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Old 03-21-2013, 22:39   #1
jame
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I'm a little concerned about some of the new gun owners.

I hate to be indelicate, because we're all "2nd Amendment, HELL YEAH!" around here, but is anyone mildly concerned about some of the new gun owners that have zero experience with firearms?

I've talked a bit with some of the guys at my local place of business, and they say they do. My concern is that the new guy is going to come home from work and throw his loaded G26 in his sock drawer when he gets home, without a second thought that his 6 year old will get his hands on it.

Has anyone else had the same thoughts?
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Old 03-21-2013, 22:41   #2
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I'm worried too. So many accidental shootings around here lately. Someone just shot themselves in the hand while upholstering and another while they were cleaning. Pulled the trigger cause they thought it was empty... With their other hand over the barrel.


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Old 03-22-2013, 08:42   #3
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Someone just shot themselves in the hand while upholstering and another while they were cleaning.
Everyone knows you're supposed to SPIT the nails and tacks you are hammering.

Someone must have told him, "You've got a tack driver there.", and being a noob, well, he....
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Old 03-24-2013, 14:00   #4
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Originally Posted by Hawkeye16 View Post
I'm worried too. So many accidental shootings around here lately. Someone just shot themselves in the hand while upholstering and another while they were cleaning. Pulled the trigger cause they thought it was empty... With their other hand over the barrel.


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Humans make errors all the time. Glocks seem to have a lot of people who have accidents with them...even leo. New gun owners are pretty good if they are older and have read the manuals. Most accidents that I have seen are either shooting at unsafe backstops or just pulling the trigger oin a gun handed to the person. It even happens to seasoned shooters and if more people are shooters then there will be more accidents.
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Old 03-21-2013, 22:42   #5
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Originally Posted by jame View Post
I hate to be indelicate, because we're all "2nd Amendment, HELL YEAH!" around here, but is anyone mildly concerned about some of the new gun owners that have zero experience with firearms?

I've talked a bit with some of the guys at my local place of business, and they say they do. My concern is that the new guy is going to come home from work and throw his loaded G26 in his sock drawer when he gets home, without a second thought that his 6 year old will get his hands on it.

Has anyone else had the same thoughts?
Yes, but it's their responsibility to get training and guidance.

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Old 03-21-2013, 22:48   #6
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Yes, but it's their responsibility to get training and guidance.

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I understand that. But that doesn't squelch my concerns when I find out that my son in law gets home from work and throws his compact nine on the kitchen counter as he heads for the shower. I have a six year old grandson, and his injury would crush me.

I bought him a small safe, and understand that he's using it, but how many more little kids may be at risk? Or is that, too, "Not my problem?"

I fear, sooner or later, it will be all of our problem.

Last edited by jame; 03-21-2013 at 22:48..
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:03   #7
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I understand that. But that doesn't squelch my concerns when I find out that my son in law gets home from work and throws his compact nine on the kitchen counter as he heads for the shower. I have a six year old grandson, and his injury would crush me.

I bought him a small safe, and understand that he's using it, but how many more little kids may be at risk? Or is that, too, "Not my problem?"

I fear, sooner or later, it will be all of our problem.
Well, instead of *****ing about it here on GT, why not talk to your SIL about it and educate him? That's the first step I'd take. We're all teachers of something in life. If this is a concern for you start teaching people about gun safety. this should include children too just like your grandson. My 5 year old daughter knows the Eddie Eagle rules and my almost-2-year-old is now learning that stuff too. I don't always leave my guns out but when I do, they have been triple checked and they know not to touch them. That's not often but sometimes I have to get at something in the safe and the long guns have to be laid out on the bed. I don't hide my guns from them and I encourage them to ask questions about them.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:12   #8
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This sounds a lot like the generational arguements that often arise here......... " what wrong with todays generation"..... not as - - fill in the blank - - as previous generations.

Why should we (us older or more experienced folks) think we are any more or less safe when we started out in firearms those starting today.

Sounds strange to me. I suspect, this new group is probably no less safe or likely to create a risk than when you - all started.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:22   #9
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This sounds a lot like the generational arguements that often arise here......... " what wrong with todays generation"..... not as - - fill in the blank - - as previous generations.

Why should we (us older or more experienced folks) think we are any more or less safe when we started out in firearms those starting today.

Sounds strange to me. I suspect, this new group is probably no less safe or likely to create a risk than when you - all started.
I think too many gun owners want to appear reasonable to non-owners. It's reasonable to want everyone to be safe. Therefore, its reasonable to require it. We have all watched as government and society has chipped away at personal responsibility and has attempted to protect the individual from themselves in every way shape or form.

I can understand wanting a family member protected from harm. I cannot understand wanting the government to force that protection.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:38   #10
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This is an issue of responsibility.

Children cannot legally buy or own guns until they are at least 18 years of age, to the best of my knowledge.

I know some gun owners train their kids how to safely handle firearms,and in some parts of the country (mostly rural areas) the culture surrounding guns is totally different than it is in others.

I know folks who take their kids hunting and trust them fully with their firearms, which is absolutely fantastic.

However, the fact remains that adults are responsible for their firearms and IMHO, should be held accountable for their failure to secure them.

Losing a child is a horrible event.
My sister lost her 9 year old son two weeks before his 10th birthday to cancer many years ago and she still isn't over it and I believe if it had been due to something that was preventable it would have been even harder for her to cope with.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:56   #11
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Pssssssst , We were all newbs at one time..! Shhhhh..!
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Old 03-22-2013, 10:45   #12
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I understand that. But that doesn't squelch my concerns when I find out that my son in law gets home from work and throws his compact nine on the kitchen counter as he heads for the shower. I have a six year old grandson, and his injury would crush me.

I bought him a small safe, and understand that he's using it, but how many more little kids may be at risk? Or is that, too, "Not my problem?"

I fear, sooner or later, it will be all of our problem.
I would have a serious conversation with your son in law about safe storage of his pistol around the kids. That is totally irresponsible and negligent on his part.
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Old 03-22-2013, 10:49   #13
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I understand that. But that doesn't squelch my concerns when I find out that my son in law gets home from work and throws his compact nine on the kitchen counter as he heads for the shower. I have a six year old grandson, and his injury would crush me.

I bought him a small safe, and understand that he's using it, but how many more little kids may be at risk? Or is that, too, "Not my problem?"

I fear, sooner or later, it will be all of our problem.
The safe slows you down to defend an intruder in your house. It's not worth it. Train everyone in family. Past in America, almost everyone knew how to handle the gun. Liberals has won in this battle.
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Old 03-22-2013, 10:56   #14
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The safe slows you down to defend an intruder in your house. It's not worth it. Train everyone in family. Past in America, almost everyone knew how to handle the gun. Liberals has won in this battle.
Sometimes my five granddaughters, ages 3 to 13, have a hard time understanding proper stance (Isosceles? Weaver? Variation?), clearing jams, quick mag changes, etc. I'm thinking the safe is a good idea for a few more years.

Last edited by PhotoFeller; 03-22-2013 at 11:35..
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Old 03-22-2013, 12:21   #15
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The safe slows you down to defend an intruder in your house. It's not worth it. Train everyone in family. Past in America, almost everyone knew how to handle the gun. Liberals has won in this battle.
I think this is the first time I've agreed with one of your posts.. But I wholeheartedly agree with this one.
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Old 03-23-2013, 17:41   #16
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I understand that. But that doesn't squelch my concerns when I find out that my son in law gets home from work and throws his compact nine on the kitchen counter as he heads for the shower. I have a six year old grandson, and his injury would crush me.
You might have other concerns. Is your sil strapping the kid in when he's riding in the car? Is he wearing his helmet when riding a bike? Is he eating too many French fries? Is he not getting enough exercise? Did he just bring home a pit bull?

At what point do you just take over and raise the kid?
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Old 03-26-2013, 18:11   #17
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I understand that. But that doesn't squelch my concerns when I find out that my son in law gets home from work and throws his compact nine on the kitchen counter as he heads for the shower. I have a six year old grandson, and his injury would crush me.

I bought him a small safe, and understand that he's using it, but how many more little kids may be at risk? Or is that, too, "Not my problem?"

I fear, sooner or later, it will be all of our problem.
No, it's not your problem. Help who you can. But drop the Christ complex, you can't save all sinners. People do have a responsibility to get proper training and learn firearms safety and responsibility, especially when it pertains to innocent children. But if you're going to take that tact, then you need to be preaching to drunks in bars, before they get in their cars, carpenters who are less than careful where they point their nail guns, form a one man search team, and inspect every household in your town, with chemicals stored under sinks and in cabinets that can harm children and pets, do fire and smoke alarm checks, etc. etc... I think your heart is in the right place but your responsibility ends at a certain point, and someone else's begins.
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Old 03-26-2013, 18:16   #18
jame
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No, it's not your problem. Help who you can. But drop the Christ complex.....
J.

Christ complex?

Concern for my grandson's safety is a Christ complex?

Yeah........thanks for the advice. Now grow the hell up.
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Old 03-26-2013, 19:43   #19
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Christ complex?

Concern for my grandson's safety is a Christ complex?

Yeah........thanks for the advice. Now grow the hell up.
Dude, maybe your intellect needs a little maturing. If you read the thread in it's context, all I was saying was that you can't be responsible for all gun owners. Neither can I or anyone else. Some folks will have to put the onus of responsibility upon themselves. In the case of your grandson, it would be quite simple for you to approach those around them, educate them, warn them or whatever it takes to keep the child safe. But the tone of your post was more like you're worried about the "world". By Christ complex, I meant, and if your not able to comprehend, I'll explain. You can only do so much, you can't save the world, just concentrate on your part of it. New guns come with plenty of warnings about firearm safety. If your grandson's father knows firearm safety and still tosses his loaded weapon in proximity of his unattended child, then he deserves to have child services called, and either the child or the weapon removed. Your rabid response indicates that there may be similarities in personalities that need to be addressed. Now, if your capable, and refuse to be obtuse, re-read the thread, and you'll see what I mean...maybe.

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Old 03-27-2013, 07:19   #20
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No, it's not your problem. Help who you can. But drop the Christ complex, you can't save all sinners. People do have a responsibility to get proper training and learn firearms safety and responsibility, especially when it pertains to innocent children. But if you're going to take that tact, then you need to be preaching to drunks in bars,...

form a one man search team, and inspect every household in your town, with chemicals stored under sinks and in cabinets that can harm children and pets, do fire and smoke alarm checks, etc. etc...


J.
Hear hear.

The "It's for the children" histrionic is a famed socialist tactic for sounding the false alarm, which most good and decent Americans are duped by this kind of rhetoric every year this legislation comes up to DC.
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Old 03-25-2013, 05:48   #21
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Yes, but it's their responsibility to get training and guidance.

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Not only that but if they're that stupid to begin with, it's only a matter of time before they screwed up in some other way. You can't protect everyone from themselves.
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Old 03-21-2013, 22:46   #22
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My Dad kept his Colt Woodsman in his sock drawer. Still does actually. He is nearly 87 y.o. and although the sights look fuzzy to his old eyes, he can still bounce a target along the ground with it shooting from the hip.
We all knew the gun was there in his drawer, but knew better than to touch it.
I guess things are different now days. I keep mine locked up unless I am using them.
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Old 03-22-2013, 08:55   #23
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My Dad kept his Colt Woodsman in his sock drawer. Still does actually. He is nearly 87 y.o. and although the sights look fuzzy to his old eyes, he can still bounce a target along the ground with it shooting from the hip.
We all knew the gun was there in his drawer, but knew better than to touch it.
I guess things are different now days. I keep mine locked up unless I am using them.
Same here. Growing up my dad kept his gun in a closet. It wasn't easily accessible to me or my sister, but we both knew where it was. We also knew we where going to get the wrath of God if we messed with it. But dad took the curiosity out of guns by familiarizing us with them. If we wanted to see it he would get it out and show us, but first he cleared it, and then made us do it to. Best lesson if gun safety a kid could ask for as far as I'm concerned.

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Old 03-22-2013, 08:56   #24
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Edit: double post

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Old 03-22-2013, 09:10   #25
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There's never been a shortage of irresponsible people.

These people do all kinds of things that put others at risk. Drinking and driving. Driving without regard for the safety of others even if not drinking. Heavy machinery. Toying with explosives they learned how to make on the internet.

The list of things people do that put others in danger is so long I'm sure it would stagger the imagination of even the most creative mind.

Yes, we'll eventually hear of incidents from these newfound firearm owners. Not because they're new or anything special related to the frenzy of buying - but because they are people. There are simply some people who are an accident waiting to happen.

So do I worry about them? Yes. But no more than I would concern myself over any normal gun owner.

I'm far more concerned, for my own safety and the safety of my family, with the idiot hunter who shoots are bushes when the wind blows. There's no shortage of those idiots and they are generally male and grew up around and are well educated in the safety of firearms. They simply choose to ignore that education and be stupid.

I'm also more concerned with the guy on the highway swirving into my lane while texting or changing a radio station.
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