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Old 01-24-2013, 21:18   #21
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:18   #22
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I never had and never will have round in the chamber - instead I practice racking the slide when dryfiring. Racking slide instinctively becomes as quick/smooth as drawing from the holster. The time it takes me to take the gun out, rack the slide, and place sights on target is minimal since the gun follows the same trajectory out of the holster and on target without slowing down. Racking the slide takes place while the gun is moving to the target.

My rationale - I want to guarantee no AD due to operator error and I don't want to shoot myself in the hip when the adrenaline dump begins and your fine motor reflexes go out the window making you likely to accidentally place finger on the trigger and squeeze the trigger without realizing you are doing this. Some might argue: Practice keeping the f@$#&ng finger off the trigger. And, I do. But, I want an extra precaution for the flight/fight episodes.

If not cambering round works for Israeli military - a superb force operating in some of the most challenging/dangerous environments - it is good enough for me.

But you need to practice (and practice, and practice) racking the slide. As a very useful bonus, being able to quickly rack the slide makes you faster when clearing malfunctions.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:18   #23
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A neighbor girl has a permit to carry (she got hers with my family a while ago) and told me she was very uncomfortable about carrying a loaded gun (she has a S&W 642 .38 Special) She said she was fearful that since she wasn't used to carrying the gun, she worried she might do something to cause it to fire unintentionally. She has served a hitch in the Air Force so she is hardly timid.

She works in health care and goes to some seedy areas of town and has many shifts during the dark hours. I worry about her unarmed. She is our "fourth daughter, but by another mother". I suggested she make a special effort to carry her pistol unloaded, all the time she is home, everyday, in a proper holster, until she feels comfortable with it, her trigger discipline and handling of it. When she is comfortable that it is becoming second nature to deal with it properly and safely, she can then do the same with it now loaded.

She also asked to come with me to the range often, to gain more confidence in her ability with it. This is a great excuse for me to go shoot also. I love to go shooting. My wife, not so much.

When she believes it is safe for her to carry a loaded pistol all the time, carry it outside every waking moment from then on. You will get so that it is a physical constant, an extension of your body, and you will feel it is no hindrance at all in daily functions, but you always know it is there when needed.

If you live with your firearm, you must respect it, and the responsibility that goes along with it. Then you will not worry about unintended consequences.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:21   #24
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I carry one in the chamber. Period. But, if you are uneasy, a great way to start, is with a full mag/no chambered but cocked. Do this for as long as it takes to get comfortable with your gun and holster. After a while, you will find the trigger doesn't magically go off. Then, once you are comfortable, put one in the pipe.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:24   #25
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OR ............ Carry the gun without chambering a round but cocked. After you get comfortable that the weapon won't go off, maybe you'll feel better about it. It worked for me.
This is a good tactic for someone that is uneasy with a round in the chamber( at home of course). I was a little hesitant to start carrying a 1911 due to never have been exposed to them before. A few days of this and I realized it was fine and I went hot after that. Same deal with any type of firearm you aren't used to IMHO. I did the same with my first Glock and soon realized the trigger isn't going to pull itself if you have a good holster that will prevent trigger snags.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:27   #26
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I have been carrying like 20 yrs with one in the chamber. You want to stack the odds in your favor as much as possible. If your having to pull the gun, then chamber a round, your already stacking the odds in favor of your attacker. Its all training. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:27   #27
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I carry one in the chamber. Period. But, if you are uneasy, a great way to start, is with a full mag/no chambered but cocked. Do this for as long as it takes to get comfortable with your gun and holster. After a while, you will find the trigger doesn't magically go off. Then, once you are comfortable, put one in the pipe.
My advice exactly.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:29   #28
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Practice holstering and carrying. Like said carry it empty but cocked and see what it takes to pull the trigger. Dont use cheap leather or nylon holsters. Once you get used to carrying it loaded around the house and range you will be set. I carry every gun with a round in the chamber whether it has a safety or not. I have been carrying concealed daily for 10 years and I still dont take it for granted, but I am confident in the way I carry. Better safe then sorry.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:42   #29
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Originally Posted by vandros View Post
I never had and never will have round in the chamber - instead I practice racking the slide when dryfiring. Racking slide instinctively becomes as quick/smooth as drawing from the holster. The time it takes me to take the gun out, rack the slide, and place sights on target is minimal since the gun follows the same trajectory out of the holster and on target without slowing down. Racking the slide takes place while the gun is moving to the target.

My rationale - I want to guarantee no AD due to operator error and I don't want to shoot myself in the hip when the adrenaline dump begins and your fine motor reflexes go out the window making you likely to accidentally place finger on the trigger and squeeze the trigger without realizing you are doing this.

If not cambering round works for Israeli military - a superb force operating in some of the most challenging/dangerous environments - it is good enough for me.

But you need to practice (and practice, and practice) racking the slide. As a bonus, being able to quickly rack the slide makes you faster when clearing malfunctions.
So....... can you draw your weapon and rack the slide with one hand? In a reasonable amount of time, say.... 2 seconds or less?

Could you rack the slide after having fended off a blow from a baseball bat with your left arm, that is now broken in one or more places?

Could you rack the slide with one hand when the lunatic attacking you has stuck his knife into the meaty part of your forearm because you had to block it from entering your chest, and he's now jerking the knife all over hell and gone trying to get it out for another try?

Honestly, I'm not flaming you, i want you to carry however you're comfortable. Just want to give you some scenarios to think about. There is a real chance that in any self defense situation you'll be injured, and who knows what part of your body may or may not be working properly.
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Old 01-24-2013, 21:55   #30
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So....... can you draw your weapon and rack the slide with one hand? In a reasonable amount of time, say.... 2 seconds or less?

Could you rack the slide after having fended off a blow from a baseball bat with your left arm, that is now broken in one or more places?

Could you rack the slide with one hand when the lunatic attacking you has stuck his knife into the meaty part of your forearm because you had to block it from entering your chest, and he's now jerking the knife all over hell and gone trying to get it out for another try?

Honestly, I'm not flaming you, i want you to carry however you're comfortable. Just want to give you some scenarios to think about. There is a real chance that in any self defense situation you'll be injured, and who knows what part of your body may or may not be working properly.
These are good scenarios to ponder... I do practice one-handed chambering - catching the steep-angled back metal sight on the belt, or other clothing I'm wearing. I would concede that this is not the situation you want to find yourself in...

I think some of the scenarios you mentioned can be mitigated with situational awareness: being mindful of the corners, low-light areas, etc. Not all scenarios, but some. But, I guess nothing will effectively address every scenario - unless you are willing to always carry a gun with 33-round mag and have it always in your hand and always with cartridge in the chamber 24/7...
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Old 01-24-2013, 22:04   #31
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Only one way to CCW- and that is, one in the chamber.

Quality training can alleviate any concerns and instill competence and confidence.
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Old 01-24-2013, 22:04   #32
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#1 is to get a good holster. Be careful of any that have a thumb snap. The reason is that holsters with thumb snaps have had the retention strap fall through the trigger guard during the holstering process. The gun is then pushed into the holster where the strap presses against the trigger.

I use either a Galco Concealable or a Sparks VM-II for my G-22. I have carried with a loaded chamber for over 20 years that way and have yet to experience the gun going off so I think you are pretty safe. As long as you do not make it a habit to draw and holster your gun several times a day it will be a non issue. If you want to practice your drawing and holstering capabilities, then unload the gun first. Never practice your gun handling with a hot gun.
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Old 01-24-2013, 22:05   #33
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These are good scenarios to ponder... I do practice one-handed chambering - catching the steep-angled back metal sight on the belt, or other clothing I'm wearing. I would concede that this is not the situation you want to find yourself in...

I think some of the scenarios you mentioned can be mitigated with situational awareness: being mindful of the corners, low-light areas, etc. Not all scenarios, but some. But, I guess nothing will effectively address every scenario - unless you are willing to always carry a gun with 33-round mag in your hand with cartridge in the chamber 24/7...
As always, its the individuals choice of where the line is drawn. Where you feel comfortable is up to you.

Personally, I leave my gun in my holster instead of my hand, the 2 extra mags are on my belt or my ankle for a total of 46 rounds (3 mags plus one in the tube). So not a 33 round mag in my hand....but close!!
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Old 01-24-2013, 22:12   #34
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As always, its the individuals choice of where the line is drawn. Where you feel comfortable is up to you.
Yep, I agree, your preference should come from your own threat assessments and assessments of your abilities and where you draw a line between being perfectly protected against BGs and having a perfect prevention of accidental discharges.
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Old 01-24-2013, 22:17   #35
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Your gun isn't gonna get mad and just decide to shoot you in the thigh.
That is hilarious.


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Old 01-24-2013, 22:35   #36
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These are good scenarios to ponder... I do practice one-handed chambering - catching the steep-angled back metal sight on the belt, or other clothing I'm wearing. I would concede that this is not the situation you want to find yourself in...

I think some of the scenarios you mentioned can be mitigated with situational awareness: being mindful of the corners, low-light areas, etc. Not all scenarios, but some. But, I guess nothing will effectively address every scenario - unless you are willing to always carry a gun with 33-round mag and have it always in your hand and always with cartridge in the chamber 24/7...
To add to the scenarios. You can draw and rack while laying on your back and it takes no extra movement or time? How about when there is no time to present your weapon and firing from the side immediately after drawing is the only option? Your weak arm is incapacitated because someone else got off the first shot? You're carrying a child? You feel 100% ready in ideal situations. Ideal situations rarely happen in a gun fight. It is up to you though. My advise is go take a defensive pistol class where they put you in real life scenarios and see how adequate your system is.
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Old 01-24-2013, 22:38   #37
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Oh and OP, GLOCKS have mags not clips. One of my pet peeves (along with a lot of others).

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Old 01-24-2013, 22:40   #38
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and having a perfect prevention of accidental discharges.
Properly maintained GLOCKS do not accidentally discharge, they are negligently discharged.
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Old 01-24-2013, 23:25   #39
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Always one in the chamber all the time. Put it in the holster in the morning loaded and in the safe at night loaded.Only time to unload is when you switch carry ammo to range ammo and for cleaning.
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Old 01-24-2013, 23:41   #40
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If you're not comfortable with one in the chamber you can always just keep one round in your pocket like Barney Fife.
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