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Old 09-16-2012, 07:42   #1
emt1581
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Tent's place in preps?

I was checking out the ammo supply at Wal-Mart the other day, which was dwindling worse than it did in 2008, but I looked over and saw their selection of tents.

They had this "Junior" pup tent for 20 bucks. But they also had nice Coleman 4-8 man tents for around 50 bucks.

They did not look too bulky either.

I gave my NIB tent away years ago to my cousin. It made me think of picking another one up to use for my son and I to go camping and such.

But I'm curious, does anyone have a tent figured in to their preps at all?

I know I've seen lots and lots of tarps... but not a whole lot of tents.

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks

-Emt1581
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:47   #2
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I have a sturdy, 'waterproof,' two-man tent that weighs 3.5 lbs and needs no tent poles.

It's packed in my backpack, and in a SHTF situation, will go with me.

I believe that shelter is the #1 concern in a survival situation, and if I can carry a tent with me, I don't have to worry much about expending the energy needed to build an ad hoc shelter out of available materials.
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:59   #3
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I have a sturdy, 'waterproof,' two-man tent that weighs 3.5 lbs and needs no tent poles.

It's packed in my backpack, and in a SHTF situation, will go with me.

I believe that shelter is the #1 concern in a survival situation, and if I can carry a tent with me, I don't have to worry much about expending the energy needed to build an ad hoc shelter out of available materials.
In the past, two man would have been just fine and I've seen some two man tents that I could even throw in my GHB if needed. But now that we have our son everything from food/water, shelter, etc...needs to be family based. All that means is I'd need a slightly bigger model.

Did brand matter to you?

I know all through the scouts we used colemans without any issues. Plus if one of the pegs broke or got lossed you just just snap/knotch a branch and make one.

Thanks

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Old 09-16-2012, 08:10   #4
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Originally Posted by emt1581 View Post
In the past, two man would have been just fine and I've seen some two man tents that I could even throw in my GHB if needed. But now that we have our son everything from food/water, shelter, etc...needs to be family based. All that means is I'd need a slightly bigger model.

Did brand matter to you?

I know all through the scouts we used colemans without any issues. Plus if one of the pegs broke or got lossed you just just snap/knotch a branch and make one.

Thanks

-Emt1581
With a family, you have 'pack animals', i.e. kids.

One of them can carry a pretty good sized tent.

As for brand, I think that with tents, you get what you pay for, particularly in the area of weight. A good canvas tent is cheap, and durable, but weighs a lot. A cheap nylon tent weighs less, but may not hold up.

You might look at what REI has to offer. They carry a wide variety of tents in a wide range of prices, and their REI brand seems to get favorable reviews.
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Old 09-16-2012, 08:22   #5
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With a family, you have 'pack animals', i.e. kids.

One of them can carry a pretty good sized tent.
Ha! This is true!

I thought about that for my dog, a 90lb. GSD, in the past but I never got around to buying him a vest w/ pouches. He could certainly carry 20-30lbs of gear...or at least could have before we found out he had hip dysplasia.

But back to the kid...I think the more he knows the more useful he is. It'd be nice, at an earlier age, for him to not only carry it but know how to set it up.

I feel that way about most of my preps. But since he just learned to walk two months ago...we don't want to jump the gun too much.

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Old 09-16-2012, 09:11   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emt1581 View Post
I was checking out the ammo supply at Wal-Mart the other day, which was dwindling worse than it did in 2008, but I looked over and saw their selection of tents.

They had this "Junior" pup tent for 20 bucks. But they also had nice Coleman 4-8 man tents for around 50 bucks.

They did not look too bulky either.

I gave my NIB tent away years ago to my cousin. It made me think of picking another one up to use for my son and I to go camping and such.

But I'm curious, does anyone have a tent figured in to their preps at all?

I know I've seen lots and lots of tarps... but not a whole lot of tents.

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks

-Emt1581
I've got a large, 8 person tent with a waterproof cover. Its pretty awesome. Doesn't weigh all that much, in the event of bugging out I'd be in my car anyways. As with most of my 'preps', its not really a prep, its just something I have because I use it in my life and it would be great if I had to bug out.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:03   #7
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i carry a small 1 person tent with my bigger bag and use it on overnight solo hikes. in my edc bag, its mostly poncho as i dont plan on sheltering in place unless absolutely necessary, but thats a ghb role.
back on topic, i think a tent is good if you have the room. makes things easier initially but dont overlook options if it gets damaged. i also believe that you get what you pay for to a point. the walmart cheapies get used by boy scouts because they are cheap and disposable to an extent. just like any other prep, have to set your needs and buy accordingly, not solely on price. but then the same holds true that anything is better than nothing, usually.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:37   #8
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I have a single person 4 season tent that goes in my survival ruck at work. A 6 person general use 3 season canvas tent, and a 4 person, any weather, any season tent that is capable of survival down to close to 100 below. I've had it up to 115, with the outside air temp at -30.


Different tents for different purposes.


Tents can be exceedingly useful, if you've got the right gear for the job.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:57   #9
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Single person tents? Do they look like normal tents just smaller or are those the kind that look like an overgrown sleeping bag?

As far as the temperature, that is good to consider.

I've seen some at Cabelas that can handle their own wood stove and have vestibules, 3 car garages, wine cellars, etc.... while they look VERY sturdy and VERY bulky. So I do see the trade-off

What'd be nice is something compact and somewhat lightweight but that can also handle water, wind, and all types of temperatures.

Again, aside from the gear I'll be wearing (weapons/vests/belts/clothing), everything from here on out needs to be family-sized. So at least a 4-person space in this case.

Thanks

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Old 09-16-2012, 13:19   #10
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Aside from the canvas tents at Cabelas, the Alaknak series, won't be useful in anything under about 40 degrees.


They're base camp tents, for outfitters. If thats your purpose, they're great tents. But for just about anything else, they're sub-par.



As for single person tents, there are two styles. Bivvy's which are the waterproof sleeping bag covers, and single person tents that are infact, single person tents.

I use this for my work tent http://store.eurekatent.com/solitaire-tent
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Old 09-16-2012, 13:25   #11
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Aside from the canvas tents at Cabelas, the Alaknak series, won't be useful in anything under about 40 degrees.


They're base camp tents, for outfitters. If thats your purpose, they're great tents. But for just about anything else, they're sub-par.



As for single person tents, there are two styles. Bivvy's which are the waterproof sleeping bag covers, and single person tents that are infact, single person tents.

I use this for my work tent http://store.eurekatent.com/solitaire-tent
That's pretty neat! I've never seen one like that.

Now is canvas the only way to go for freezing temps and just about blizzard conditions?

I know the wood-decked/steel framed canvas tents at some of the camps I've been so seem really rugged...you just need a truck to haul them around.

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Old 09-16-2012, 13:34   #12
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It all depends on what you want, what kind of gear you have and what kind of conditions you are seeing.


The nice thing about canvas, is they're big, heavy duty, and with a wood stove, very warm. There's a reason that old timers used to build their cabin around the canvas tent, then take it down once the cabin was finished.

The down side is they're heavy, bulky, and require specific care, because of the canvas.

Modern tents, using plastics, are waterproof, and light. The downside being they don't stand up to high winds as well, and they are typicaly colder, as they're not designed for a stove. And, unless you buy a really, really nice one, aren't made for long term occupation.


There are some "hybrid" tents, like mine, but they're generally specific use tents, and cost quite a bit. But you get the best of both worlds. Lightweight (comparitively) sturdy, and very warm.
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Old 09-16-2012, 15:14   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emt1581 View Post
Single person tents? Do they look like normal tents just smaller or are those the kind that look like an overgrown sleeping bag?

As far as the temperature, that is good to consider.

I've seen some at Cabelas that can handle their own wood stove and have vestibules, 3 car garages, wine cellars, etc.... while they look VERY sturdy and VERY bulky. So I do see the trade-off

What'd be nice is something compact and somewhat lightweight but that can also handle water, wind, and all types of temperatures.

Again, aside from the gear I'll be wearing (weapons/vests/belts/clothing), everything from here on out needs to be family-sized. So at least a 4-person space in this case.

Thanks

-Emt1581
Avoid the tents with wood stoves, central heat is better, and no wine sellers, wine just clouds you senses. Vestibules and garages are OK.

If it is a wife and yourself and a toddler, a 4 man is good, because you can Bring non-food items inside out of the rain. If you follow the ratings 3 man means 3 men can sleep in it. I think it means they sleep in 3 shifts. Either that or they are petite and very friendly men. If it is going to be cold, going too big will make you colder.

It is all about are you packing it in or are you car camping/bugging out. Your wife and kids will likely be happier with a tent that keeps bugs out, than under a tarp.
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Old 09-16-2012, 15:16   #14
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Yes. I have an 8-person tent and smaller pop tent. The main reason is...camping. However my camping supplies are integral with my S&P supplies. A reason for the tent would be to provide a place to sleep along the way to our BOL. It would not be meant to serve as some type of long-term survival quarters.
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Old 09-16-2012, 22:59   #15
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i have both a 1 man tent and a bivy bag. the bivy bag goes everywhere and the 1 man tent is usually for extended trips or colder weather.

we are looking at some heavier, bigger tents right now but mostly because my wife wants to take the german shepherds out with us on an overnight camping trip. i think thats more because shes afraid of people in the wild more than wanting the dogs "to have a good time" as she says
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Old 09-17-2012, 09:24   #16
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You will never be homeless if you have a tent.

I have a crapload of tents, Hammocks, and tarp shelters. At the end of the day I think a lightweight tent is awesome if you need to Bug Out and carry everything on your back. A decent tent can be a 4 season shelter.

If you were in walmart, Coleman makes a gray 2 man backpacking tent, that as long as your not over 6' tall that rocks for the price.

If you have a family, its also a smart idea to get a large tent if there is a sale. I got a Colemen 6 man tent off season for $45, and its the best money I ever spent. We have taken it car camping and the kids have had outdoor sleepovers in the backyardin it a few time. More importantly, if the SHTF and you have a family of four , a 6 man tent is a mobile shelter that can fit in the trunk of any car or truck, and can be carried if need be.

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Old 09-17-2012, 09:38   #17
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I keep a couple of Eureka tents, a very small freestanding 2 person and an ancient 1970's vintage larger 3 person which needs to be staked.

I usually take one if camping among vehicles or canoes, but I still end up sleeping outside if possible, harder for axe murderers to find me inna woods.

If I need privacy, or security from insects or shelter from rain, it's already pitched and ready a few yards away.

And sleeping ouside is a valuable survival skill for bugging out or backpacking.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:24   #18
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Shelter is ALWAYS considered no matter what the trip involves, so my pack always has something. It is always one of the following:

- hammock and tarp
- bivy plus tarp
- tent
- tarp.

I really like the hammock and tarp during warm weather because it helps me stay cool at night. While asleep, I like being away from most things that crawl around on the ground.

I use a tarp with a bivy because I don't want to get wet climbing in and out of the bivy. In the rain, I sleep better with the raindrops hitting the tarp than with them hitting the bivy fabric inches from my face. I can also open the bivy for better ventilation.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:53   #19
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Shelter is ALWAYS considered no matter what the trip involves, so my pack always has something. It is always one of the following:

- hammock and tarp
- bivy plus tarp
- tent
- tarp.

I really like the hammock and tarp during warm weather because it helps me stay cool at night. While asleep, I like being away from most things that crawl around on the ground.

I use a tarp with a bivy because I don't want to get wet climbing in and out of the bivy. In the rain, I sleep better with the raindrops hitting the tarp than with them hitting the bivy fabric inches from my face. I can also open the bivy for better ventilation.
+1

I have a Hennesy and an ENO hammock shelters and they are awesome for hot weather camping. Personally I like sleeping in the hammock since I sleep like a baby in them and I don't wake up sore. The pack pretty small and are lightweight. You also have a great field of view, and you always have a place to sit and lay that is off the ground. The PITA thing about the hammock shelters is the lack of insulation underneath, so that your back and butt gets cold in cooler weather. There are pads and underquilts to prevent that, but then you add more weight and bulk and you approach something as big and as heavy as a tent. The other more obvious problem is if you have no trees to hang your hammock on.

I have 2 bivvys and tarp system, but for me they are more of a SHTF, you wanted by the alien overlords/enemy troops, and you need to disappear. With a camo or earthtone bivvy and low pitched tarp you can almost disapper in the wood. The problem is, its not real comfortable and its hard to avoid getting wet and muddy.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:57   #20
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A tent is portable shelter, and shelter is very high on the list of things you need. Period.

We have camped and backpacked all over the world, an tested/used/observed lots of tents over the years. We have two, both the same. Eureka 4 man Timberline Outfitter. We have the vestbule, and always use a ground cloth.

I will admit those are now 3rd string.. maybe 4th, as we have a couple travel trailers now, and my first plan is to roll one of those. But one in the truck always, one in the home go bags.
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