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Old 03-16-2013, 21:10   #26
WinterWizard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiro Fijo View Post
Simple reason as I stated earlier: cost.
You may be right, but I am not convinced that is the sole reason.
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Old 03-16-2013, 23:19   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiro Fijo View Post
3.3" barrel. Weight ≠ mass. Solid copper bullets have more mass.
Uhh, mass vs weight 185gr is 185gr. The length of the bullet has little to do with momentum. A longer for wt monometal bullet will give you slightly higher SD as it expands because it rarely loses wt & also rarely over expands. IMO, not offering much over a well designed bonded lead core bullet. They are also brutally expensive.
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Old 03-17-2013, 02:04   #28
Tiro Fijo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fredj338 View Post
...IMO, not offering much over a well designed bonded lead core bullet...

Until one has to shoot through steel (car/truck doors), then it beats the bonded handgun bullet. Granted, for the average layman this is of little consequence, (as well bonded bullets) but for LE it's a trump card.

Does it warrant the cost? In some scenarios where one needs the absolute maximum potential in a handgun round involving hard barriers, e.g., Highway Patrolmen. Other than that, economy wins as it is as you said, "brutally expensive".
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Old 03-17-2013, 07:56   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChallengerSRT View Post
I've no clue what are you talking about regarding, "solid copper bullets have more mass." If you put two equal size bullets side by side, one made of solid copper, and one of lead, the density of the lead bullet should be 3.26 times that of the copper one based upon their molecular weights. That increase in weight should pack much more punch if traveling at the same velicity.
Now, if you're talking about the HARDNESS of each metal, there should be a marked difference in penetration of one metal vs. the other due to the lead being so much softer. It will deform much faster with energy lost in doing so, plus more resistance due to increase in diameter.
Your statement of Solid copper bullets having more mass makes absolutely no sense to me.
+1. He's spewing nonsense again.

"solid copper bullets have more mass."
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:34   #30
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Originally Posted by digilo View Post
+1. He's spewing nonsense again.

"solid copper bullets have more mass."
Sort of. If mass as a unit of weight, they have the same weight. If total projectile size not counting weight, the copper bullt is longer. So it depends on how you are defining mass. A pound of feathers or a pound of lead, which has more mass? Bulk or mass, is it semantics? To me mass means weight, not bulk, pound of feathers or pound of lead?
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:50   #31
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No definition of mass I've ever seen or have been taught in school implies weight. Mass refers the the size of something, or the area it takes up. I don't think weight has anything to do with it.
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Old 03-17-2013, 12:47   #32
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Here is a link to an accounting of a real world shooting with DPX. The light stuff did just fine here.

http://www.xdtalk.com/forums/ammo-ca...-shooting.html
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Old 03-17-2013, 13:26   #33
Tiro Fijo
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Originally Posted by WinterWizard View Post
No definition of mass I've ever seen or have been taught in school implies weight. Mass refers the the size of something, or the area it takes up. I don't think weight has anything to do with it.

Bingo again.


For the others who shot pool during science class, get educated:

Mass is a measure of how much matter something contains.

Weight is a measure of how strongly gravity pulls downwards.

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Old 03-17-2013, 15:44   #34
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I guess I'm missing the point of this thread completely. I am well aware of what all of the definitions involved here mean. What I stated was that two bullets the same size or MASS put side by side, one solid copper, the other solid lead, will have a drastic difference in density (weight/unit volume). Take that difference in density, propel it at the same speed down range, and I'd expect the much heavier round to pack more punch.
If both bullets are the same grain, then I agree, the copper one would have to be considerably longer. What effect that has on anything, I've no clue. For the difference in cost, however, I'd rather pump a few rounds of lead towards the target for the price of one copper round. If the sky's the limit for cost, I'd go with titanium.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=lLX33bAVXuU
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Old 03-17-2013, 22:24   #35
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I agree. This thread has gotten a little dumb at this point. But hey, it's the Caliber Corner. Threads always get dumb. Which is why I read them often.
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Old 03-18-2013, 03:00   #36
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45 = 230 grain and nothing else.


Lighter bullets are for smaller calibers. Putting a lighter bullet in your .45 is like buying a Mustang with a V6.
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Old 03-18-2013, 17:10   #37
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I wonder how much penetration these bullets get?
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