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Old 02-17-2014, 07:24   #41
Deputydave
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I'll second what Aceman stated. We used the bike & trailer back in December at the second SEP gathering. I made a few mistakes; first the trailer was a bit overloaded. Second, the trailer tires weren't properly inflated. And lastly, the angle in which it was attached to the bike was wrong.

All self-correcting errors as that thing shooting out my left ear was my spleen on the way out to the remote site. I unloaded some unnecessary weight, pumped up the tires and adjusted the angle. On the way back it was a LOT easier riding.

Having said all that, like Aceman, my first choice when biking would be sans trailer and just the pack on my back and whatever I fit on the rack on the back of the bike.

But yes, imo the bike (and/or trailer) is a good prep idea. It is situational. Some scenarios it could be a blessing and in some it could be a bad idea. But better to have (and be proficient with) and not need it than to need it and you're stuck with the shoe leather express.
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Old 02-17-2014, 08:42   #42
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A while back I found a trail-a-bike at a garage sale inexpensively and rigged it into a cargo hauler.

This is the mark 1 version;
Survival/Preparedness Forum

It works very well and is capable of hauling a lot of weight. I (over 200 pounds) have even been pulled in it. My main use for it was hauling water up to our camping spot but have since found it useful for packing tools and even game quarters.

I'm currently testing a Mark 2 version.

A bike is a valuable asset. Those that have traveled in 3rd world countries can attest to its value and usefulness to those unable to afford cars or in areas where roads are so bad cars really aren't practical.
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Old 02-17-2014, 08:47   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet Dog View Post
A while back I found a trail-a-bike at a garage sale inexpensively and rigged it into a cargo hauler.

This is the mark 1 version;
Survival/Preparedness Forum

It works very well and is capable of hauling a lot of weight. I (over 200 pounds) have even been pulled in it. My main use for it was hauling water up to our camping spot but have since found it useful for packing tools and even game quarters.

I'm currently testing a Mark 2 version.

A bike is a valuable asset. Those that have traveled in 3rd world countries can attest to its value and usefulness to those unable to afford cars or in areas where roads are so bad cars really aren't practical.
Love that. Way to improvise/adapt.
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Old 02-17-2014, 12:27   #44
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best way to get into shape for a bike ride with extra weight, ride the hell out of the bike...Ive done a few rails to trails trips with 30lbs of extra gear on my bike on soft gravel and I found the best way to increase endurance was just put in the miles, I tried incorporating more weight lifting with my legs and that really didn't seem to do much for riding endurance.
I found weight lifting should allow me to ride in a higher gear.

But if you want to go long range, you need to ride long range.
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Old 02-17-2014, 12:32   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet Dog View Post
A while back I found a trail-a-bike at a garage sale inexpensively and rigged it into a cargo hauler.

This is the mark 1 version;
Survival/Preparedness Forum

It works very well and is capable of hauling a lot of weight. I (over 200 pounds) have even been pulled in it. My main use for it was hauling water up to our camping spot but have since found it useful for packing tools and even game quarters.

I'm currently testing a Mark 2 version.

A bike is a valuable asset. Those that have traveled in 3rd world countries can attest to its value and usefulness to those unable to afford cars or in areas where roads are so bad cars really aren't practical.
That wood look heavy.

If I had that, and I could weld....I am thinking some aluminum tubing would be good in making a rack. I would do it so it works with standard bags AND some attachment points for non-bicycle bags.

IF you could go wide..a fold down flat to put rubber made tubs on.
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Old 02-17-2014, 12:50   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWBlue View Post
That wood look heavy.

If I had that, and I could weld....I am thinking some aluminum tubing would be good in making a rack. I would do it so it works with standard bags AND some attachment points for non-bicycle bags.

IF you could go wide..a fold down flat to put rubber made tubs on.

Surly Bicycles figured this all out with the Big Dummy that was launched in 2008. I built one of the first, and sold it, but now I miss that hard-working monster and want to build another.

Do a Google search for "Surly Big Dummy" and you'll see that this platform is not a fly-by-night fad. People dig the functionality, to the point where they use it to haul their kids, move furniture, etc. Add "The Goat" to that same Google search and you'll find pictures of my build.
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Old 02-17-2014, 13:02   #47
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Originally Posted by g27_mengi View Post
Surly Bicycles figured this all out with the Big Dummy that was launched in 2008. I built one of the first, and sold it, but now I miss that hard-working monster and want to build another.

Do a Google search for "Surly Big Dummy" and you'll see that this platform is not a fly-by-night fad. People dig the functionality, to the point where they use it to haul their kids, move furniture, etc. Add "The Goat" to that same Google search and you'll find pictures of my build.
Yep, seen those.

Right now, I could do a hotel trip with just the bags on the bike OR I can take all the camping gear I need on a trailer.

I could hall wood or other stuff on the trailer, BUT...the heavier the load, the harder it is to go...
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Old 02-17-2014, 13:11   #48
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Yep, seen those.

Right now, I could do a hotel trip with just the bags on the bike OR I can take all the camping gear I need on a trailer.
Ha! So true!

Hey, I didn't say it was cheap.

Part of the reason I sold the Goat was due to it's overall bulk. Granted, it was a remarkably able bicycle, and guys have raced these, but you won't find a committed Big Dummy race scene happening. If you do, I'll argue that those cats have way too much free time.

Anyway, I came back to a normal wheelbase for it's more nimble nature, and its ability to blend in. The Big Dummy is a head snapper on the street. In a serious situation, I'd rather hide smaller chunks of critically needed things in common bags on a common bike, than parade my stuff on a odd magnet like the Dummy.

And if it's really serious, trying to move anything of perceived value—even simple, unmarked panniers—out in the open is gonna be tough.

FWIW, my latest set of bike panniers include one bag with a backpack option, in case I have to grab one bag off the bike and run.
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Old 02-17-2014, 13:16   #49
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I used to bike tour when I was younger. I had panniers etc. to totally load my bike. For SHTF purposes though, I think a basic rack and a handlebar bag would be good.

Easy to load up that wagon with wayyyy more than you really want to haul.
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Old 02-17-2014, 14:09   #50
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Originally Posted by g27_mengi View Post
Part of the reason I sold the Goat was due to it's overall bulk. Granted, it was a remarkably able bicycle, and guys have raced these, but you won't find a committed Big Dummy race scene happening. If you do, I'll argue that those cats have way too much free time.
Let start off with I am old and slow, but.....

For those young and in shape...I always thought a rally race style would be interesting. People pack up all their crap, have start times, have finish times, and do long distance tour racing.

For extra excitement, you can add some of us old slow people to the path and camp.
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Old 02-17-2014, 14:47   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWBlue View Post
Let start off with I am old and slow, but.....

For those young and in shape...I always thought a rally race style would be interesting. People pack up all their crap, have start times, have finish times, and do long distance tour racing.

For extra excitement, you can add some of us old slow people to the path and camp.
I like it. And while I may not be in the same old/slow category, I'm old enough to prefer slower company. We can enjoy the ride while the two-wheel "Death Race 2000" blazes past. Besides, too fast and we'll spill our popcorn.
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Old 02-17-2014, 15:08   #52
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You are almost describing Randonneuring. It's basically touring with a time limit. There are Bicycle and Equipment requirements too.

If you manage to make it through the qualifying 'Brevets' you can enter and ride the pinnacle of the sports Brevets; Paris-Brest-Paris, 1200 kilometers in 90 hours.

Last edited by Wet Dog; 02-17-2014 at 15:47..
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Old 02-17-2014, 15:46   #53
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I did a little touring last year on a converted mountain bike. Covering 60-80 miles in a day and being fully self contained (camping) wasn't that difficult. I have a water filter but didn't need to use it. I was able to average about 12 mph in hilly terrain.

Survival/Preparedness Forum

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Old 02-17-2014, 21:27   #54
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12-15 mph loaded was about right. 20-25 on a road bike clean.

But a day could easily move you ~90 miles. 30/45 before lunch, 30 after, and 10-30 before dark.

Again, lighter is better, fit is better, water is key; But that's any prepping!
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Old 02-17-2014, 22:29   #55
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Not an expert by any means so far as Bug out options, but WRT to carrying crap on a bike in a wide range of conditions, I find it easiest to carry as much on your person as possible vs using a trailer or loading the bike.
I ride a bunch, used to race XC in the 90s and have tried panniers/low riders and HB packs (heavy touring) and that's about the most I'd ever want to tote in any real riding situation, esp if mixing dirt into the picture. The more weight you can bear in a pack or mess bag, the more able to handle mixed terrain you'll be.
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