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Old 07-09-2009, 12:04   #561
BigKid
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Hey Blinky, I posted the story in its own thread cause it wasn't really an "ask the trainer type of deal" but to make a long story short, we met my puppies older sister last night (6 months older). It was kind of a view into the future. His sister was very dog aggressive. She attempted to attack McBain but her owner restrained her. He blames it on the breeder and the fact that their dad was very aggressive. If this is true and it is bred into him, what can I do to not have this be an issue for McBain? I figure proper socialization is key so I decided that I will stay in this class so that he can be around other puppies and get as much socialization as he can. Do you have any other recommendations?

Thanks Blinky.
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Old 08-21-2009, 14:32   #562
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Originally Posted by BigKid View Post
Hey Blinky, I posted the story in its own thread cause it wasn't really an "ask the trainer type of deal" but to make a long story short, we met my puppies older sister last night (6 months older). It was kind of a view into the future. His sister was very dog aggressive. She attempted to attack McBain but her owner restrained her. He blames it on the breeder and the fact that their dad was very aggressive. If this is true and it is bred into him, what can I do to not have this be an issue for McBain? I figure proper socialization is key so I decided that I will stay in this class so that he can be around other puppies and get as much socialization as he can. Do you have any other recommendations?

Thanks Blinky.
Wow, sorry for taking so long to get to this!!

First of all, blaming genetics like that is a cop out. Yes, some dogs are more dominate than others, but aggression is a totally separate issue. What that person is doing, is confusing a personality trait with a behavior. Aggression is a behavior and can be dealt with.

As far as you're concerned, socialization is never ever going to hurt anything, but you need to focus on your relationship with the dog. As long as your properly exercising him and have established the leader/follower relationship, the chance for any aggression problems are greatly reduced.
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Old 08-21-2009, 14:36   #563
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Thanks Blinky, no worries on the time it took to get back to me. I figured you were busy and then I forgot about my own post.

Everyone who has met his sister and met my pup have all said they seem like 2 different dogs. So I am glad to hear that aggression isn't genetic. But if it isn't genetic why are there dogs that everyone claims is predisposed to being dog aggressive dogs? Such as pit bulls, rottweillers, GSDs, etc? Is it just a high prey drive in their breed that owners mis-allocate into aggression (either on purpose or by accident)?
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Old 08-21-2009, 15:13   #564
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Thanks Blinky, no worries on the time it took to get back to me. I figured you were busy and then I forgot about my own post.

Everyone who has met his sister and met my pup have all said they seem like 2 different dogs. So I am glad to hear that aggression isn't genetic. But if it isn't genetic why are there dogs that everyone claims is predisposed to being dog aggressive dogs? Such as pit bulls, rottweillers, GSDs, etc? Is it just a high prey drive in their breed that owners mis-allocate into aggression (either on purpose or by accident)?
You're exactly right, the majority of owners don't understand the difference between aggression, dominance, energy and drive.

Energy, drive and dominance are personality traits of a dog. Most of the dogs that people label as aggressive are high energy dogs that the owners don't know how to deal with properly.

High energy dogs, well all dogs, but more so high energy, need to have structured outlets for their energy. If not, they will find their own outlets and most of the time they are destructive behaviors.

The issue of having a dominate dog comes up less than one might think. There are actually very few dogs with the skills to be a leader compared to the total number of dogs. If they were all born leaders, then there would be no packs.

Dogs are hard wired to have a leader. If they feel a void in that department, they will attempt to take the leadership role. As I pointed out, since the majority of dogs are not born leaders, they don't have the tools to take that roll and they usually end up with behavior issues.

Aggression is not the problem, but more so the outcome and/or symptom of other issues. Aggression is a behavior plain and simple. By addressing the bigger issues you will address the aggression.
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Old 09-10-2009, 18:06   #565
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Hey Blinky, got a question for you. It's been awhile, thought i'd work your brain a bit. My pup is 4.5 months old now and has started barking like crazy at the sight of other dogs. Once he is close enough to "attack" if he wanted to, he goes into play mode. Is this a behavior I should squash? Is this normal? He hasn't acted the least bit aggressive other then the bark and hair standing up. No snarling, no growling. If i need to squash it, how do you recommend I do it? I've done "No!", i've done leash corrections, I've grabbed by the nap of the neck with a stern no. He barks through it as though he can't control it (though I know he can). Its not a big deal if he is in the yard but it gets quite startling while driving in the truck with hi in the passenger seat. He will even bark at dogs he knows very well (my sister has 2 full grown labs that he plays with quite a bit) and as soon as he gets out of the truck he is all about play.

Also, he gets fixed tomorrow. So perhaps that will calm him down a smidge in that area?

Thanks
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Old 09-18-2009, 11:18   #566
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Old 09-18-2009, 18:48   #567
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Originally Posted by BigKid View Post
Hey Blinky, got a question for you. It's been awhile, thought i'd work your brain a bit. My pup is 4.5 months old now and has started barking like crazy at the sight of other dogs. Once he is close enough to "attack" if he wanted to, he goes into play mode. Is this a behavior I should squash? Is this normal? He hasn't acted the least bit aggressive other then the bark and hair standing up. No snarling, no growling. If i need to squash it, how do you recommend I do it? I've done "No!", i've done leash corrections, I've grabbed by the nap of the neck with a stern no. He barks through it as though he can't control it (though I know he can). Its not a big deal if he is in the yard but it gets quite startling while driving in the truck with hi in the passenger seat. He will even bark at dogs he knows very well (my sister has 2 full grown labs that he plays with quite a bit) and as soon as he gets out of the truck he is all about play.

Also, he gets fixed tomorrow. So perhaps that will calm him down a smidge in that area?

Thanks
Well, it's normal in a sense that it sounds like you're dealing with a dog that has a high play drive. Really, the best way to deal with that is focused and structured activities. The first being the daily walks, but have you considered trying other activities with him? Maybe looking into agility and things like that?

As far as dealing with the behavior as it happens, this is where you have to outlast the dog. If you were a client of mine, I would approach this by first getting the dog very tired. Maybe a bike ride or really long walk, then placing the dog in a situation that would trigger the behavior. Once the dog starts the beginning of the behavior, you have to correct and then try to keep the focus on you. If he's responds to treats or has a favorite toy, this is a good time to use it to keep the dogs focus on you. It's also not a bad idea to stand in front of the dog, blocking his view of the other dogs. Do not remove your dog from the situation and do not get closer until the dog has focused on you. If the behavior starts 50 feet away, that's where you keep the dog, for as long as it takes. Then you can move closer, it may take a while, but with patience it can be done.

With a tired dog, you're not going to get as much resistance, but the point of the exercise will still stick with the dog through enough repetition.

edit, getting the dog fixed may help in that area, but since we're talking about play drive, then it's hard to say. It will help in other aspects though. Since you're dog will not be worried about reproducing etc.... the "bad" behaviors that can surround that will be less noticeable.
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Old 09-20-2009, 10:47   #568
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why does my dog keep throwing up bile?? 1-2 times a week now usally in the morning...
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Old 09-20-2009, 11:40   #569
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why does my dog keep throwing up bile?? 1-2 times a week now usally in the morning...
I'm not even going to attempt that one, sorry man. He needs to get to vet asap.
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Old 09-21-2009, 11:27   #570
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new...

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Old 02-24-2010, 17:39   #571
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I don't know if this thread is still active, I don't usually visit here. But I am having a problem with our puppy. We have a Siberian Husky that steals food from the table, counter tops or anywhere she finds it. She amazingly does not beg for food when we are eating, she just lays under the table but as soon as we are gone, if something is left she goes for it all nice and quiet. You walk into the room, she goes and hides with that look.

I have tried several things to try and break her of this bad habit but have been unsuccessful. Any advice would be greatly appreciated., thanks.
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Old 03-01-2010, 00:38   #572
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I don't know if this thread is still active, I don't usually visit here. But I am having a problem with our puppy. We have a Siberian Husky that steals food from the table, counter tops or anywhere she finds it. She amazingly does not beg for food when we are eating, she just lays under the table but as soon as we are gone, if something is left she goes for it all nice and quiet. You walk into the room, she goes and hides with that look.

I have tried several things to try and break her of this bad habit but have been unsuccessful. Any advice would be greatly appreciated., thanks.
I've heard that leaving mouse traps set on the counter tops, or other "booby-traps" are an effective deterrent. I have a Malamute that is tall enough to see whats on the counter, and he's not allowed in the kitchen at all, to keep him away from the counter surfing temptations.
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Old 03-01-2010, 06:17   #573
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I've heard that leaving mouse traps set on the counter tops, or other "booby-traps" are an effective deterrent. I have a Malamute that is tall enough to see whats on the counter, and he's not allowed in the kitchen at all, to keep him away from the counter surfing temptations.

That is a great idea but I think that my wife might have a different opinion. Plus my dog is a Husky, she will realize that it causes her pain, she will probably figure out a way to trip it with something first & then steal the food. Dam intelligent dogs!
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Old 03-02-2010, 08:54   #574
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Originally Posted by Nicky D View Post
I don't know if this thread is still active, I don't usually visit here. But I am having a problem with our puppy. We have a Siberian Husky that steals food from the table, counter tops or anywhere she finds it. She amazingly does not beg for food when we are eating, she just lays under the table but as soon as we are gone, if something is left she goes for it all nice and quiet. You walk into the room, she goes and hides with that look.

I have tried several things to try and break her of this bad habit but have been unsuccessful. Any advice would be greatly appreciated., thanks.
Sorry it took so long to reply, but how is she with her sit/down stays?
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Old 03-04-2010, 20:38   #575
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Hey Blinky, I got one for ya. I'm not sure how to correct it because I don't really know how to recreate it. Here is the situation:

A kid who lives on my block has one of those weedeater engine powered scooters. He flies up and down the block sporadically. My GSD will be mid nap, here him coming and bolt to the front yard fence and chase him the length of my yard barking (I have a fenced in front yard). I just got a text from my girlfriend who stopped by my house to do me a favor and while going in the house, the kid goes by on the scooter. My dog is gone. 2 blocks later he stops chasing and turns and she picks him up. Scolded him and he has been pouting ever since, she says. However, what concerns me is that last week, I came home, opened the gate to pull my truck in, and a kid on a bike goes by and he chases him down too. Absolutely no aggression, his tail is wagging and he thinks its a fun game. Prior to these 2 instances, he sit and stays while we pull a car into the yard. People have walked by, cars have driven by, kids have been playing in the street (which he struggles with his "stay" cause he wants to play with them so badly, but he never actually gets up). Any advice? He scared the snot out of both kids (when I say kids, they are 16ish) cause this 80 lb GSD is running at them and they don't understand that he just thinks they are playing.

Thanks Blinky.
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Old 03-05-2010, 10:50   #576
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Sorry it took so long to reply, but how is she with her sit/down stays?

For the most part she is good with sit and down. She does not stay too well. This is something that we are working on with her. The other problem is that she does not come all of the time when she is called. She will sit there and decide if it is what she wants to do, if so great, if not then you might as well just forget it. She will run and wait for you to chase her, she thinks that it is a game.

I know that she is a Husky and that they have a mind of their own and will analyze a situation to see if it suits their needs. There are just a couple of issues that I really want to train her better.
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Old 03-06-2010, 05:08   #577
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She will run and wait for you to chase her, she thinks that it is a game.
It is a game that could be turned to your advantage...

http://www.dogstardaily.com/training/malamute-memories

One thing I learned from one of the dog training books I read is to never call your dog over to you to punish it, always go to the dog. That way it doesn't associate 'come' with punishment.
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Old 03-07-2010, 12:59   #578
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Originally Posted by BigKid View Post
Hey Blinky, I got one for ya. I'm not sure how to correct it because I don't really know how to recreate it. Here is the situation:

A kid who lives on my block has one of those weedeater engine powered scooters. He flies up and down the block sporadically. My GSD will be mid nap, here him coming and bolt to the front yard fence and chase him the length of my yard barking (I have a fenced in front yard). I just got a text from my girlfriend who stopped by my house to do me a favor and while going in the house, the kid goes by on the scooter. My dog is gone. 2 blocks later he stops chasing and turns and she picks him up. Scolded him and he has been pouting ever since, she says. However, what concerns me is that last week, I came home, opened the gate to pull my truck in, and a kid on a bike goes by and he chases him down too. Absolutely no aggression, his tail is wagging and he thinks its a fun game. Prior to these 2 instances, he sit and stays while we pull a car into the yard. People have walked by, cars have driven by, kids have been playing in the street (which he struggles with his "stay" cause he wants to play with them so badly, but he never actually gets up). Any advice? He scared the snot out of both kids (when I say kids, they are 16ish) cause this 80 lb GSD is running at them and they don't understand that he just thinks they are playing.

Thanks Blinky.
I'm curious, does this only happen with those particular scooters or does it happen with people on bikes or non-powered scooters? I'm wondering if it is the sound coupled with the motion or just the sight of a single person traveling at that speed triggering the behavior.
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Old 03-07-2010, 19:36   #579
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I'm curious, does this only happen with those particular scooters or does it happen with people on bikes or non-powered scooters? I'm wondering if it is the sound coupled with the motion or just the sight of a single person traveling at that speed triggering the behavior.
He gets excited about bikes and skateboards too
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Old 03-08-2010, 06:53   #580
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It is a game that could be turned to your advantage...

http://www.dogstardaily.com/training/malamute-memories

One thing I learned from one of the dog training books I read is to never call your dog over to you to punish it, always go to the dog. That way it doesn't associate 'come' with punishment.
Thanks for the link. That is one thing I really avoid, even as difficult as it is sometimes. I was taught that a long time ago.
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