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Old 03-12-2013, 14:19   #776
Zeebra724
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Originally Posted by bigcreekguns View Post
I always have a round in the chamber because I understand that my pistol hand may be the only one free when I need it. If I have to draw, I want to be able to shoot in the same motion. Unless someone is ADD I can't imagine leaving an empty chamber that must be filled before I can protect myself or loved ones.
I agree...well said!
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Old 03-12-2013, 14:40   #777
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Originally Posted by Lady Glock View Post
I've carried a G30, .45 calibur, chambered for almost 6 years and (knock on wood) it hasn't shot me yet. I use a Galco IWB holster, but I also have the composite OWB holster for it too. I'm more comfortable with the IWB, so that's my primary holster. When you draw the gun, train yourself to keep your trigger finger straight until the gun has cleared the holster and is pointed at your target. It's truly a very simple move. Plus...I have been taught by my instructor that if you have to complete more than 3 moves in a SHTF scenario, you will not be able to remember what to do and you will fail at protecting yourself and/or others. The key here is TRAIN, TRAIN, TRAIN. The more time you have training, the better your odds will be if you need to react to a real life ordeal. You can even train at home, just make sure to empty your gun, remove the magazine, clear the chamber, triple check that you have done all of these before pointing your gun at anything. I practiced by pointing at my TV while watching the news. I had an issue with "jerking" the trigger...I practiced for hours using a slow squeeze to avoid doing that. Practicing will help more than anything else....get in some range time!!!!
I keep a spare unloaded magazine in my study just for home training and trigger discipline. It sits in a belt mag carrier and serves my purposes as you spoke of here. Training teaches many things; improving accuracy, point shooting, followup shots, quick reloads from dry to tactical, and a host of other things. Perhaps the best thing to come out of training is muscle memory (for lack of a better term). That ability to do what you have trained for without having to think about it and to do it quickly. You can't read that in a book or watch it on a video... you have to do it many, many times.

Good post.


BTW, I am having back surgery in two weeks. I have lumbar spinal stenosis and am getting the MILD procedure done. Can't wait because the pain is excruciating.
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:50   #778
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Originally Posted by SouthernBoyVA View Post
I keep a spare unloaded magazine in my study just for home training and trigger discipline. It sits in a belt mag carrier and serves my purposes as you spoke of here. Training teaches many things; improving accuracy, point shooting, followup shots, quick reloads from dry to tactical, and a host of other things. Perhaps the best thing to come out of training is muscle memory (for lack of a better term). That ability to do what you have trained for without having to think about it and to do it quickly. You can't read that in a book or watch it on a video... you have to do it many, many times.

Good post.


BTW, I am having back surgery in two weeks. I have lumbar spinal stenosis and am getting the MILD procedure done. Can't wait because the pain is excruciating.
Best of luck to you with the surgery. Mine was a remove, replace with a spacer and fuse at L5/S1...November surgery, pain is still horrible! I had 4 different shots before they finally agreed the surgery was the only chance for improvement.
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Old 03-13-2013, 18:56   #779
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Posted purely for reference material:

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showpost...6&postcount=75

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I have often given my story as an example of how ANYONE can have an accident with a gun, no matter how expert you are with them.
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Old 03-13-2013, 19:28   #780
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One in the chamber for sure. In the right holster of course.

That one time you may need it, that chambered round could save your life, or a loved one. Don't risk that.
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Old 03-13-2013, 19:30   #781
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Not carrying a round in the chamber is like Barney Fife not having a round in his service revolver. Welcome to Mayberry!
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Old 03-13-2013, 19:48   #782
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Not carrying a round in the chamber is like Barney Fife not having a round in his service revolver. Welcome to Mayberry!
Actually it was completely empty, it made the gun too heavy.
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Old 03-13-2013, 22:16   #783
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Not carrying a round in the chamber is like Barney Fife not having a round in his service revolver. Welcome to Mayberry!
You are right, actually.

Barney didn't need bullets in Mayberry because the absence of threat meant it wasn't necessary to carry a loaded firearm. His revolver was just part of the uniform. Sheriff Taylor didn't even carry an empty gun.

My uncle was town marshal in the rural community where I grew up, and he didn't carry a gun either. People who resisted arrest were tamed with an introduction to his trusty blackjack.

C3 reflects the extremely low risk of attack in my real world. It doesn't work everywhere, but it does in my environment.

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Old 03-14-2013, 05:08   #784
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...

C3 reflects the extremely low risk of attack in my real world. It doesn't work everywhere, but it does in my environment.
Probably the best analogy is demonstrated in the Harrison Ford movie, Witness. Many people live in the Harrison Ford world where you can get jumped any time, even in the John. Others live in a quiet and open space place where you can't jump anyone in surprise and where you can copulate on a rocking chair in the front porch and no one would be around to see. LOL

Hickok45 probably lives in the quiet world, as you can see in his videos on YouTube.

The general strategy for many is to work hard in the Harrison world, then get enough dough to retire in the "front porch" world. Some of us never made it out.
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Old 03-14-2013, 08:24   #785
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Unless you are a uniformed LE/MIL...chances of you not having enough time to chamber a round from C3 are very slim.

Get some training and practice, practice, practice. Facts are more NDs occur from C1 with Glock.

I would rather carry a Sig in C1 and a Glock in C3.

I am the minority view on this board. But that is fine by me. I know who I have trained, been trained by and trained with. I will stick with C3.
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Old 03-14-2013, 09:16   #786
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One of the best features of this thread is that some people have stepped up and said "I carry C3", without reservation. Thats good simply because balance makes for a better discussion.

I've been doing my own informal survey of 7/11s, pharmacies, carry-out food joints and other businesses that are open late at night or all night, to find out their experience regarding 'trouble' caused by criminals, drunks or other violent types. I don't talk to supervisors who might want to protect their store image. I try to speak to female employees.

In my town I have yet to find an employee who knows about a history of trouble or expresses any fear about working the night shift. What does this result tell us? Not much, except these particular places of business apparently are not magnets for bad guys looking to score a robbery, or shoot or stab somebody for the hell of it. In some communities, the record would be quite different. In my Mayberry, things are pretty quiet.

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Old 03-14-2013, 11:59   #787
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I've noticed in threads about this topic everyone assumes someone carrying without a round in the chamber think the gun is going to randomly shoot them.

I am new to CCW and I don't chamber a round...yet. Maybe at some point I will get to where I am comfortable with that but not now.

I understand the internal Glock safeties and trust it won't discharge without the trigger being pulled. I got a Galco King Tuck holster and trust (because i've tried) the only way to pull the trigger with the gun in the holster is to have something like a shirt tangled in the trigger guard (don't worry I used snap caps to test this).

My concern with carrying one in the chamber is this...In the heat of the moment, I need my gun for SD and with the adrenaline pumping as I draw my gun my finger twitches and pulls the trigger prematurely. That is my concern.

I have been practicing un-holstering and re-holstering my gun daily (with snap caps of course). I'm trying to get used to it to where I can trust I won't pull the trigger early even in the heat of the moment. I'm not sure I am there yet. Any words of wisdom on this?
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:09   #788
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Words of wisdom? Get professional training. There's simply no substitute for it.
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Old 03-14-2013, 13:12   #789
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I envy folks who live in Mayberry. I carry C1 because of the cash I pick up from stores I own in lower class urban neighborhoods that are widely known to serve a cash clientle. One store, if you walk out the front entrance and turn to your right, two doors down you pass the bank that gets robbed annually. Four doors further down is the jewelry store where the owner killed his killer in a robbery attempt-turn gun battle. I wonder in what condition he carried, and if that would have made a difference that day. Everyone in the neighborhood was on the lookout for the second perp who got away and remained at-large for over a week. At a second store I often stay the night in a small apartment in the back. That store was burglarized twice in one week, and another time it took five uniformed officers to exit a "customer" trying to shake us down. Yup, C1 when I'm out and about...after training and lots of practice. Remington 870 at the ready in the apartment.

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Old 03-14-2013, 13:26   #790
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I envy folks who live in Mayberry. I carry C1 because of the cash I pick up from stores I own in lower class urban neighborhoods that are widely known to serve a cash clientle. One store, if you walk out the front entrance and turn to your right, two doors down you pass the bank that gets robbed annually. Four doors further down is the jewelry store where the owner killed his killer in a robbery attempt-turn gun battle. I wonder in what condition he carried, and if that would have made a difference that day. Everyone in the neighborhood was on the lookout for the second perp who got away and remained at-large for over a week. At a second store I often stay the night in a small apartment in the back. That store was burglarized twice in one week, and another time it took five uniformed officers to exit a "customer" trying to shake us down. Yup, C1 when I'm out and about...after training and lots of practice. Remington 870 at the ready in the apartment.
Wow! I'd be using c1 for sure, if I were in your position (perhaps also having 2 glocks on me at a time).
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Old 03-14-2013, 16:16   #791
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I envy folks who live in Mayberry. I carry C1 because of the cash I pick up from stores I own in lower class urban neighborhoods that are widely known to serve a cash clientle. One store, if you walk out the front entrance and turn to your right, two doors down you pass the bank that gets robbed annually. Four doors further down is the jewelry store where the owner killed his killer in a robbery attempt-turn gun battle. I wonder in what condition he carried, and if that would have made a difference that day. Everyone in the neighborhood was on the lookout for the second perp who got away and remained at-large for over a week. At a second store I often stay the night in a small apartment in the back. That store was burglarized twice in one week, and another time it took five uniformed officers to exit a "customer" trying to shake us down. Yup, C1 when I'm out and about...after training and lots of practice. Remington 870 at the ready in the apartment.
Your situation is clearly one that warrants C1. The risk level is high. The danger is real.

There are environments where I can see the reasonableness of open carry, and yours would be one. If the property is yours, or even if you rent it, OC might be an option while you're in the stores.

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Old 03-14-2013, 16:39   #792
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I've noticed in threads about this topic everyone assumes someone carrying without a round in the chamber think the gun is going to randomly shoot them.

I am new to CCW and I don't chamber a round...yet. Maybe at some point I will get to where I am comfortable with that but not now.

I understand the internal Glock safeties and trust it won't discharge without the trigger being pulled. I got a Galco King Tuck holster and trust (because i've tried) the only way to pull the trigger with the gun in the holster is to have something like a shirt tangled in the trigger guard (don't worry I used snap caps to test this).

My concern with carrying one in the chamber is this...In the heat of the moment, I need my gun for SD and with the adrenaline pumping as I draw my gun my finger twitches and pulls the trigger prematurely. That is my concern.

I have been practicing un-holstering and re-holstering my gun daily (with snap caps of course). I'm trying to get used to it to where I can trust I won't pull the trigger early even in the heat of the moment. I'm not sure I am there yet. Any words of wisdom on this?
Sounds like you're on the right track. Train. Practice. Think about the responsibility and accountability that comes with being armed to kill.

As everyone agrees, your brain is your most important self defense system. Danger avoidance and situational awareness, when practiced diligently, will keep you out of harm's way. These defensive tactics require thought and practice just as drawing and holstering do.

My doc's advice about knee replacement surgery was "You'll know when you are ready for the procedure. Its a big deal, so take your time to make sure you're prepared for it." I think his words of wisdom also apply to carrying C1.

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Old 03-14-2013, 17:12   #793
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Your situation is clearly one that warrants C1. The risk level is high. The danger is real.

There are environments where I can see the reasonableness of open carry, and yours would be one. If the property is yours, or even if you rent it, OC might be an option while you're in the stores.
Open carry isn't a reasonable option because it is NOT a carry-friendly city, either open or concealed. I carry concealed. In the spring and fall, I carry a G27, with a spare G22 mag on the weak side. Super hot summer days, an LCP with two spare mags. Cold weather, it's the G27 with spare G22 mag, and a New York reload (my other G27) concealed elsewhere.

Oh, forgot about one day at my third store. This guy "fell asleep" on the front stoop. One of my guys, a lot bigger than Chumlee, goes to check things out. Here's this guy laying on his side, bleeding from his right calf, hypo still in him, clearly shooting heroin. "Chum" nudges him to get him to move along, and the guy rolls onto his back and there was a pistol in his front waistband. That was it.

Even with several of my folks armed, it just wasn't worth it. A few months later I sold out. THANK GOD.
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Old 03-15-2013, 05:16   #794
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan WA View Post
I've noticed in threads about this topic everyone assumes someone carrying without a round in the chamber think the gun is going to randomly shoot them.

I am new to CCW and I don't chamber a round...yet. Maybe at some point I will get to where I am comfortable with that but not now.

I understand the internal Glock safeties and trust it won't discharge without the trigger being pulled. I got a Galco King Tuck holster and trust (because i've tried) the only way to pull the trigger with the gun in the holster is to have something like a shirt tangled in the trigger guard (don't worry I used snap caps to test this).

My concern with carrying one in the chamber is this...In the heat of the moment, I need my gun for SD and with the adrenaline pumping as I draw my gun my finger twitches and pulls the trigger prematurely. That is my concern.

I have been practicing un-holstering and re-holstering my gun daily (with snap caps of course). I'm trying to get used to it to where I can trust I won't pull the trigger early even in the heat of the moment. I'm not sure I am there yet. Any words of wisdom on this?
Practice, practice, practice. When you practice your draw, be aware of your trigger finger. Keep it STRAIGHT, running along the barrel of the gun. After your gun is clear of the holster and either at the pointed down (if you are not clear where your target is) or pointed at your target position, move the finger into the trigger and pull.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:46   #795
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I believe many people who carry a firearm for self defense, perhaps most, do so without regard to the very low probability of attack in their environment. Probability is ignored in favor of the more popular view that when someone is actually attacked, nothing else matters; the actual outcome trumps the significance of probability or any other analysis.

For folks who are concerned with avoiding attack regardless of how unlikely it might be, conclusions regarding SD (Should I CC? Should I CC 24/7? Should I CC in C1?) are made using a different decision model than many other important questions; the difference is that probability is ignored.

We consider lots of life/death matters each day on the basis of probability. Sometimes its a conscious process and sometimes its a casual, subconscious decision. Often the go-ahead conclusion involves accepting much more risk than the threat of violent attack. Consider the following:

We allow our teenage kids to drive, unsupervised, before their skill and maturity warrant doing so.
We allow our kids to ride a bus to school without seat belts.
We ride a motorcycle, sometimes with a loved one on the back.
We operate a car or truck on busy streets and highways.
We climb stepladders and work at dangerous heights on our homes.
We participate in risky recreational activities (amusement parks, power boats for skiing and tubing, white water rafting, build a swimming pool in our back yard).

We accept the risks of these activities knowing that the outcome could be tragic, deadly. Why do we proceed as though they are 'routine' with little or no analysis, no special training, no purchase of specialized equipment, no forum participation to discuss/debate the dangers and ways to avert them? Somehow, the probability of a terrible outcome is acceptable. I just don't get it.

Why do we look at the risk of criminal attack through a different lens than the risk of a school bus accident? I'm not arguing against CC or C1, but I am asking why we approach criminal attack one way (train, practice, participate in GT, and invest in equipment against a possible outcome regardless of probability) and common daily activities (proceed because probability is acceptable) in a totally different way.

I think this subject is germane to the C1 vs. C3 discussion. The decision to carry C1 reflects maximum preparedness (the fastest most efficient mode) to defend against an attack, the very low probably of which is ignored. Opting to use C1 introduces additional risk to the CC proposition, and the probability of an ND is ignored. We simply ignore reality (probability) because, it seems, ...we want to!

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Old 03-15-2013, 08:47   #796
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I believe many people who carry a firearm for self defense, perhaps most, do so without regard to the very low probability of attack in their environment. Probability is ignored in favor of the more popular view that when someone is actually attacked, the probability of that happening doesn't matter; the actual outcome trumps the significance of all statistical analysis.

For "actual outcome" proponents, conclusions regarding SD with a firearm (Should I CC? Should I CC 24/7? Should I CC in C1?) are made using a different decision model than many other important questions; the difference is that probability is ignored.

We consider lots of life/death matters each day on the basis of probability. Sometimes its a conscious process and sometimes its a casual, subconscious decision. Often the go-ahead decision involves much more risk than the threat of violent attack. Consider the following:

We allow our teenage kids to drive, unsupervised, before their skill and maturity warrant doing so.
We allow our kids to ride a bus to school without seat belts.
We ride a motorcycle, sometimes with a loved one on the back.
We operate a car or truck on busy streets and highways.
We climb stepladders and work at dangerous heights on our homes.
We participate in risky recreational activities (amusement parks, power boats for skiing and tubing, white water rafting, build a swimming pool in our back yard).

We accept the risks of these activities knowing that the outcome could be tragic, deadly. Why do we proceed as though they are 'routine' with little or no analysis, no special training, no purchase of specialized equipment, no forum participation to discuss/debate the dangers and ways to avert them? Somehow, the probability of a terrible outcome is acceptable. I just don't get it.

Why do we look at the risk of criminal attack through a different lens than the risk of a school bus accident? I'm not arguing against CC or C1, but I am asking why we approach criminal attack one way (train, practice, participate in GT, and invest in equipment against a possible outcome regardless of probability) and common daily activities (proceed because probability is acceptable) in a totally different way.

I think this subject is germane to the C1 vs. C3 discussion. The decision to carry C1 reflects maximum preparedness (the fastest most efficient mode) to defend against an attack, the very low probably of which is ignored. Opting to use C1 introduces additional risk to the CC proposition, and the probability of an ND is ignored. We simply ignore reality (probability) because, it seems, ...we want to!
These are great points! Let me try to get a crack at addressing them.

Personally, I feel that owning/carrying a gun makes some of us more paranoid.

This has to do with what psychologists call "schema activation." In our long-term memory we store vast amount of information (e.g., cognitions, memories, attitudes, beliefs), all of which are related/connected to one another to smaller or larger extent. For example, all memories/cognitions about politics are relatively strongly connected. So, when you read news about Obama, it activates (brings into working memory or makes temporarily more important for you) all politics-related cognitions, like "government", "liberal", "gun control", etc. Another example is when you encounter something negative in your environment (e.g., your boss tells you he is dissatisfied with your performance), this activates "negative" cognitions in your memory, like "my job sucks", "i am unhappy", "i make little money", "my wife treats me badly", "my kids don't think I'm cool", etc.

When we interact with our guns (training, reading books about guns/tactics, or actually carrying guns, etc.), this activates the cognitions related to safety and security. Psychologists found that repeatedly activating some cognitions makes these cognitions chronically accessible and salient (in other words, they are always on the top of our minds and they strongly influence our thoughts/behaviors). So... when you own a gun, or regularly train with your gun, or regularly carry your gun, these acts make you worry more about your safety!! This is a bit paradoxical, because owning/carrying a gun should reduce your concerns about safety. But, psychological theory suggests that the opposite might be taking place to some extent.

Another psychological theory is "cognitive dissonance." Basically, it says that when we performed some action, we want to feel good about ourselves after having engaged in this action. If we don't feel good about ourselves having engaged in this action, we experience cognitive dissonance. Example: If you think of yourself as generally a good person, when you do something bad (tell a lie, do something that makes you feel guilty), you experience cognitive dissonance. So, when we buy guns/start carrying guns, we have a strong psychological need to justify these behaviors. If many of us purchased guns because we just like guns, like shooting, or something bad happened to us in the distant past, or because we have seen some horrible mass shooting news story on TV, after we have purchased the gun we have to come up with reasons for owning/carrying guns. And these reasons don't necessarily have to be very logical/rational (psychologists found that after buying a car, people like to read car reviews, BUT, interestingly, they prefer to read the reviews that portray their car is an excellent choice and avoid reviews that portray their car as a poor choice). So, we basically justify owning/carrying guns by focusing on low-probability but high-severity events, like being mugged, robbed, attacked, killed. Thinking about how horrible these events are helps us reduce dissonance. Think about how unlikely these events are increases dissonance. So, we are psychologically predisposed to focus more on how horrible these events are, and predisposed to avoid thinking about how unlikely these events are. This obviously does not describe situation of military, leos, or people living/working in ghettos where these horrible events have high probability.

Keep in mind 3 things: (1) Not all people experience the same psychological processes. We are all unique (some people don't experience much cognitive dissonance at all, regardless of what the do). But, theories like the ones described above describe "general" behavior of "average" individual (they describe behaviors of majority of people under majority of circumstances). They might apply to you to larger or smaller extent. (2) All of the above is my own analysis - I have not done a formal empirical study testing all the propositions made above. These propositions are just derived from my experience with guns and from my knowledge of psych research. (3) I'm sleep-deprived as I'm typing this, so I apologize for any lack of clarity.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:53   #797
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These are great points! Let me try to get a crack at addressing them.

Personally, I feel that owning/carrying a gun makes some of us more paranoid.

This has to do with what psychologists call "schema activation." In our long-term memory we store vast amount of information (e.g., cognitions, memories, attitudes, beliefs), all of which are related/connected to one 1another to smaller or larger extent. For example, all memories/cognitions about politics are relatively strongly connected. So, when you read news about Obama, it activates (brings into working memory or makes temporarily more important for you) all politics-related cognitions, like "government", "liberal", "gun control", etc. Another example is when you encounter something negative in your environment (e.g., your boss tells you he is dissatisfied with your performance), this activates "negative" cognitions in your memory, like "my job sucks", "i am unhappy", "i make little money", "my wife treats me badly", "my kids don't think I'm cool", etc.

When we interact with our guns (training, reading books about guns/tactics, or actually carrying guns, etc.), this activates the cognitions related to safety and security. Psychologists found that repeatedly activating some cognitions makes these cognitions chronically accessible and salient (in other words, they are always on the top of our minds and they strongly influence our thoughts/behaviors). So... when you own a gun, or regularly train with your gun, or regularly carry your gun, these acts make you worry more about your safety!! This is a bit paradoxical, because owning/carrying a gun should reduce your concerns about safety. But, psychological theory suggests that the opposite might be taking place to some extent.

Another psychological theory is "cognitive dissonance." Basically, it says that when we performed some action, we want to feel good about ourselves after having engaged in this action. If we don't feel good about ourselves having engaged in this action, we experience cognitive dissonance. Example: If you think of yourself as generally a good person, when you do something bad (tell a lie, do something that makes you feel guilty), you experience cognitive dissonance. So, when we buy guns/start carrying guns, we have a strong psychological need to justify these behaviors. If many of us purchased guns because we just like guns, like shooting, or something bad happened to us in the distant past, or because we have seen some horrible mass shooting news story on TV, after we have purchased the gun we have to come up with reasons for owning/carrying guns. And these reasons don't necessarily have to be very logical/rational (psychologists found that after buying a car, people like to read car reviews, BUT, interestingly, they prefer to read the reviews that portray their car is an excellent choice and avoid reviews that portray their car as a poor choice). So, we basically justify owning/carrying guns by focusing on low-probability but high-severity events, like being mugged, robbed, attacked, killed. Thinking about how horrible these events are helps us reduce dissonance. Think about how unlikely these events are increases dissonance. So, we are psychologically predisposed to focus more on how horrible these events are, and predisposed to avoid thinking about how unlikely these events are. This obviously does not describe situation of military, leos, or people living/working in ghettos where these horrible events have high probability.

Keep in mind 3 things: (1) Not all people experience the same psychological processes. We are all unique (some people don't experience much cognitive dissonance at all). But, theories like the ones described above describe "general" behavior of "average" individual (they describe behaviors of majority of people under majority of circumstances). They might apply to you to larger or smaller extent. (2) All of the above is my own analysis - I have not done a formal empirical study testing all the propositions made above. These propositions are just derived from my experience with guns and from my knowledge of psych research. (3) I'm sleep-deprived as I'm typing this, so I apologize for any lack of clarity.
I'm impressed! Think how profound you might be if you were wide awake!

I didn't have a pre-conceived answer of such depth, but your response has a solid technical 'ring' to it. It requires a bit more study.

I have often thought that people who are fascinated with firearms and enjoy owning them, as I do, gravitate to CC because it justifies everyday handling of guns, buying guns, ammo and lots of accessories, professional training, range fees and spending lots of time hanging out at places like gun stores and GT.

I think CC also brings a sense of empowerment, coolness and upward movement in the male hierarchy (shepard vs. sheeple). Women more easily justify CC and C1 because they are more vulnerable.

For some, advancement to C1 with a Glock represents the ultimate empowerment because it announces "Now I'm really ready for combat" even though the likelihood of a surprise attack is south of some extremely low probability. In my county of residence, the most recent 10 year population and murder statistics (all murders, not surprise attacks by strangers) produce a probability of being murdered of .003%; this assumes the county-wide risk is uniform, which it is not.

Now I've got to see how my simplistic answer squares with your technical propositions. I'm probably trying to avoid cognitive dissonance, but maybe not. My thoughts certainly don't apply to people who have carried for many years, LEOs past and present, anyone who has experienced an attack or those whose environment really does pose meaningful risk. Maybe my opinion is merely a reflection of my own motivations for CC, whatever they are.

This post will stir some ill will, I'm sure, but sayin' what's on our mind is part of the contract. Furthermore, the motivations for CC and carry mode selection are as personal as choosing a bride; its strictly up to the dude making the commitment.

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-15-2013 at 16:57..
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Old 03-15-2013, 18:37   #798
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All I can say is, look around you, check out CNN, read the paper, watch the news. We live in a hostile world now. Yes there are still good ole boys and girls out there with good old fashion morals and standards. But the fact remains, we live in a hostile and unpredictable world, where recidivism abounds.

For the love of God, Country and your Family, learn to use your firearm properly and efficiently, and if you carry, do so in C1. Don't Be A Victim, Be Prepared.

Sorry, I'm just a firm believer in not getting caught with my pants down, under any circumstances. You don't need to be paranoid, just be ready to protect LIFE, be it yours or a loved one, or even a perfect stranger.

Whether it's my Glock, Sig, or 1911, it's C1 at all times
PERIOD.

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Old 03-15-2013, 18:51   #799
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Originally Posted by dwbG30SF View Post
All I can say is, look around you, check out CNN, read the paper, watch the news. We live in a hostile world now. Yes there are still good ole boys and girls out there with good old fashion morals and standards. But the fact remains, we live in a hostile and unpredictable world, where recidivism and abounds.

For the love of God, Country and your Family, learn to use your firearm properly and efficiently, and if you carry, do so in C1. Don't Be A Victim, Be Prepared.

Sorry, I'm just a firm believer in not getting caught with my pants down, under any circumstances. You don't need to be paranoid, just be ready to protect LIFE, be it yours or a loved one, or even a perfect stranger.

Whether it's my Glock, Sig, or 1911, it's C1 at all times
PERIOD.
Your sincerity is apparent, and I'm not pokin' at you or anyone else.

I'm just trying to figure out our penchant for C1 with a Glock despite minimal risk of attack while we blithely accept other, more dangerous threats with little or no special effort to avert the danger.

I posted the murder facts in my area, 'cause thats where I live. CNN reports mean little in my environment. I feel the freedom to behave without fear of something very, very, very unlikely to happen. On the other hand, I am truly concerned about getting hit by some fool texting in moving traffic; so, I drive more defensively than ever before. I've stopped climbing to heights on ladders with my bad knees because there are so many serious brain and spinal cord injuries due to falls from them. I won't tow my granddaughters on a tube behind my boat because of the danger from drunk, careless boat operators. That's reality to me.

You'll be safe and responsible. Most others will, too. Have a great, safe weekend.

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-15-2013 at 19:32..
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Old 03-15-2013, 19:45   #800
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I respect what you said PhotoFeller, and it makes perfect sense. All I'm saying is "I refuse to be a victim", and will not let my guard down.

Frankly, I just don't understand why anyone would even bother carrying a CCW if it's not "ready" to protect.

But hey, that's just me. And I sleep just fine at night.

Have a great weekend everyone.
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Nov 11, 2013 at 11:42