols? I've only read of one on here, someone fill me in please.
There have been several threads here on Glock Talk where members have recounted their ND/AD experiences.

I'm sure they're not all associated with Glock pistols but rather dealing with distractions that caused the person to momentarily forget the gun was "hot". These incidents occur with Glocks, Sig Sauers, HKs, Rugers, etc ...

After reading a number of these testimonials I don't believe the design of the gun is central to the issue but rather the familiarity with handling the firearm or mental distractions that led to the incidents. (Maybe that's one and the same thing)
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Old 03-16-2013, 00:14   #806
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Originally Posted by unit1069 View Post
There have been several threads here on Glock Talk where members have recounted their ND/AD experiences.

I'm sure they're not all associated with Glock pistols but rather dealing with distractions that caused the person to momentarily forget the gun was "hot".

After reading a number of these testimonials I don't believe the design of the gun is central to the issue but rather the familiarity with handling the firearm or mental distractions that led to the incidents. (Maybe that's one and the same thing)

I got ya, thanks for the reply.
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Old 03-16-2013, 10:55   #807
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Gun hot and ready to go. Might as well carry a hammer instead if you're not gonna chamber a round. Your gun isn't gonna get mad and just decide to shoot you in the thigh.
This is correct. You will only be able to respond to a sudden attack with a blunt object (gun without a round in the chamber & ready to fire) if you do not continuously keep a round in the chamber.
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Old 03-17-2013, 04:40   #808
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PhotoFeller, you are a very thoughtful, intelligent person. Your posts exude the epitome of reasonableness.

However, there is something that calls me to respond.

We don't live in Mayberry. You may live in a very safe, perhaps gated community, where the worst thing that might happen is having your restful night disturbed by a barking dog.

I'm happy for you.

But most folks aren't so fortunate.

C1 is my preferred carry. At home, where there's very little chance of something bad going down. But it's so easy for someone to break in, and even with alarms and so on, I don't trust myself to get upstairs to a firearm to take care of business if someone is between me and my gun. Best place for my gun is on me, ready to go. And that means C1.

Over and out.




Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoFeller View Post
Your sincerity is apparent, and I'm not pokin' at you or anyone else.

I'm just trying to figure out our penchant for C1 with a Glock despite minimal risk of attack while we blithely accept other, more dangerous threats with little or no special effort to avert the danger.

I posted the murder facts in my area, 'cause thats where I live. CNN reports mean little in my environment. I feel the freedom to behave without fear of something very, very, very unlikely to happen. On the other hand, I am truly concerned about getting hit by some fool texting in moving traffic; so, I drive more defensively than ever before. I've stopped climbing to heights on ladders with my bad knees because there are so many serious brain and spinal cord injuries due to falls from them. I won't tow my granddaughters on a tube behind my boat because of the danger from drunk, careless boat operators. That's reality to me.

You'll be safe and responsible. Most others will, too. Have a great, safe weekend.
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Old 03-17-2013, 14:07   #809
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Originally Posted by Smooth_squeeze View Post
PhotoFeller-

We don't live in Mayberry. You may live in a very safe, perhaps gated community, where the worst thing that might happen is having your restful night disturbed by a barking dog.

But most folks aren't so fortunate.

C1 is my preferred carry. At home, where there's very little chance of something bad going down. But it's so easy for someone to break in, and even with alarms and so on, I don't trust myself to get upstairs to a firearm to take care of business if someone is between me and my gun. Best place for my gun is on me, ready to go. And that means C1.

Over and out.
Roger that.

This thread has taught me that my circumstances are different from a lot of folks who perceive they truly need the split-second advantage of C1.

I've lived in my community since 2004. I've read the local crime reports and studied the crime statistics going back 10 years. The crime location map for my county clearly shows the areas where most criminal activity occurs. Murder is very rare, and it almost always stems from domestic quarrels and drug activity.

Absent some highly unusual encounter with a perp, the probability of being attacked where I live and travel about...if I take reasonable precautions...is near zero.

If you've thought it through and made the decision that C1 is necessary and appropriate, given your level of competence with a gun, thats the way for you to go.

I hope you stay safe from all dangers. Being smart about how we live each day is the only way to insure safe passage.

Good luck.

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-17-2013 at 15:47..
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Old 03-17-2013, 19:49   #810
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Carrying a firearm without a chambered round is lke having a hammer with bring the nails. In my humble opinion. It is essential that anyone carrying for self defense or protection in general must become proficient and confident (read - good) with what they carry as to have no room for fear because they are full of competence, or please consider not carrying, you may be arming the bad guy in the worst case scenario! This is really important and could be the difference between success and the other chioce!
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Old 03-17-2013, 20:02   #811
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Carrying a firearm without a chambered round is lke having a hammer with bring the nails. In my humble opinion. It is essential that anyone carrying for self defense or protection in general must become proficient and confident (read - good) with what they carry as to have no room for fear because they are full of competence, or please consider not carrying, you may be arming the bad guy in the worst case scenario! This is really important and could be the difference between success and the other chioce!
Think about this for a moment:

C1 = 1 in the chamber with 15 rounds in the mag.
C3 = 0 in the chamber with 15 rounds in the mag.

What scenario do you actually expect to face where C1 would save your life but C3 would not? Think about your actual daily activities; where might the attack happen that would catch you completely off guard?

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-18-2013 at 02:09..
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Old 03-18-2013, 06:37   #812
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IMHO, CC in C3 is like having a revolver with an empty cylinder under the hammer, and that's just silly.

Wake up and smell the coffee. Please don't be a victim.
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Old 03-18-2013, 07:29   #813
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Folks, the C3 Adamants (my name for those who adamantly believe in C3) may unintentionally be setting you up for a disaster when a attack is upon you. For those who are unsure how they should carry, if you have any doubt, please follow the advice of veteran concealed carriers, and while you are at it, if you know any police officers, or military personnel, bounce the idea off them. Every single policeman or veteran has told me C1, without a moment's hesitation.

If you are uncomfortable with carrying in C1, get training, and get comfortable. Practice with it. It may just save your life. And please do not overthink all this stuff. If you personally are afraid you may accidentally fire off a round if you carry in C1, get the training and practice, practice, practice.

IMHO, thinking about all the places you go and preparing to deal with a life threatening situation is good if you are even sometimes in places where bad things go down. Do you ever go to the bank? Or convenience stores? Or Walmarts? Or Sears? Or the gas station? Or anywhere outside your home? If you do, bad stuff can happen almost anywhere, including in police stations. Just because it is illegal for someone to carry a gun into a police station doesn't mean that bad stuff can't happen there. Or just about anywhere, including in your home.

Overthink this and carry in C3 and you may not live to tell about it. My humble opinion.
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Old 03-18-2013, 07:42   #814
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My S&W Mod. 36 save my arse twice......if any of you who carry unloaded ever had a CQB experience in the dark of the early morning like I've had....you'd be singing a different tune......no question.
If your going to carry.....make sure you carry +1....trouble doesn't make an appointment.
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Old 03-18-2013, 07:53   #815
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Folks, the C3 Adamants (my name for those who adamantly believe in C3) may unintentionally be setting you up for a disaster when a attack is upon you. For those who are unsure how they should carry, if you have any doubt, please follow the advice of veteran concealed carriers, and while you are at it, if you know any police officers, or military personnel, bounce the idea off them. Every single policeman or veteran has told me C1, without a moment's hesitation.

If you are uncomfortable with carrying in C1, get training, and get comfortable. Practice with it. It may just save your life. And please do not overthink all this stuff. If you personally are afraid you may accidentally fire off a round if you carry in C1, get the training and practice, practice, practice.

IMHO, thinking about all the places you go and preparing to deal with a life threatening situation is good if you are even sometimes in places where bad things go down. Do you ever go to the bank? Or convenience stores? Or Walmarts? Or Sears? Or the gas station? Or anywhere outside your home? If you do, bad stuff can happen almost anywhere, including in police stations. Just because it is illegal for someone to carry a gun into a police station doesn't mean that bad stuff can't happen there. Or just about anywhere, including in your home.

Overthink this and carry in C3 and you may not live to tell about it. My humble opinion.
I don't think "overthinking" is a bad thing, especially if you consider yourself to be intelligent person, you are facing a very important decision, and you have time to ponder it.

If you ask "police officers or military personnel" for carry advice, of course, they'll suggest c1. That makes total sense to them - people (often well trained) are actively trying to kill them every single day. Are you seriously saying that people carrying out rescue missions in Faluja or eliminating high-value terrorist targets in south Afghanistan are facing the same circumstances as people in rural Montana?! Being conditioned to operating in these environments, c1 is the only option police/military heard about, practiced, and that's the only option they should be using. If you ask these folks for self defense advice, they'd also highly recommend bullet-proof vest, a helmet, and ar-15 to be always on your person...

Just as having glock in c3 can kill you if you are unexpectedly attacked, recommending c1 to people who do not need it can also "unintentionally be setting them up for a disaster." Carrying glocks in c3 and c1 can be deadly, for very different reasons. The big decision, and the point many of us have been trying to make in this thread is: One should do a VERY careful threat assessment (that involves assessing one's circumstances, abilities, etc) to pick his carry mode, not just blindly follow some cookie-cutter advice received from someone who might not thoroughly understand you or all of your circumstances.
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Old 03-18-2013, 12:04   #816
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Originally Posted by Smooth_squeeze View Post
Folks, the C3 Adamants (my name for those who adamantly believe in C3) may unintentionally be setting you up for a disaster when a attack is upon you. For those who are unsure how they should carry, if you have any doubt, please follow the advice of veteran concealed carriers, and while you are at it, if you know any police officers, or military personnel, bounce the idea off them. Every single policeman or veteran has told me C1, without a moment's hesitation.

If you are uncomfortable with carrying in C1, get training, and get comfortable. Practice with it. It may just save your life. And please do not overthink all this stuff. If you personally are afraid you may accidentally fire off a round if you carry in C1, get the training and practice, practice, practice.

IMHO, thinking about all the places you go and preparing to deal with a life threatening situation is good if you are even sometimes in places where bad things go down. Do you ever go to the bank? Or convenience stores? Or Walmarts? Or Sears? Or the gas station? Or anywhere outside your home? If you do, bad stuff can happen almost anywhere, including in police stations. Just because it is illegal for someone to carry a gun into a police station doesn't mean that bad stuff can't happen there. Or just about anywhere, including in your home.

Overthink this and carry in C3 and you may not live to tell about it. My humble opinion.
I am "adamant" only in asking people to thoughtfully decide about carry mode. If you really believe you're in danger at home and everywhere you go, who am I to say you're not? You may live in LA, surrounded by gangs and drug dealers.

I have honestly tried to imagine places or circumstances where I might be attacked out of the blue by someone intent on killing me, and I can't think of any. I am not afraid to go to the bank, but I don't use the drive through money machine after business hours. I don't prowl around at night on foot, anywhere. I go to church and the dentist without fear. I visit my granddaughters' schools without fear. My life is centered on the premise that if I live sensibly, I can enjoy the freedom of not being fearful every hour of every day. If there might be a bad guy behind every bush, I'll just stay out of the bushes.

Live with fear of surprise attack at home and everywhere else if you choose to. Remain in a truly dangerous community, if you must. If you feel the need to carry C1, 24/7, by all means consider your gun to be an important part of your everyday life. Do whatever floats your boat.

By the way, smooth_squeeze, just because we see the world differently doesn't mean I'm saying you're wrong. We just see things from a different perspective.

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-18-2013 at 13:22..
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Old 03-18-2013, 13:55   #817
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Roger that!

Actually, I live in a very safe community. Just checked out the spot crime stats and found nothing. That may be because the bad guys know that just about everyone has guns in their home. And open carry without a permit is legal. Same thing in a car. Also, it's a shall-issue state. I like that, really I do. Helps keep crime under check. Nevertheless, while I don't live in "fear", I have been the victim of violent crimes in the past. Not going to recount it here, but believe me when I say it can happen in what seem to be the safest places. That said, aside from wanting to be ready if something bad happens, I like the feel of being armed. Just like I love our military, the police, fire fighters, and so on. I think being armed reasonably is part of being a man. Karate and other martial arts are valuable, and having a sidearm is a bonus. Finding yourself in a bad situation without adequate means to defend yourself can be terrifying. I believe in Ronald Reagan's "peace through strength." However, as the years go on, my physical limitations have helped me to be wiser. To me, C1 is the way to go. For others, like you, C3 is preferred. That's fine. I hope you never have the need to use a gun in self defense, and if you do I hope you can do whatever is nesessary.

Focus in this area, as in so many others in life, is the key.

Peace...

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Originally Posted by PhotoFeller View Post
I am "adamant" only in asking people to thoughtfully decide about carry mode. If you really believe you're in danger at home and everywhere you go, who am I to say you're not? You may live in LA, surrounded by gangs and drug dealers.

I have honestly tried to imagine places or circumstances where I might be attacked out of the blue by someone intent on killing me, and I can't think of any. I am not afraid to go to the bank, but I don't use the drive through money machine after business hours. I don't prowl around at night on foot, anywhere. I go to church and the dentist without fear. I visit my granddaughters' schools without fear. My life is centered on the premise that if I live sensibly, I can enjoy the freedom of not being fearful every hour of every day. If there might be a bad guy behind every bush, I'll just stay out of the bushes.

Live with fear of surprise attack at home and everywhere else if you choose to. Remain in a truly dangerous community, if you must. If you feel the need to carry C1, 24/7, by all means consider your gun to be an important part of your everyday life. Do whatever floats your boat.

By the way, smooth_squeeze, just because we see the world differently doesn't mean I'm saying you're wrong. We just see things from a different perspective.
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Old 03-18-2013, 17:08   #818
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Roger that!

Actually, I live in a very safe community. Just checked out the spot crime stats and found nothing. That may be because the bad guys know that just about everyone has guns in their home. And open carry without a permit is legal. Same thing in a car. Also, it's a shall-issue state. I like that, really I do. Helps keep crime under check. Nevertheless, while I don't live in "fear", I have been the victim of violent crimes in the past. Not going to recount it here, but believe me when I say it can happen in what seem to be the safest places. That said, aside from wanting to be ready if something bad happens, I like the feel of being armed. Just like I love our military, the police, fire fighters, and so on. I think being armed reasonably is part of being a man. Karate and other martial arts are valuable, and having a sidearm is a bonus. Finding yourself in a bad situation without adequate means to defend yourself can be terrifying. I believe in Ronald Reagan's "peace through strength." However, as the years go on, my physical limitations have helped me to be wiser. To me, C1 is the way to go. For others, like you, C3 is preferred. That's fine. I hope you never have the need to use a gun in self defense, and if you do I hope you can do whatever is nesessary.

Focus in this area, as in so many others in life, is the key.

Peace...
I appreciate your statement. It helps everyone understand your views, not that you need to explain them.

Peace and good health be with you, too.

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Old 03-18-2013, 18:39   #819
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Roger that!

Actually, I live in a very safe community. Just checked out the spot crime stats and found nothing. That may be because the bad guys know that just about everyone has guns in their home. And open carry without a permit is legal. Same thing in a car. Also, it's a shall-issue state. I like that, really I do. Helps keep crime under check. Nevertheless, while I don't live in "fear", I have been the victim of violent crimes in the past. Not going to recount it here, but believe me when I say it can happen in what seem to be the safest places. That said, aside from wanting to be ready if something bad happens, I like the feel of being armed. Just like I love our military, the police, fire fighters, and so on. I think being armed reasonably is part of being a man. Karate and other martial arts are valuable, and having a sidearm is a bonus. Finding yourself in a bad situation without adequate means to defend yourself can be terrifying. I believe in Ronald Reagan's "peace through strength." However, as the years go on, my physical limitations have helped me to be wiser. To me, C1 is the way to go. For others, like you, C3 is preferred. That's fine. I hope you never have the need to use a gun in self defense, and if you do I hope you can do whatever is nesessary.

Focus in this area, as in so many others in life, is the key.

Peace...
What state? It sounds like VT . . . . .
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Old 03-18-2013, 20:38   #820
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Interesting thread here about a guy who had to draw his gun last Friday. Was surprised in a well-lit area. Just goes to show you that you just never know when and how fast a confrontation will occur:

http://smith-wessonforum.com/conceal...ast-night.html
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Old 03-19-2013, 05:05   #821
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Roger that!

Nevertheless, while I don't live in "fear", I have been the victim of violent crimes in the past. Not going to recount it here, but believe me when I say it can happen in what seem to be the safest.
Peace...
Can you say at what age you were attacked? Did situational awareness fail you?

I'm not searching for details of where or how your attack(s) happened.

I know that from age 18 to my mid 20s, I ventured into many situations that were potentially dangerous. After hours spots, beverage emporiums in questionable areas, off-post GI clubs and all-night restaurants were occassional destinations. That stage of my life could have been disastrous. I wondered if your attack might have happened during a similar, adventurous stage.

When I was out and about in the old days, situational awareness wasn't top of mind. Our only defense was traveling in pairs and small groups. A surprise attack during that period wouldn't have been too surprising.

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Old 03-19-2013, 08:53   #822
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Can you say at what age you were attacked? Did situational awareness fail you?

I'm not searching for details of where or how your attack(s) happened.

I know that from age 18 to my mid 20s, I ventured into many situations that were potentially dangerous. After hours spots, beverage emporiums in questionable areas, off-post GI clubs and all-night restaurants were occassional destinations. That stage of my life could have been disastrous. I wondered if your attack might have happened during a similar, adventurous stage.

When I was out and about in the old days, situational awareness wasn't top of mind. Our only defense was traveling in pairs and small groups. A surprise attack during that period wouldn't have been too surprising.
I know you didn’t ask this of me but I can tell you a little story about needing protection at home, ready to go.

I lived just on the edge of downtown FortWorth Texas. I was the manager of 3 apartment houses and lived in one of the houses I managed. It had a "commons" area in the main floor area, 2 apartments off the commons and one on the second floor. I lived in the one on the second floor.

One of my tenants from another house had a visitor (a parolee who was absconded) that was staying for an extended period of time. He had been released on parole for only 2 1/2 weeks when he got high, drunk or a combination of both and decided not to go to work that night and asked if my fiancé would work for him...it was a job that paid daily and Doug was always willing to work for extra cash.

That night, while my fiancé was gone, he came over and knocked on the door. This was the day before Thanksgiving, 1990. I didn't own a gun and I had a recent back injury so my strength wasn't what I would have hoped for. He told me that my tenant was talking about committing suicide and would only talk to me. I liked the tenant, he was a good guy...his name was Robert. I unlocked the 6 locks on the door and the parolee (Felix) shoved the door open violently. I pressed my back against the wall for support and shoved the door closed. I managed to get 4 of the locks relocked and he kicked the door in breaking the frame of the door and a few of the locks. (the locks that didn't break were still locked and attached to both the door and the broken frame).

He had a large piece of broken glass that he used as a weapon against me. This is where I wish I had a gun, but we were not financially able to buy one, and truthfully...we probably would not have bought one if we were as we didn't think anything like that would happen. I was 23...I was clueless about the chances of something bad like that happening. Even after this happened, it was still several years before I got one. 2005, when I got the first notice he was going to come up for parole. He told me if I told, if he was arrested and if I testified against him, he would kill me when he was released.

I knew he was serious when he made that threat. He was a 5 time felon. He told me "next time, I won't leave a witness". I know he will kill if he is ever released. He is in his 50's now, and claims he just wants to get released so he can marry his fiancé (how does a person who has been in prison for 23 years get a fiancé?) He told the parole director that he would NEVER be back if he was allowed parole. I know why he would say that...remember, he wouldn't leave a witness next time. I said that to the parole director when he contacted me about this most recent parole hearings, a couple months ago.

If I had a gun when he first broke in to my home, I would not have to re-live this every 3 years now. But if I didn't have "one in the chamber" ready to fire, I wouldn't have had a chance against him. The only way I lived through this was that I made him believe I might be willing to have a relationship and meet him again. I'm ashamed for having done that...but I wanted to live.

I have trained and trained and trained. I have taken self-defense classes with my first CCW instructor. It was scenario based training...car jacking (1 to 5 attackers), restaurant confrontation, lights out/night time/woke up from sleep. I carry C1, the gun is only locked up when I'm on the road and going through an area I'm not covered to carry. I don't call myself a victim, I'm a survivor. I WILL be ready if I need to be. I am aware of my surroundings all the time and don't even allow myself to let down my guard at home. The doors are always locked, and my gun is always with me. If not on my side, it is by my side.

Sorry for the longwinded reply...thought it might be worth adding this to the thread.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:18   #823
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Virginia.

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Originally Posted by SCmasterblaster View Post
What state? It sounds like VT . . . . .
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Old 03-19-2013, 16:07   #824
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Lady Glock-

Your story contains several important lessons, but your need to be armed at home and away, and being well trained, is abundantly clear.

Violent attacks do happen, and only a fool would deny it. No one knows better than you.

I hope people will read and think about your experience. It provides a good case study in how acquaintances (in your case a tenant) can provide a conduit for dangerous people to come into our lives. Allowing outsiders, especially those with a criminal history, to penetrate our zone of home safety must be tactfully but diligently avoided.

Sometimes we are trapped by financial circumstances in an undesirable situation that leads to violence. Family and friendship complications can also draw us into dangerous situations. Situational awareness includes being keenly sensitive to inner-circle risks and avoiding any danger that might result. No action to avoid a deadly encounter is too extreme. My recent reading about murder cases indicates the attackers most often are people we know.

Thanks for sharing your experiences. Personal accounts of actual attacks really add substance to this conversation.

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-20-2013 at 14:04..
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Old 03-19-2013, 16:35   #825
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Just finished reading and writing this. Naturally I just had to share it with all of you guys.

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/show...3#post20104493

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Originally Posted by Snowman92D View Post
Here's a short article on the subject: http://www.tactical-life.com/tactica...mossad-22-lrs/
Quote:
Rachamim recently advised Tactical Weapons that during the commando raid on the Sabena Airline jet in 1972, he carried two spare magazines for his issued Beretta. After drawing his pistol and racking the slide, Rachamim recalls charging at one of the male terrorists while he “stabbed” his pistol out in front of him toward his target as he, “released rounds.” As he fired his pistol, Rachamim remembered being close enough to see some of his bullets hit the mark. The sight of blood draining from the dead hijacker’s mouth confirmed that the terrorist he engaged inside the crowded cabin would no longer pose a threat.
Thank you so much for that!

The above is a REAL WORLD example of what I’ve spent so much time trying to explain (without much success ) to all of these C-1 carry, ‘Glockeroo Cowboys’, here, on Glock Talk. (This, also, parallels my own REAL WORLD life experience; and, ‘puts the lie’ to much of these always popular, but, largely pseudointellectual remarks about the presumed vital necessity for C-1 carry.)

IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO ENDANGER, BOTH, YOURSELF AND EVERYONE ELSE WITH LOADED CHAMBER (C-1) CARRY IN ORDER TO BE EFFECTIVE WITH A PISTOL. WHAT A COMPETENT PISTOLERO REALLY HAS TO BE IS,

(1) POSSESSED OF A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF REAL WORLD (LIFE) EXPERIENCE,

(2) DEMONSTRABLY SKILLED AT HIS CRAFT, AND

(3) PERSONALLY DISCIPLINED WITH THE RIGHT MENTAL AND EMOTIONAL ATTITUDES.


If someone sporting a carry pistol lacks the proper training, as well as ALL of the above physical and psychological prerequisites then, as far as I’m concerned, that person is no better than just another dangerous social goofball with a loaded gun who’s, out there, walking around in public - A goofball who constitutes himself as a viable potential threat to everyone with whom he comes into personal contact, including himself.

(I doubt, though, that I’m going to garner any, ‘merit badges’ for continuing to point this out!)

REFERENCE: http://www.tactical-life.com/tactica...mossad-22-lrs/

Last edited by Arc Angel; 03-19-2013 at 16:37..
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