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Old 08-24-2010, 10:12   #126
swinokur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ayz View Post
anyone every get told they can't use the stock glock cases? i'm flying from ATL to Chicago and am not sure if i should run out and get a pelican case, or just save the money and a large padlock on the handle + the glock wire lock should suffice
From TSA web site
Quote:
  • The firearm must be in a hard-sided container.
  • The container must be locked. A locked container is defined as one that completely secures the firearm from access by anyone other than you. Cases that can be pulled open with little effort do not meet this criterion. The pictures provided here illustrate the difference between a properly packaged and an improperly packaged firearm.
The Glock case meets these criteria. Take a copy of the TSA regs with you. I think Mac recommended this in his post.
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Old 08-24-2010, 12:54   #127
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I have used one of the Glock Cases that locks without a problem. They look just like the regular Glock case except have a locking mechanism in it. I buy them from Glockmeister.
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Old 08-24-2010, 13:12   #128
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Mac's Guide to Flying with a Firearm:

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Old 09-13-2010, 12:11   #129
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Just wanted to give my recent flying exprience out of Will Rogers World Airport OKC flying Frontier Airlines, then returning from Denver International Airport flying United Airlines.
I packed my pistol per Mac's guide, using a Gun Vault Nano case secured by the cable tied through the suitcase's interior portion of the handle. The suitcase was a hardsided Samsonite, purchased specifically for carrying my pistol. It featured a mounted TSA lock on the outside of the suitcase.
Carry Issues

At the start of my trip, I went directly to the Will Rogers ticket counter, I used Mac's declaration statement just as he wrote it, and before I could get it all out, the ticket counter babe interupted me, saying," I'm not going to inspect it! It is unloaded isn't it?" In which I responded yes. She had me sign a red tag declaring it was unloaded, and was instructed to put insided the suitcase. So Will Rogers went smooth as a babies butt.
Carry Issues

On my return flight leaving DIA, I packed identical, said the identical statement, and before I could get my entire speil out, was interupted with,"TSA escort!" Meaning, a TSA employee had to escort me to another room with a screener machine and several TSA employees, where my luggage was screened with the machine but not opened, asked me if it the pistol was in a hardsided, locked case, then was given the "I'm finished" look from TSA, and the TSA escort took my suitcase back to United, and directed me to the TSA passenger screening area.

Soooo, wasn't a bad experience like I had imagined in my mind leading up to the flight. I will fly with my firearm without to much concern in the future.

I want to thank this forum, and especially this post for an accurate guide for firearm travel.

Last edited by takeanumbr; 09-13-2010 at 12:20.. Reason: Spelling
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Old 09-13-2010, 12:22   #130
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Great report. Mac nailed it. I think many folks think it's complicated. pretty easy if you follow the rules. Glad your trip was uneventful
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Old 09-20-2010, 10:05   #131
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A stock glock case and stock glock cable lock are all you need.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ayz View Post
anyone every get told they can't use the stock glock cases? i'm flying from ATL to Chicago and am not sure if i should run out and get a pelican case, or just save the money and a large padlock on the handle + the glock wire lock should suffice
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Old 10-10-2010, 19:37   #132
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Any advice if you have a connection/layover in NYC? Are you out of luck? Do their ammo restrictions (HP, mag capacity) affect you, or are you covered by fed laws regarding travel through where you're legal at the endpoints?

Heard rumors of ugly stuff in NYC when people get layovers, or flight problems keep them stranded overnight...

Randy
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Old 10-10-2010, 19:48   #133
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Hi Mac, great post. I've flown with firearms without the regs printed and everyone was friendly and co-operative. Even in California of all places! Nobody has ever asked me to open the bag and inspect however. It was declare, sign and I was on my way.

Also, I have to toot my own horn here. I own a submachinegun and it is rather tough to travel with submachineguns as there are a lack of TSA legal hard cases for them. One of my new product lines features a hard case with custom cut foam. If you are a frequent flyer with firearm - this might interest you.

Here's my case.

Carry Issues

I'm going to be doing them custom - you can have your gun, slots for mags, two guns, cutouts for ammo boxes, etc - all in hard foam cut on an CNC router.
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Old 10-10-2010, 20:20   #134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveksux View Post
Any advice if you have a connection/layover in NYC? Are you out of luck? Do their ammo restrictions (HP, mag capacity) affect you, or are you covered by fed laws regarding travel through where you're legal at the endpoints?

Heard rumors of ugly stuff in NYC when people get layovers, or flight problems keep them stranded overnight...

Randy
DO NOT i repeat DO NOT take possession of your suitcase containing the firearm during your layover. Make arrangements with the airline to secure it. A court case in the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals denied the appeal of a traveler found guilt of weapons possession in NJ because the defendant "had access " to the luggage when he went to a hotel for an unscheduled layover and therefore could not claim FOPA protection The court denied the appeal only on the grounds of his "having access" to the firearm in violation of FOPA. I read from this is that it's OK to travel in NY with a firearm but if you layover don't "have access" to the firearm. I'd pack overnight clothes and put them in your carry on and make arrangements with the airline to secure your luggage overnight.

Link to appeal:

http://www.morelaw.com/verdicts/case...9&s=NJ&d=43309

Last edited by swinokur; 10-10-2010 at 20:29..
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Old 10-11-2010, 02:09   #135
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Originally Posted by swinokur View Post
DO NOT i repeat DO NOT take possession of your suitcase containing the firearm during your layover. Make arrangements with the airline to secure it. A court case in the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals denied the appeal of a traveler found guilt of weapons possession in NJ because the defendant "had access " to the luggage when he went to a hotel for an unscheduled layover and therefore could not claim FOPA protection The court denied the appeal only on the grounds of his "having access" to the firearm in violation of FOPA. I read from this is that it's OK to travel in NY with a firearm but if you layover don't "have access" to the firearm. I'd pack overnight clothes and put them in your carry on and make arrangements with the airline to secure your luggage overnight.

Link to appeal:

http://www.morelaw.com/verdicts/case...9&s=NJ&d=43309
That is an excellent read, in terms of available information. And it does directly refute (at least in part) what the BATF agent communicated to me on the phone. Granted, part of their comments to were recent, and this case began quite a while ago. But it's still a VERY compelling read. Out of the public court documents for that case, referenced by the link above, it states:

"Although we conclude that Revell fell outside of § 926A’s protection during his stay in New Jersey, we recognize that he had been placed in a difficult predicament through no fault of his own. However, Section 926 clearly requires the traveler to part ways with his weapon and ammunition during travel; it does not address this type of interrupted journey or what the traveler is to do in this situation. Stranded gun owners like Revell have the option of going to law enforcement representatives at an airport or to airport personnel before they retrieve their luggage. The careful owner will do so and explain his situation, requesting that his firearm and ammunition be held for him overnight.18 While this no doubt adds to the inconvenience imposed upon the unfortunate traveler when his transportation plans go awry, it offers a reasonable means for a responsible gun owner to maintain the protection of Section 926 and prevent unexpected exposure to state and local gun regulations.
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Old 10-11-2010, 07:35   #136
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Mac, I'm guessing BATFE agents don't keep up with case law. Although a ruling in the 3rd circuit only affects courts in that circuit, many Federal courts are loathe to issue differing opinions in similar cases. NJ and NY seem to be the most unfriendly to gun owners even when they try to comply. Because of their aggressive actions and the ruling from the 3rd circuit, I would recommend that anyone stuck in a city during a layover, accidental or not, store their weapon in compliance with this ruling. I have not had to do this but I'm guessing either the airline or perhaps a Skycap or someone else can make arrangements for overnight storage

Seems like an easy way to avoid a huge and expensive hassle.
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Old 10-11-2010, 07:45   #137
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How were people's experiences in JFK and LaGuardia? And with what airlines. I've never flown anywhere with my firearm, but am not so hesitant after reading this thread. My main concern is having the gun stolen from my luggage.
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Old 10-11-2010, 08:17   #138
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From my reading NYC is not much better than NJ in aggressive enforcement. If you fly into NYC or NJ, better off leaving your bag at the airport if laying over. Under no circumstances would I stay in either state while in possession of a firearm


As has been recommended, cable lock your pistol case inside your suitcase. Minimizes the chance of theft

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Old 10-11-2010, 11:46   #139
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I agree Swinokur. Wise gun owners will stay within the bounds of recent caselaw wherever possible, no matter how "unjust" some may feel it is.

I've flown through NY/NJ plenty and never had an issue, but I've never missed a connection or anything.

I've done a bit of reading and calling this morning to research what I would do in this situation, based upon this case, specifically in the NY/NJ airport system. Based upon that case, here's how I will respond when flying through there and facing an unexpected layover. Your mileage may vary, but this is what I'll do:

1. I always fly with the case locked and locked into the spine of the bag as shown in this thread. For me, that's must, but even moreso if you're flying through a city where, in the event of a disruption, you should not take control of your bag.

2. As soon as I find out that that my flight is delayed, and before I take control of my bag, I'll find out if there is overnight storage for bags. If so, I'll do what needs to be done to secure it the storage, either with the airline themselves or etc.

3. I'll notify an officer (preferably TSA but second best would be NY/NJ PA) of the problem I'm facing, the laws I am bound by (with copies of the firearm law that says I can trasport to where I'm going and etc), and ask if the officer would transport the bag for me to storage. I think showing sensitivity to not "taking possession", even if you are entitled to in the airport, is good thing here. Plus, you have a formal witness that you didn't take the bag out of the airport, but instead left it in storage. Based upon the reasoning in the case, this should satisfy the "reasonable" test of what you should do to not take possession.

4. I would then record the officer's name, etc, and make some sort of formal log of when my flight was canceled, where the bag was stored, and who assisted me at the airport (including employees of the airline).

5. Then I'm done. Based upon my calls today to both airports, a conversation with TSA, and a followup call placed to NY BATFE, they all commented in my conversations with them that this would be more than sufficient to satisfy an "avoiding all appearances of evil" test according to their responsibilities and how they interact with the law.

Keep in mind your backup plan. If your destination isn't far, or if you can get a flight out of a new airport and DON'T want to stay in NYC for a night, then rent a car, put the back in the trunk, and drive out of the state to a place that recognizes your permit or etc. Plus, the laws were really written most for people driving through a place.


By the way, I'm not very intimidated by this new set of protocols for myself. I've flown through NY/NJ dozens of times and never had a problem. And if it did occur, these new protocols will likely cost me a bit of time but probably not much more, especially if you are assisted by TSA (who according to my conversation with them today would likely be more than willing to take and store the bag for you at the airport).

And the worst of the worst case? Just stay in the airport that night. It's uncomfortable, but people do it all the time. And a minor inconvenience when you consider what it's worth to be able to defend yourself while you travel.
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Old 10-11-2010, 12:02   #140
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Mac, my concern is with neither TSA or BATFE. IMO It's the local police who are the issue here. They are the ones most likely to detain or arrest you. I think it would be prudent to check with The Port Authority Police and NYPD to get their opinion. Maybe even the state guys as well.

My plan is to never ever fly through or visit NY or NJ. I can spend my money elsewhere. Luckily work travel doesn't take me there.
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Old 10-19-2010, 08:12   #141
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There have been several posts asking if TSA employees can handle your firearm. The answer according to the quoted text below in NO. The NRA page I'm posting is not law, but it states what TSA's policy is, according to the Director in 2006. I think this would be sufficient to use as documentation in the event of an issue. It certainly may force to TSA to actually publish the policy. I am guessing the airlines' have a similar policy.

Quote:

In order to help NRA Members navigate their way through the nation’s airports with the least amount of trouble, we asked TSA’s Michael J. Restovich key questions about traveling with firearms and ammunition.

In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks on America, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was formed to ensure that every possible step is taken to prevent the use of a commercial airliner as a terrorist weapon. As part of its responsibility to keep the nation’s air traffic system safe and efficient, TSA has the immense duty of screening every single passenger. In that capacity, shooters and hunters traveling with firearms must interact with TSA airport personnel.

Every day, thousands of screenings involving air travelers transporting firearms occur without incident, but because there has been concern and, in some cases, dissatisfaction, TSA has sought the assistance of America’s law-abiding gun owners. Working together, NRA and its members can offer suggestions on how TSA might streamline its procedures, and at the same time we can provide a huge boost in public awareness of this vital security operation. By understanding the rules and procedures that must be followed when traveling with firearms and ammunition, we can avoid delays and other potential problems. To provide NRA members with the best answers concerning recurring firearms-related air-travel questions, we sat down with Michael J. Restovich, Assistant Administrator, TSA Office of Security Operations.

NRA: Many gun owners become frustrated when traveling with firearms. It seems that every time you go to check in a firearm at an airline baggage counter, the rules have changed. What can travelers do to get through this process as smoothly as possible?

TSA: The Federal regulations for transporting firearms and ammunition are actually the same as they were before 9/11/2001. However, the screening process for passengers and checked baggage has changed substantially.

The perception that rules have changed is likely due to varying airline requirements as well as differing airport screening-equipment configurations.

The passenger traveling with firearms can greatly reduce potential problems by knowing the rules and being prepared upon arrival at the airport. Passengers need to know not only what the TSA requirements are, but the airlines’ requirements and also local/state laws at their destination.

NRA: May a gun owner pack ammunition in the same piece of luggage as a firearm? TSA regulations seem to allow it, but many airlines say “no.”

TSA: Yes. Firearms and ammunition may be packed together in the same locked, hard-sided case, provided a few simple rules are followed (see below for ammunition-packing instructions). The number of firearms and amount of ammunition allowed on individual airlines varies widely. It is highly advisable to check with the airlines ahead of time and have a copy of their policy with you. The hard copy of the policy you produce at the ticket counter will usually settle most issues. If not, ask for a supervisor.

NRA: How does ammunition have to be packaged? TSA guidelines say ammunition has to be in “fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition,” but a lot of airlines seem to insist on “factory boxes.” Naturally, this creates problems for handloaders or people who use custom-loaded ammo.

TSA: The packaging for ammunition must be either original packaging or containers designed specifically for ammunition. Plastic ammunition boxes popular with reloaders are acceptable, as well as paper or fiber boxes.

Ammunition may be loaded in clips or magazines as long as they are properly secured in a pouch or enclosure designed to secure clips or magazines.

NRA: Why does TSA confiscate items that obviously aren’t real firearms or ammunition, such as “silver bullet” key chains or even lapel pins and tie tacks in the shape of miniature firearms?

TSA: Replicas are prohibited through the checkpoint, but upon discovery in screening, we encourage the passenger to do one of three things: return to their airline and check the item in their checked baggage, return the item to their car, or mail it back to themselves (if the airport has a mail-back program).

If none of those is feasible, the least preferred option is to voluntarily surrender it to TSA. The only exception is if a law has been broken, then the item is turned over to local law enforcement.

The problem with “silver bullet” key fob-type items is the burden they place on our system. Our number one priority is security. Realistic replica items are prohibited because they could be mistaken by unknowing passengers or crew members as a real item and lead to an unnecessary situation in the secure area of an airport or in the cabin of an aircraft. Also there is the risk that terrorists could carry what seems to be a replica but is actually part of a dangerous weapon.

Obvious non-threat items such as tie tacks in the shape of firearms are now permitted. However, TSA has found small, very real, handguns attached to belt buckles and even one stuffed inside a child’s teddy bear. Every item must be scrutinized very carefully and that detracts from overall security by reducing our efficiency. If there is any question as to whether the replica will be confiscated then we encourage you to pack it in checked baggage.

NRA: Are TSA employees trained in the legalities of transporting firearms and ammunition?

TSA: Yes, part of the 120 hours of classroom and on the job training our TSA personnel receive includes regulations regarding the identification of and processing of firearms in checked bags.

NRA: Are TSA employees trained in the proper ways to handle and inspect checked firearms?

TSA: No. In fact, they are specifically prohibited from handling firearms.

Should there be an occasion requiring the handling of a firearm, a law enforcement officer is called to handle the firearm.

NRA: Do airlines consult TSA regarding the airlines’ rules on transporting firearms and ammunition?

TSA: No. Each individual airline determines if, when, and how firearms and ammunition or any other item is allowed aboard their aircraft for transport.

Federal law and regulations simply provide guidelines and specific requirements if the airlines choose to allow firearms and ammunition to be transported.

NRA: Has there been discussion between TSA and the airline industry in regard to standardizing gun/ammunition transport rules and regulations?

TSA: TSA is in discussions with airline industry trade associations to address a number of these issues. The dialogue is geared to developing uniform standards to include the number of firearms permitted in checked bags, the amount of ammunition (in pounds), firearms declaration procedures, declaration tag format, etc.

NRA: Does TSA have any involvement in educating ticketing agents about regulations and/or procedures governing transport of firearms and ammunition?

TSA: Yes. However, it is usually on a case-by-case basis. Typically, a complaint is received from an individual that will cause us to review procedures with the airlines. We then determine if it is an airline or TSA issue. We then make a determination if the issue is a local or national issue and take corrective action as required.

NRA: Do air travelers specifically and separately need to declare both firearms and ammunition? In addition to inspection of firearms, does TSA make any effort to inspect ammunition in checked baggage?

TSA: Only firearms are required to be declared. If TSA has a security concern with a checked bag and we discover improperly packed ammunition we will remove the loose or improperly packed ammunition and turn it over to the airline for disposal.

NRA: When a disagreement arises between a traveler and TSA personnel, what is the correct protocol for on-site resolution? In such cases would it be helpful for traveling sportsmen to carry a printed copy of TSA firearms/ammunition regulations?

TSA: It is very helpful to have firearms and ammunition information from http://www.tsa.gov, as well as the airline’s policy. Should a problem occur, calmly explain the situation to the TSA officer (with policy in hand). If this fails, remain calm and ask to speak with a TSA supervisor. We always try to balance security and customer service, but we realize our officers may not always respond correctly. Any time passengers feel they have been treated improperly or their baggage was mishandled by our personnel we want to know about it.

Passengers may call our customer service number at 1-866-289- 9673 or E-mail our contact center at TSA-ContactCenter@dhs.gov.

TSA is always looking to improve both security and customer service.

NRA: How are TSA firearms/ammunition regulations formulated? What provision is there in the law to change such regulations?

TSA: With the creation of TSA in November 2001, responsibility for many of the regulations for transportation of firearms and ammunition were transferred from the FAA to TSA. There have been no actual regulation changes, however, TSA has sought to clarify ambiguities and apply the commonsense test to some of the rules. Our clarification of the original packaging requirement for ammunition is just one example.

NRA: How are TSA employees instructed to deal with travelers who accidentally enter security screening detectors carrying firearms or ammunition on their persons or in carry-on luggage? What are the penalties for doing so?

TSA: There’s a wide range of procedures TSA has to follow, depending on the circumstances. The most serious occurs when someone brings a loaded handgun to one of our passenger security checkpoints. Once the passenger steps through the metal detector, or places their carry-on baggage on the x-ray belt at our checkpoint, they have presented themselves for screening and TSA has to complete the screening process. If a firearm is detected either on the passenger or in his carry-on items, TSA will engage local law enforcement officers. Aside from possible criminal charges brought forth by law enforcement, TSA has the ability to impose civil case proceedings with fines ranging up to $10,000. While virtually all of the firearms discovered at our checkpoints are believed to be simple mistakes, it is impossible for us to make that determination.

TSA personnel must be alert to the possibility of someone testing our system or a passenger unknowingly being used by others to introduce a firearm or other device into our secure areas.

Loose rounds of ammunition also can pose an issue at the checkpoint and delay the passenger. An individual with ammunition at the checkpoint may simply receive a warning letter or the incident may result in fines.

Improperly packed firearms and ammunition in luggage may also pose an issue. When such an incident occurs, the passenger is called back to the checked baggage screening point and asked to secure the improperly packed item. We recommend allowing extra time for the firearm to be screened so that the passenger can be made aware of any potential issues should they arise.

Improperly packaged ammunition often ends up being surrendered.

NRA: Is there a toll-free number or website air travelers can call or access to report suspected security violations? What about a toll-free number or website where air travelers can file complaints or offer suggestions about TSA procedures and personnel?

TSA: If you would like to pass on any positive feedback or concerns to TSA regarding your experience you should contact a screener supervisor at the airport.

You may also contact the TSA Contact Center toll-free at 1-866-289-9673 or you may also E-mail us at TSA-ContactCenter@dhs.gov. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) takes all input very seriously and will respond promptly and appropriately to all complaints or comments. Please visit our website at www.TSA.gov.

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NOTE: TSA only allows loaded magazines if the open end is covered as in placing the open end into a mag pouch. Check with your airline. Some won't even if TSA says it's ok

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Old 11-07-2010, 14:13   #142
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OK.... I've done this twice now. Two round trips = four experiences checking a firearm.

Palm Beach --> Little Rock via Delta: Delta agent put the firearms declaration tag INSIDE my locked Pelican case (which is cable-locked to the frame inside soft-sided suitcase). Then I had to take my luggage (with an escort) to a special TSA security checkpoint.

Little Rock --> Palm Beach via Delta: Ticket agent also put declaration tag INSIDE locked Pelican case. But, then luggage went on conveyor belt.


Palm Beach --> Tampa via Southwest: Ticket agent TAPED declaration tag on the OUTSIDE of my locked Pelican case.

Tampa --> Palm Beach via Southwest: Ticket agent insisted that declaration tag simply go inside softsided luggage (anywhere) rather than taped to the outside of Pelican case or inside Pelican case. Then I had to be escorted (along with another guy declaring a firearm) to a separate TSA checkpoint. We stood there while they scanned our suitcases and then were told we were good to go.

OK... It seems to me that there would logically be some CONSISTENCY to this process. So far, all four experiences were DIFFERENT.

I also believe it seems rather illogical to put the declaration tag INSIDE the locked gun case. Nobody will ever see it, except ME when I get to my destination. The one time the ticket agent taped it the outside of the gun case made the most sense to me. And, even at the same airport (Palm Beach), one time I was escorted to a TSA checkpoint. Another time the luggage went on the conveyor belt. So, what is the story here?

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Old 11-07-2010, 15:04   #143
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Welcome to the TSA and air travel, where the only standards are NO standards. I totally agree that if you are the only person with the key to your firearm case, it is completely illogical to place the tag inside the locked case. If TSA conducts a secondary search and the tag is not visible to them, they have no idea whether the firearm was declared or not. I put most of the blame on the airlines for poor training of their ticket agents. I have found absolutely nothing in the TSA regs or US CFR addressing the declaration tag location. Even so, common sense should dictate where the tag logically should go..

Oh wait, nevermind.

As far as the differences in how TSA treats your bag at different airports, it depends on where the TSA scanner is located. Airports were never designed for these large heavy devices so they have to be placed where there is room and the floor can take the weight. Sometimes it's in a different area and no 2 airports are exactly the same
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Old 11-07-2010, 15:10   #144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by racer88 View Post
OK.... I've done this twice now. Two round trips = four experiences checking a firearm.
[SNIP]

Quote:
OK... It seems to me that there would logically be some CONSISTENCY to this process. So far, all four experiences were DIFFERENT.

I also believe it seems rather illogical to put the declaration tag INSIDE the locked gun case. Nobody will ever see it, except ME when I get to my destination. The one time the ticket agent taped it the outside of the gun case made the most sense to me. And, even at the same airport (Palm Beach), one time I was escorted to a TSA checkpoint. Another time the luggage went on the conveyor belt. So, what is the story here?
I will be heading to West Palm Beach on Southwest next week, and my previous experience there matches yours when they escorted you downstairs to the TSA area.

I think some of the inconsistency with handguns stems from the practice on long guns, where the gun case IS the luggage. The tag goes inside, because you don't want to advertise the contents, but...it's a gun case!!! Hard to disguise that!

I agree that attaching the declaration to a handgun case inside the luggage makes the most sense. One TSA agent at SeaTac explained it to me: When the luggage goes through TSA screening and the x-rays reveal a firearm, they open the luggage to ensure you've declared it to the airline as being unloaded. The tag is evidence of that. If it's inside the gun case, they can't see it. If it's loose in your luggage and not near the gun case, they could miss it. If it's taped to the gun case, or attached via string (I've done that when the tag includes a string), there's no question.

I wish the TSA would clarify the requirements so the airlines would be consistent!
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Old 11-07-2010, 15:15   #145
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I wish the TSA would clarify the requirements so the airlines would be consistent!
They can't. They're the TSA

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Old 11-15-2010, 06:57   #146
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OK, just checked in at Southwest in West Palm Beach (PBIA), and it was perfect! The agent got the declaration form, had me fill it out and open my bag, then got a roll of clear tape and taped the form to the outside of my Secure-it/Center-of-Mass lock box. I told her that when I checked in at SWA in BWI, the agent had me put the form inside the lock box. I asked the BWI agent how can the TSA see that I've properly declared the firearm?, and she had the brilliant response "I guess they can see inside".

The agent at PBIA complimented me on my lockbox and said she liked how it was secured to the frame of my luggage. She said I wouldn't believe some of the boxes people try to use that completely compromise the security of the firearm.

One new wrinkle - she didn't have me escorted downstairs to the entrance to the TSA area by baggage claim. She just put the bag on the conveyor behind the counter.
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:19   #147
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Each airport's scanners are in a different location. That's why some go on the conveyor and other times they escort you
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:22   #148
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:29   #149
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Originally Posted by swinokur View Post
Each airport's scanners are in a different location. That's why some go on the conveyor and other times they escort you
I know, but I've always been escorted at THIS airport before. The only difference is that this is the first time I've flown SWA from PBIA.
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:56   #150
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that is strange. But hey, it's TSA right? The only procedure they have is be inconsistent. This helps confuse the terrorists as well as everyone else.





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